Getting back to normal

Posted , 7 users are following.

I’m 36 years old with 2 children (2 yo and 3 months old).  I had surgery a little over 1 week ago (Feb 7) to repair a cystocele (stage 3), rectocele (stage 1), enterocele ligation, and perineoplasy.  I did not have any mesh used.  I have been recovering well but still taking ibuprofen and can’t sit really well.  I can’t pick up either of my kids yet and have been told i shouldn’t pick up my daughter (the 2 yo, who weighs 30 lbs) until 6 weeks after surgery!!  When can I expect to feel “normal” again and what is a realistic assessment of when I’ll be able to do any heavy lifting?  I guess I just want to hear some success stories because everything I hear is about failure rates!!

1 like, 16 replies

Report / Delete

16 Replies

Next
  • Posted

     Good luck with recovery. I think your success stories come from people who have already left this forum most likely. A lot of people follow this when they have issues. That may be why you struggle to find good stories. I am five months post op and  still struggle to sit because of pain.  I still cannot lift over 4 pounds without an issue. I’m still in pain but I think something went wrong with the surgery so hopefully yours goes better. I know lifting puts a lot of pressure on the surgery and the point of not lifting is  not put pressure on the surgery until it heals properly and cause it to fail. The last thing you want to do is do this all over again. At six weeks there was no way I could lift even 2 pounds. I know the doctors tell you six weeks is the magic pill to everything will go all right, but I haven’t found anybody that had that be realistic. Sorry.
    Report / Delete Reply
  • Posted

    I had cystocele stage 3 and rectocele stage 2 surgery last May. I was 63. My biggest frustration was not doing anything strenuous and having to wear a menstrual pad for 7 weeks. Other than that, I had mild menstrual like pain and a feeling of pressure if I stood for too long. My recovery otherwise went smoothly and I gradually resumed to normal activities. Please do not over do it in the first 6 weeks because of the dangers of undoing what the surgeon has done. All the best to you and your little family!
    Report / Delete Reply
    • Posted

      Thanks, Kaleah!  Yes, it’s so frustrating to have to just sit around and not be able to really help with the kids. I have stairs in my house and I’ve been told I’m not allowed to go up and down them while carrying my baby before my doctor sees me at the 4-week mark. But I will do my best to follow all the directions and take it easy.  That seems to be the most important thing.
      Report / Delete Reply
  • Posted

    Hi there. Im 26 years old, 2 kiddos and 13 weeks post op and feel fabulous. I try to post about my experience in as much detail as possible to show that theres success stories... you can find my posts for references if interested.

    I think the general guideline given to women in the uk (the majority of this board i believe) is never to lift over 25lbs again. Im in the u.s. and was told (in regards to lifting my 30 lb toddler) that if i dont have to hold my breath to lift her, then its OK... in other words it depends on your level of strength. At first i was as cautious as possible, disregarding my american doctor for fear of failing, but i was back on my feet very quickly and just listened to my body and quickly became aware of what i can and cant do. Example, lifting my muscular toddler is a sinch, a similar weighted bag of dog food?.. not a

    chance.

    I saw a great womens physio for a year leading up to my surgery, who taught me that pelvic floor strength is a combination of different muscle groups working together. For example, after healing my diastis recti i saw improvements in my floor strength. Well the major groups would be your core and legs. Your core does a lot for your pelvic floor but your core needs a solid foundation to rest on, and thats your legs. So building strength in your thighs through squats(pre surgery, not something ive done since) lunges, clams, butterflies, will carry the pelvis in such a way that provides stability to your pelvis and core. Often overlooked is your inner thigh muscles which vastly helped improve my symptoms of a whacky pelvis. I was always walking with my bum sort of tucked under my pelvis, throwing everything out of whack. She knew my problems right when i walked in just by seeing how my feet pointed out when i walked (a connection to weak inner thighs, which would shake just from sitting on my front steps..)

    To be continued... my baby is demanding boobie...

    Report / Delete Reply
    • Posted

      Jenex, I’m in the US too!  So good to hear from you!!  When I go see my doctor for the 1-month follow up he is going to prescribe PT for me to work o strengthening my pelvic floor.  The thought of not being able to ever pick up my kids again is what worries me the most (we’ll, that and having a failed surgery and recurrence of this prolapse).   I mean, I’m not looking to walk miles holding my kids but i would like to, at some point, be able to again pick them up when needed— like to get them in and out of a crib or onto the changing table.  It gives me so much hope to hear that I might be able to work my way to that.   Have you been able to work out at all?  If so, what kinds of things can you do?  I was told running is a big no-no after surgery...
      Report / Delete Reply
    • Posted

      I think ive always been allergic to exercise... i just started to come around to weight training because i hate cardio so much and after baby #2 could no longer call myself naturally thin. I tried to get as much pilates and my pathetic version of weight training in as possible before my surgery, knowing that id have to take it easy while scar tissue formed but wanting to set my self up for good post op results. Im in no way a gym rat (i think ive been twice) but the simple exercises i learned at the therapists are great because they are not load baring, so its safe for prolapse and healing for diastis recti (a gap between your ab muscles caused by pregnancy). Even when your prolapse or diastis recti is "gone" youre going to need to do safe exercises as though you were symptomatic.

