Frozen shoulder hereditary ?

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Just another thought , as any one else had a family member who has had FS? My mum when she was in her late 30s also had frozen shoulder ... In those days (30 years ago), she tells me the cure was "gold injections", she never had to have any surgery , just regular injections and some massage, she says she had it for around 10 months.. Around this time she also had to have a hysterectomy and there was stress within the family; which also promotes the hormone and stress theory of how this awful condition comes about??

Cindy

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  • Posted

    Both my parents had a lot of ill-heath including arthritis and my Mum had osteoporosis but I'm not aware of anyone having a frozen shoulder.  My sister has gold injections for severe rheumatoid arthritis  - I'm not sure they know quite how this works but it has certainly helped her.  I've never heard of it being used for frozen shoulders.  My consultant dismissed the hormone link - but as there has been no proper research, I'm still convinced there is some sort of link - there certainly seems to be a lot of anecdotal evidence.  If they could find a cause, we might be on the way to some proper treatment.
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    • Posted

      Oh so they still do do gold injections ?? , that's intersting as my mum swore by them for easing her discomfort. So I wander why they are not offered to us today ? Yes my mum has had a lot of ill health (she still does) and my dad had severe rheumatoid arthritis. I'm not to sure how these doctors can keep dismissing theories when they seem to have no idea how/ why it starts as well as no blinking idea how to stop it.. So grateful to this forum , it probably helps to keep us sane. Thanks for your reply Maria , hope you ok ? Cindy
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    • Posted

      I'm well on the road to recovery Cindy - thanks for asking.  The hydrodilatation worked well for me - no miracle release of the shoulder but slowly and surely my movements are improving and I'm not in pain.  I'm able to live a normal life with just some minor restrictions on my furthest movements.   So far, despite some twinges, my other shoulder is OK for now (fingers crossed it stays that way) and I'm trying to excercise both equally.  I'm sure I'm much better after going back on my normal dose of HRT!  I do feel and empathise for all those still suffering from this awful condition but there is light at the end of the tunnel.
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  • Posted

    Hi Cindy, always interested to read about and hear peoples theories on all of this.  Reckon there could be a family link but could be more about lifetsyle and habits inherited from our parents both good and bad perhaps?....  i.e. we are all hearing about the damage of a suger rich diet and salt and most people dont realise just how much they consume or are in denial.  I am breaking the habits of a lifetime with recognising how much of both I eat and reducing it drastically becaue i think that when we get to middle age it is often a case of overload and the body can't deal with problems.  I also read before on this site about the potential benefits of turmeric in our diet (fresh not dried?)  and in the news today is an article all about the health benefits of a daily dose.  Triggers may be hormonal in my opinion tipping the balance for women especially and affecting the timescale for recovery.  For me, coming out the other side of FS (hurrah!!!) now, nearly 2 years since injury triggered,  my opinion is that no matter what they try and do to help it surgically, unless there is a really good surgical need for intervention and shaving the shoulder may not be one of them in my non doctor view, then you will still take the same time to recover  if you had left it be.  I wish there was more on accepting the condition by the doctors and people around us and giving people immediate time off work to rest, several deep massages a week (maybe when the initial zingers stop) as they do in indian medicine which costs money but would be a much cheaper than surgery on the NHS surely and finally - being good to ourselves -  I have noticed it is the very active 'doers' in life who seem to suffer from this.  The temptation is to push push push through it forcing exercises wanting an instant cure.  There isnt any instant cure and help is needed to accept this physically, psycholgically and with practical help for people to get through it.  Getting a proper FS diagnosis in the first place would help as there are other similar conidtions and the treatment needed different but all can go on to FS when the body is under pain stress and that of course affects our hormone levels.

    I wish you the very best xx

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    • Posted

      Hi penny thank you for your reply, yes I also believe that diet has a major effect on our health. I most certainly didn't have a good diet as I was growing up, and then after I had my children I spent years consuming , low fat sugar free foods which I now realise we're not an healthy alternative at all.. I am very conscious about what I eat now, and yes I too consume tumeric , ginger and honey and lemon regularly as I am aware of their health benefits. I am so pleased to hear that you are through the other side, and yes I agree that i don't think the process can be halted , I definitely will not be electing for surgery , as I am holding onto the thought that this won't last forever , this too will pass and I will be "normal" again.. I also agree that yes the medical profession should do more to help sufferes understand what it is they are going through , the course of events , the longevity of the condition etc. I am just glad I found this site, it stopped me from thinking I was alone and slowly going mad😳

