Flow test

Posted , 8 users are following.

Is it possible to do a urine flow test at home? if so, is there a standard rate or rule of thumb as to what the quantity or time allowed should be?

Thanks

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15 Replies

  • Posted

    Good question...

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  • Posted

    Good question...

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  • Posted

    If you get a calibrated urinal and a stop watch (most smart phones have that function) you can do a rough measurement to get the average flow for emptying the bladder. Just divide the amount collected by the number of seconds to get the average flow. While I was still dealing with strictures, and after having a urethrotomy, I recall measuring around 13-15 cc/second... until the strictures came back. Then it went down to 7 or 8.

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    • Posted

      I would add, that was with the bladder as full as I could get it while lying down for awhile.

      Measurements done by a urologist are more complex, as they plot the rate vs time during the peeing event. The rises to a peak, stays for awhile, then drops as bladder pressure decreases.

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  • Posted

    AMAZON $10.95 The Uflow meter is a lightweight, portable and easy to use funnel device, which is accurate and reliable for the urodynamic measurement of a man’s urine flow. A man’s flow rate may change or reduce when experiencing LUTS (Lower Urinary Tract Symptoms). The Uflow meter can be used at home with the diary sheet to record the daily flow rate, this can be a useful indictor to the clinician. The Uflow meter can be used to objectively measure flow rate before and after treatment. IMPORTANT: It is advisable to seek the advice of your doctor or nurse when the Uflow meter readings are low (if the urine is only reaching the lower half of the middle section or is in the bottom section only) .

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  • Posted

    Thanks everyone. I think I will order one. is there a "normal" or an average rate?

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    • Posted

      15 ml/sec is typically considered a "demarkation" point. If your max flowrate is higher, you're probably not being impacted by BPH. The lower the max flowrate is the more you are impacted. I've seen a number of clinical studies that used a max flowrate around or equal to 15 ml/sec as a cutoff point for accepting participants in the trial. My own peak flowrate is about half way to 3/4 of the way between the 10 and 15 ml/sec lines on this device. I'm currently doing okay, but use the max flow rate as one criteria to monitor my symptoms, but certainly not the only one. Post-void residual (PVR) is generally more important.

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    • Posted

      Thanks rdemyan,

      Your post helps clears that up. I ordered the Uflow last night. (Now the only have 10 left...lol).

      I'm guessing the only way to do PVR is at the Dr. office.

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    • Posted

      You can perform self catheterization to get a good idea of what the PVR is or you can buy a bladder scanner to measure PVR. Jimjames has a thread on this blog regarding the bladder scanner. I have a scanner that I purchased from eBay. I'm an engineer who used to be a researcher so I don't mind having devices and gadgets and performing "safe" tests on myself. However, bladder scanners are not as accurate as I would like. Even in the doctor's office they aren't that accurate and I've found that some doctor's assistants don't know how to use them correctly. I've had mine for 7 months and it took quite some time to feel like I'm getting reasonably accurate readings. I generally have to take about 5 readings during a session. If you're serious about getting one, read the jimjames thread. Expect to pay at least $1000 for a reasonably accurate one. On eBay make sure that the ad says the scanner is functional as a lot of scanners are sold for parts.

      Do you know about what your PVR is?

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    • Posted

      I do not know what my PVR is as it has not been checked after my procedure(2.5 yrs. ago. I am now on my third uro as of 6 months ago). i see the uro next week and can ask them to check it.

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    • Posted

      In August of 2018, I got a new uro. His assistant measured my PVR using a bladder scanner and it came back as zero, which I knew was incorrect. The assistant brought in a second scanner and still got zero. When the doctor arrived I mentioned to him that the result was zero and he didn't believe it either. The doctor then used the same machine and got a reading of 68 mL.

      In October 2018, I had a bad UTI. After the first course of antibiotics didn't clear it up, I had an urgent care appt. I talked the physican's asst into conducting a bladder scan. A tech came in and performed the scan. Once again, the results were unreasonably low, but I mentioned to her that I had a scanner myself. She spent quite a bit of time moving the scanner head around and finally got a reasonable reading. Later I mentioned this to my uro, and he agreed that the tech needed to put the probe close to my pubic bone. She was as high as my navel!

      Just two weeks ago, I had a transabdominal ultrasound of the prostate, bladder and kidneys. I had had two before and this time I brought a measuring cup with me. The machine is a GE machine that looks like it costs tens of thousands of dollars. The tech measured 44 mL in my bladder before my urinating. After urination, she measured 22 mL. In my measuring cup I had peed 100 mL. I mentioned it to her and she just shrugged her shoulders.

      I'm guessing you don't self cath routinely, otherwise, that would be the best way to measure PVR. I've only self-cathed twice, once to learn and once to get an idea of the PVR, so I could compare it with the PVR measured by my bladder scanner. However, I don't like self cathing and my plan is to only do it in emergency situations.

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  • Posted

    The issue is not if you can perform such a test cheaply and at home. The issue is can you report on the test in a meaningful way that may lead to treatment?

    If not then I suggest you allow an experienced urologist conduct and report on the urine flow test.

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