Gallstones diet

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I am waiting for gallbladder surgery as my gallbladder is full of

stones. Saw my consultant yesterday and he said in order for my gallbladder to not become inflamed (and possibly lead to open surgery) then I must go on a NO fat diet. No meat, no fish, no cheese, no butter etc. Has anyone else been put on such a restrictive diet? I thought low fat would be acceptable but NO fat??

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  • Posted

    I was advised to go on a minimal fat diet of 3% and below. My jaw dropped to the floor at 3%. Having trying to stick to a 5% diet in the past, I knew 3% was going to be almost impossible. Zero fat would be almost impossible unless you munch on lettuce (figuratively)

    How long are you expected to eat like that? Ive been waiting 3 months already and may be waiting another 3 months. 3% is pretty tough. There is no way I could stick to 0%. No way on earth. My gallbladder is thick and full of stones too. Stick to the lowest fat you can. It does work. Touch wood no more full on attacks here. I eat chicken breast no skin and skin removed before cooking, pork loin with fat removed before cooking and extra lean less than 5% fat steak mince browned and drained before I add any sauce. That's my main protien. But if that's the advice the doc has given you, I wouldn't say go against it but 0% or even 3% isn't good or healthy in any long term. Your body needs good fats but you must not eat any of them now such as nuts eggs, oily fish, some grains or olive oil. I was also told if I had another attack it would put me back to the start of waiting again so that's kept focus. But 0% goodness me that is ridiculous.

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  • Posted

    Yes love I'm on it and quite honestly I don't think it works and not all doctors recommend it, I have lost stone and a half and have felt really ill and weak. My remedy is to drink lots of water keep the stones moving., I've started eating low fat again and I do have more energy, not a lot though. No fat diet is awfully hard to follow.good luck dear x
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  • Posted

    Obviously everyone can tolerate different amounts of fat, I personally struggled with much of anything towards the end of a 1yr battle before it exploded. I'm not sure about a no fat diet, I would have thought that was kind of impossible since most foods contain at least some fat, but I just worked out which foods didn't have me writhing in agony every night.

    Some of the few things I was able to eat were plain chicken, cooked without oil in non stick pans. Wholewheat pasta with careful consideration to sauces - I could eat low fat tomato sauce, but mostly ate it plain just to have some variety. I ate a lot of Coco Pops with semi skimmed milk, in fact towards the end that's what I purely lived on, when I could be bothered to eat.

    I swapped most meat for turkey & venison. The venison burgers were a lifesaver during the summer BBQs. I just ate it plain, and with no sides. Also, I ate very small amounts at a time. Partly the fear of an attack cured my hunger, and partly I found by not overwhelming my body, it responded better to food I did manage to eat.

    Hopefully your surgery comes round soon, my life has gotten so much better without the thing!

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  • Posted

    Just had my galll bladder removed and was fed jello and apple sauce before surgery. After surgery I was giving bacon eggs hashbrowns and toast. for breakfast then a chicken salad for dinner.  I forgot what lunch was but I havnt had a bowel movement yet.  There's a little pain but nothing like it was.  I'm taking meds for the pain and some anti-biotics.  Just waiting on the bowel movement.  Tomorrow I'm sticking to just vegetables and it's going to become a wait and see ordeal.  Im across in the pond in the States.
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    • Posted

      Andrew it's such a problem I'm in hospital at the moment but they don't seem too bothered about it. Think I'm going back to my normal diet as the hospital just gives me ordinary good nothing low fat so what the point.i was terrible constipated and used a fleet eanama but never again think that's what has caused the leakage, sorry to be so graphic but only way I can understand it x
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  • Posted

    Yes.  I was diagnosed with gallstones Christmas 2014.

    I had my gallbladder removed in April 2015.

    During all that time NO FAT diet.

    Yes it is boring but if the fatty foods are causing you so much pain it is worth keeping off them.

    If you are waiting for surgery and you are willing to have operation at short notice if someone else cancels it may be worth mentioning this as it might get you in for your operation earlier. This is what I did.

    Praying for you

    Take care and keep in touch

    Sarah xxx

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  • Posted

    I am in the same boat. I am avoiding fat as much as possible,substituting coconut oil  or olive oil for animal fats which seems to be ok.  Fish is ok not fried. Beetroot and avocado have also been recommended in various gall stone diet sheets. I can eat Lizis Granola and Quinoa grapes etc. I still have some pain but it doesn't last so long as if I eat cheese or chocolate. Since the new year I have lost a stone which is good.The Consultant just told me to avoid fatty and fried foods. The diets I am following are off the internet. I have just bought Betaine HCL which is supposed to help if you must eat a fatty meal. I'm a bit scared to try it but I've been taking high doses of omeprazole for a misdiagnosed gerd problem which I think has aggravated the gall bladder. A scan last month revealed multiple gall stones. Do you have access to a dietician for further advice? I hope you find a diet that helps. For me it's trial and error.
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  • Posted

    Once your gallstone surgery is over, you have to mainly intake liquids like broth and gelatin, and then slowly transit to solid food items when you start feeling better. Your gallbladder used to break-down fats from your body, but now when it is removed, you have to take care to not to consume fatty foods, else you may experience bloating, diarrhea, and gas.
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