      Take care

      Cindy

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  • Posted

    Funny you mention that my mum has it as we speak but shes gon past her painful phase just movement issues be to her GP he printed ofva sheet of exercises sent her on her way maybe because shes 67 she to had a hysterectomy i on the otber hand have had various gybae procedures makes you wonder if its hormonal
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    • Posted

      Hi glad to hear your mum is getting through it,, the doctors can be so unsympathetic to the condition, or they just do not know enough about it.. I believe first and foremost it is hormone related closely followed with a link to stress . Hope you ok karen

      Cindy

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    • Posted

      Mines quite bad still even after 22 months i havecanother orthopaefic appointment i think this one will be to arrange surgery i dont have mych choice because of my job its very active job and if i dont get this sorted i could loose my job which i dont want. But will see what happens x hope yours gets better soon
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  • Posted

    I know this discussion is over a year old, so I'm not sure if anyone will see this. I live in the United States and was just diagnosed with FS two days ago. I was researching if it's hereditary because my mother has had it, both of her sisters, and my only female cousin from one of my aunts. My mother informed me that my father also suffered from it, which I guess it's rare for a man to have. It's the most painful thing I've ever gone through, and I'm hoping to prevent my sister from getting it. So that's why I am doing the hereditary research. Guess it's not looking too good for her.

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    • Posted

      Hi. Shannon

      Yes I am still around...... I recovered from my first FS within 12 months and was hoping beyond hope that I wouldn't be one of the statistics and get a second FS. Unfortunately I started to get the all to familiar twinges back in December last year; I believe I am almost frozen again as thankfully the pain is subsiding and I am achieving more hours uninterrupted sleep. I find it very interesting that so many of your family members have had this awful condition but the medical profession do not believe it to be hereditary? And as far as I can make it the medical profession seem to lack any concrete evidence as to what/ why FS occurs? I also thought there could be a link with hormones or stress but again. No factual evidence to.back this up as this was another discussion that I started.

      I wish you and your sister well and I hope she is spared; but if she does get it too then.that will definitely help to prove your theory. Please let me know.

      Take care

      Cindy

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    • Posted

      Sorry to hear you have FS too sad  

      Yes, my mom was diagnosed with FS too some years ago, and something similar has re-occurred at age 81 even though she is active. We both have thyroid antibodies (so take minimal synthroid), no other hormone troubles, have normal weight, and eat healthily.

      I would like to see the thyroid connection explored more, since it's definitely genetic.

      All the best, Liane 

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    • Posted

      FS, Your mother at 81 may have something but as you say similar to FS. FS 40 to 60 only. In our 80s many shoulders become stiff and sore and show at least early arthritic signs.

      In the scientific literature hormones have been studied for years in the supposed cause of FS, Dupuytrens and their sister conditions but with little real confirmation. Google "Dupuytrens frozen shoulder", knuckle pads and fibromatosis foot. Also The "Viking disease, Frozen shoulder".

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    • Posted

      Hi Shannon

      I have heard that the gender split amongst FS sufferers is about 55/45% female / male.  I am male and had arthroscopic release surgery for FS about 6 momths ago; I am now almost completely better, i.e. no pain and 95% of ROM back.  As regards the hereditory theories, interestingly my brother also had FS a few years back, so there may be something in it.  Both of us were in our early 60s when we were diagnosed.  Anecdotal evidence is no proof though of course.  There may be something in the hormonal theories, but if so, it presumably would have to be a hormone that affects both sexes.  

      The medical profession does not know what causes FS, and I don't know how much research is going on to find these out.  There is an NHS trial to find the best course of treatment once FS is diagnosed (which I am taking part in), but the road to recovery seems to be long and painful whichever course of treatment is taken.  My brother recovered in about the same time as me without any surgery, only occaisional physio.  

      My sympathies to all FS sufferers out there; just remember you will recover!

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  • Posted

    I am on my second FS & the hassle you have to go through to receive treatment from the GP is ridiculous! Finally after having hydrodilatation with my first FS in my L shoulder movement returned gradually & pain went instantly. Now after months of pain, the GP administered a steroid injection into the shoulder & all I can say is what a waste of time as I am still the same, no relief at all from having it. I have hassled the GP & have received my appointment for hydrodilatation in July 2017 although big headed he is said "I have never been unsuccessful with giving the steroid injection & patients haven't complained " well Mr big head there is always a first unsuccessful procedure & I am that 1. He has advised the hospital to do an ultrasound on my shoulder prior to the hydrodilatation as he said "if the capsule is smooth & clear I will not be having the hydrodilatation " I will be having the treatment as I am still in the same painful & non movement stage! So GP put that up your nose & pick it! I wish you all the best on your recovery as it is slow as the GP's don't refer patients for the most simple easy procedure.

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