      The workouts i do, you can find on youtube by typing in "core exercises for prolapse" or "core exercises for diastis recti" both of which are generally with you lying down and using your legs as the weight to strengthen your core, in turn strengthening your legs as well.

      I felt back to normal around 2 weeks post op and was completely free of twinging pains or dull aches by 6 weeks. I carry my youngest around a lot, squat to pick her up, and have had no problems.

      I specifically had a rectocele repair with slight building up of my perineum. Hope this info has been helpful to you! Feel free to write me any time!

      Report / Delete Reply
  • Posted

    Hi Restless. Sorry to hear you have had to have surgery. I’m 14 weeks post op and feel pretty much back to my old self now.

    Please please be careful. If you allow healing and rest as much as possible your surgery will have the best chance of success. Basically after this surgery we should not be lifting heavy weights ever - over15kg.

    I still am very aware of I lift a heavy pan when cooking. You can feel if it’s not good so listen to your body. Healing is not complete until 12 weeks sndtotal healing and regained tissue strength takes up to a year. Beat that in mind when everything feels normal.

    If I sit on a hard surface I am aware of discomfort internally. At 7 weeks I sat to eat Christmas. Dinner on a dining chair with a thick soft cushion.

    I took pain killers for around four weeks on and off.

    Sit with your children to hug them and take care. Wishing you all the very best. There are lots of successful stories out there.

    Just remember that pelvic load from lifting will increase the risk of repeat surgery being necessary .

    Report / Delete Reply
    • Posted

      Thanks paddiwhack!  Actually, 15kgs is a lot!!  Have you had to go back to work?  I have an office job and bought a cushion that’s supposed to take pressure off the coccyx and pelvic floor.  I’m hoping that’s enough!!
      Report / Delete Reply
    • Posted

      I defin wouldn't be lifting your toddler at 6 weeks love. You ate at risk of doing a lot of damage. Your body doesn't makes strong scar tissue till around 12 weeks and then its way to soon. I'm in uk and we are always told the first3 months no lifting. Good luck to you all.

      Report / Delete Reply
    • Posted

      I am working part time. We run our own business so I’m doing about 3-4 hrs a day. I’m not lifting at all at the moment 15 weeks on. I’ve just started ironing small quantities and not hoovered.moppeds d that was ok. I find bending uncomfortable and sitting on hard chairs.

      I certainly couldn’t work full time but I have ME too so it’s a juggle 

      Report / Delete Reply
  • Posted

    hi dear how you are coping am in same situation as you are but i dont want an opeartion 

    i have 5 year and 2 month old

    dont know how my future will be

    please suggest something

    Report / Delete Reply
    • Posted

      Subha21- Not sure how bad your prolapse is.  I personally couldnt live with that situation anymore.  The bulge was very bothersome for me (stage 3 cystocele).  I also had a stage 1 rectocele and an enterocele.  So, for me, surgery was the best option.  I figured that either way (with or without surgery) I would have to make changes in the physical activities i would be able to do in the future but at least my day-to-day would be better with the surgery.  

      If your prolapse is not interfering with your quality of life, you can try kegels and pelvic floor exercises.  That can definitely help a lot!  Have you been fitted for a pessary?  That’s an option too.

      Report / Delete Reply
    • Posted

      ya i ahve fitted the pessary yesterday but still no improvement have really bad back pain dont know how long we can live with this am really worried how was your opeartion dont want to go for opearation raelly scared can i live with pessary and exercises how you are coping your 3 month old its hard where r u based in uk or us
      Report / Delete Reply
    • Posted

      I’m in the US.  I’m now 3 weeks post op and it wasn’t that bad.  The first week was uncomfortable and I slept a lot.  My in laws came and my husband took off from work and they basically ran the household.  Second week I felt progressively better.  In the third week now I’m taking ibuprofen when needed (about once or twice a day) and have gone back to driving (albeit with an ergonomic seat cushion).  I pick up the baby 2-3 times in the night to feed him but I don’t carry him around or anything.  I haven’t picked up my daughter at all and don’t intend to for another month.  So the activity restrictions are the worst part.  The pain is really not too bad.  

      I’m sorry you are struggling!  A lot of people end up finding they can live with the pessary and doing pelvic floor exercises.  That just wasn’t my case.  I haven’t regretted doing the surgery yet. 

      Report / Delete Reply
  • Posted

    Hi I have send you the private message check it out
    Report / Delete Reply

Join this discussion or start a new one?

New discussion Reply

Report or request deletion

Thanks for your help!

We want the forums to be a useful resource for our users but it is important to remember that the forums are not moderated or reviewed by doctors and so you should not rely on opinions or advice given by other users in respect of any healthcare matters. Always speak to your doctor before acting and in cases of emergency seek appropriate medical assistance immediately. Use of the forums is subject to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy and steps will be taken to remove posts identified as being in breach of those terms.

newnav-down newnav-up