Gestational diabetes

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I'm 32 weeks pregnant and have gestational diabetes. My glucose levels seem to spike after breakfast, not sure why as I've only been having toast or eggs, has anyone got any suggestions what I could have instead to ease the levels down? It seems to be between 6.3 and 9.3 the last week.

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  • Posted

    Putting food in the oven and your suprised that the blood sugar goes up. It is supposed to go up. How high is directly related to what you eat and how much. I can not eat bread at all. Spikes of 40-50 points ( I am in the USA) White bread, white rice have been off the menu for a long time. Remove the bread try some beans or veggie of your choice with a couple of poached eggs. I do my poached eggs in the microwave, add in 3 table spoons of beans, then some of my favorite hot sauce and that works for me. I like cauliflower and broccoli as well. Frozen or fresh never canned.

    I urge you to talk to your doctor as soon as possible about this. Being preggers changes a whole lot of things in your body. 

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  • Posted

    I know it is supposed to go up, but I didn't know how much by. My consultant suggested I have toast or eggs & bacon for breakfast, as I was having cereal and this spiked my blood sugar quite high. I don't have white bread or any white carbs, just brown, as I know this can cause a spike too. I will try and remove the bread and just have eggs, bacon and beans instead, and mushrooms, see if this helps. I have an appointment with my consultant Monday, so will see what she says then.

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    • Posted

      cereal is WAY too many carbs and they teach this sort of thing in the classes they usually make you take part in. Theres over 30 carbs in the cereal alone, and Milk is loaded with them. The two combined is like a sugar bomb for your body.
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  • Posted

    if you are only having toast and eggs that is not enough carbs to cause a spike - in normal land. However in gestational land, thats plenty. However it is very important that you get those carbs (and the recommended for meal that I was given is 30 carbs a meal, 15 carbs a snack), therefore keep your carbs in that range. If you are still spiking, and I hope you monitor before and after each meal with a meter, you are going to need insulin. The day I gave birth I returned to normal and did not need any at all, however during pregnancy I was fully insullin dependent with no clear reason for it (I was 135 pounds pregnant at 5'4 and ended up losing 8 pounds in last month of pregnancy putting me at a high of 150 when I should have been closer to 160.) The reason they gave me was hormones. I had influxes that were completely unpredictable. One day a meal would put me in the 300 zone, then the next day the same meal with the same insulin and I was crashing out. In my experience, when I was high before eating I had to take a fast acting insulin before I ate. If i was normal to low, I wouldnt take any. It takes constant monitoring, but you cannot do it without being followed by a diabetes specialist because while your pregnant if you start burning keytones (when your not getting enough carbs in an attempt to keep your sugar levels low) it has dire consequences on the baby. Your doctor should give you keytone strips to check your urin, and put you into a gestational diabetes program which usually starts with a class and then treatment. Do not wait I cannot stress that enough. I lost my second child late in pregnancy due to these influxes in my body.

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    • Posted

      the most important thing I can add is that you dont want to be low all the time, you dont want to be high all the time, but what caused my late term miscarriage was the drastic swings in my numbers. You have to get your numbers consistant.
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