Finding triggers

Posted , 7 users are following.

I'm a nurse, 58 years old, slim, fit and active.  I've started to have short (a few hours) episodes of atrial fibrillation that stops me working.  they started at the end of last year and have occurred every 6 or 7 weeks.  I get the odd 'flutter' most days too.  I'm not a heavy drinker and I don't smoke but I think maybe it was triggered by red wine (now stopped). The most recent episode was yesterday morning following a Sunday of cycling, beer/prosecco and cheese on toast to say nothing of the night cap of whisky (one only!!).  It was a relief when my heart flipped spontaneously back into sinus rhythm but I always feel tired and washed out afterwards.  I exercise with no problem but if I'm tired, dehydrated and not careful with what I'm eating (and drinking) then I'm risking things. I'm not on any meds although my GP wants to start me on Metoprolol but I'm trying to manage this thing through lifestyle choices, coconut water and cashew nuts for magnesium - I'll let you know if I succeed.  Regards to all.

ps: having an echo this afternoon, cholesterol normal.

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  • Posted

    Hi Ian, 

    How did the echo go? Although I realise they probably didnt give you any results yet. 

    I think you are suffering from a latent reaction to alcohol. Maybe you should give up all drink for 3 or 4 months to see if the attacks go. 

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    • Posted

      Echo was fine thanks.  Results in 10 days or so.  I also think it must be alcohol for me.  I have kept a diary and it seems pretty conclusive - once on holiday in France, once on Boxing Day ... I used to wake during the night after drinking 'too much' wine and my heart would be racing.  This might be a progression from that sinus tachycardia to paroxysmal AF.  I'll cut down, to the odd beer and see what happens.

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    • Posted

      You can ggogle this but I'll mention what I remember - a study was recently done on young males who participated in Oktober Fest in Germany and out of something like 1,800 study participants it was found that 30% had heart palpitations as a result of the heavy drinking.

      That is a huge number, but it should definitely tell a story to anyone with afib concerned about triggers.

      From what I remember, in many of the cases, it dd not taker a lot of alcohol to start the palpitations.

      Frank 

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    • Posted

      Yes I saw that too.  Very interesting and definitely a link.  Thanks for your replies - I'll try to update with my progress when I can ... just off to buy some cashews (no more wine for me).

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    • Posted

      Mind your teeth with the nuts while I open a bottle of Fitou:-)

      Article in todays Daily Mail that for men a bar of chocolate a day prevents AF. 

       

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    • Posted

      hunted it down online, it says it prevents many things including heart attack but couldn't find anything about AF. Shame really-what a brilliant thing that would be. 

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  • Posted

    I started Magnesium supplements a year ago. More importantly perhaps, I started on a probiotic after having terrible stomach and digestive problems ( together with a fib attacks) last Xmas. I have been aware that my a fib can be triggered by diet for some time but it is sometimes difficult to identify the culprits with certainty. Since taking the pro biotic my incidence of attacks seems to have diminished. I tried the supplements having followed this forum, particularly Frank 61666. Keep the Vagus Nerve calm!
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  • Posted

    G'day Ian,

    ?Drinks, be they hot or cold, be they tea or coffee or alcohol - are and never have been an issue.

    ?It took me 4 months from paroxysmal AF diagnosis to realise food was causing my AF via a dysfunctional vagal nerve.

    ?Symptoms were, lower intestinal gurgling, burping, diahorrea and incredible pressure on the heart rising up from the diaphgram area. Not all together, Diahorrea was regular as was pressure on heart but all happened at random, in no particular order. The gurgling was incredibly loud and socially unacceptable.

    ?My GP had me checked out for IBS and Coeliac Disease - all clear. I then consulted a nutritionist who advised me to go gluten Free, Wheat free, oats free and added sugar free. Also to look at the FODMAPS diet.

    ?In short I gradually turned my food intake habits upside down and over a number of years managed to control everything. She also suggested I go on a course of probiotics to stabilise my gut flora.

    I have now been AF free for a little over 2 years. I have had no cardioversion or surgical procedures. I opted against an ablation.

    ?I was 65 when diagnosed and turn 73 this coming September. I am on 5 mg daily of Bisoprolol and  5 or 6 mg of warfarin daily and some other meds for high blood pressure and statins.

    May the force be with you.

    John

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    • Posted

      We'll done John, I am on my 5th month of probiotics and magnesium, so far so good. I am now becoming sure my problem is with the vagal nerve

      So far so good. I am 73 and have been plagued by p afib for several years. I was only offered ablation. Does the medical profession not know about the misbehaving vagal nerve.

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    • Posted

      Hey Reginald

      You are referring to a relatively new medical field - Neurocardiology.

      Neurocardiology refers to the pathophysiological interplays of the nervous and cardiovascular systems. It is an emerging field in medicine over the last decade. The constant communication between the heart and the brain have proved invaluable to interdisciplinary fields of neurological and cardiac diseases. (I copied this from Wikipedia)

      They are talking about the communication between the brain and the heart, but they should have included the gut and the heart.

      Frank

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    • Posted

      Many refuse to believe it. was in NSR for 15 months after a cardioversion until I had a colonoscopy where the probe stimulated my vagus nerve. Another cardiversion and in NSR for about 10 months until a DRE stimulated my vagus nerve. Other times digestion plus vagus nerve speed up my AF.

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    • Posted

      Here is another issue that no one knows what they are talking about - 95% of the body's seratonin is made in the gut, and that is by gut bacteria. Low seratonin levels are the cause of depression.  So, try to convince a doctor that the the antibiotic he/she gave you last year was the cause of your depression - ain't gonna happen. Today, in the USA depression is becoming an epidemic, as is illegal drug use.  Try to convince an MD of that association.

      Someday.....it might all come together

      Frank

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