Fluid in gallbladder fossa post cholestysectomy

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Hi. Would appreciate any advice. I had my gallbladder surgery 7 months ago. After the surgery I had a couple kind of normal months then started to go down hill again. When my gallbladder was taken out, I had no stones or sludge, but it was chronically inflamed. I thought I was going to bounce back regardless, but then I started feeling weak over time and my bilirubin counts went up again. I've had some low grade fevers off and on and occasionally dull pain in my gallbladder area off and on. Both my indirect and direct bilirubin are elevated, indirect is higher than the direct. My blood counts have also been off, low WBC, low rbc, low hematocrit, low mcv, low protein, low bun, low ptt time (meaning I'm prone to clotting right now), low potassium even with replacements. Chloride was high even with fluids and c02 was borderline low. They checked an enzyme to make sure it wasn't malnourishment and confirmed it's not from malnourishment or malnutrition and they did an mrcp. On the mrcp they found I have non organized fluid collecting in my gallbladder fossa. Can someone tell me if that's normal for 7 months post op? The doctors keep telling me that's normal but I would not think I would still have fluid collecting there 7 months later and I know sometimes bile leaks can be caught very late because of the approach of calling the fluid collection insignificant. If anyone can tell me perhaps if I should be considering whether this is a bile or liver leak at this point and the difference between organized and non organized fluid collecting I would greatly appreciate it because if it is a leak the longer it goes the poorer the prognosis. 

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  • Posted

    I want to also make sure I mention, I was in a bad car accident in august (3 1/2 months post op). I was t boned on my drivers side. There's not a chance my accident could have caused a tear or loosened my surgical clips to cause a leak could it? 

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  • Posted

    Under endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) control, a 19-gauge needle was inserted through the duodenal wall into the gallbladder fossa fluid collection. A guide wire was coiled within the collection, and an endoprosthesis was placed over the wire. Endoprosthesis insertion was successful in both cases, resulting in rapid symptomatic and radiographic improvement. EUS-guided drainage offers a minimally invasive alternative to percutaneous treatment of persistent gallbladder fossa fluid collections following cholecystectomy.

    You night need to drain it, so it doesn't build up and cause a infection.

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  • Posted

    Look im not a doctor. Just giving you my experience of having the same problems and being in hospitals most of my life. Due to my health problems. I think people like me another patients can give you the best advice since doctors really never tell you everything remember it's only advice .

    The best thing you can do is go to a specialist.

    But one the "I did stay at a Holiday Inn" LOL !!!!

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    • Posted

      Regardless thank you so much for your advice and help. My surgeon would not give me the time of day so we have found another surgeon who is going to take on my case. They don't think fluid this long after is normal so hopefully they are able to figure it out and I will update so if anyone else has this problem in the future maybe this post will help them. 

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  • Posted

    I am two years on and nausea is worse and loose motions still.  I am not sure which dieection next. Gp suggests ultrasound and bloods but i think the surgeon who did lap choly should be involved and be able to tell me how to go forward as pain in back is now here which it wasnt cor a year post op.

    anything i can do meantime to feel better?

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    • Posted

      Have you been tested for ebv or autoimmune liver diseases? Did you have stones? I ask because you may still be having issues not because you lost your gallbladder, but because of what caused it to fail. That's where I'm at. I thought I was still having complications from the surgery, but it's what's causing it not because I actually lost the gallbladder. I think it's a key factor a lot of people don't realize. My failure was acalculous caused by ebv and then it continued to harm my liver and cause autoimmune liver issues after the gallbladder was removed. I would have a full autoimmune panel done and get tested for ebv. It's a complication of ebv that most people are unaware of. 

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    • Posted

      Oh yes. But you do need to make sure you don't have any stomach ulcers because if you've had reflux for a long period of time that can cause it but yes if you are still feeling generally unwell both ebv and liver problems can definitely cause it. Doctors had never seen a case like mine either. I had no stones and saw upwards of 60+ doctors. Ebv related aac is extremely rare but I think more people get it than just myself and it most often happens to females. I have the ebv and autoimmune and I'm almost always nauseous with no appetite. In fact I only weigh 100lbs right now and still losing weight. Here's some of the tests you can do to help narrow things down: upper scope, mrcp, full autoimmune panel(sucks bc I think I had to do 14 vials of blood, but proved worth it), ebv panel, and perhaps even an mre. Then if any of that is positive for liver perhaps, you may need a final liver biopsy. If you need any help I hope I can help assist you because I know how scary it is to constantly not be feeling well especially with nausea 

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