Glaucoma - new to this, worried, need info/advice

Posted , 6 users are following.

This discussion has been locked due to a period of inactivity. Start a new discussion

Hi,

I was diagnosed with glaucoma by the GP clinic just yesterday and given a refferal to a specialist in 3 weeks. I was actually diagnosed by accident. I had gone to check why my right eye suddenly had clear near vision and astigmatism at distance vision.

Both eyes were checked for pressure. As it turns out my left eye for which I didnt have any complaints had a pressure of 23. ( max should be 21 ). Frankly I feel nothing at all in my left eye, which has 6/6 vision.

 I haven't been given meds cause at GP level maybe they can't.

I'm kind of worried reading about this stuff. I have no symptoms at all in this eye. Should I quickly try to bring foward my appointment somehow.

Is 23 reading very serious?  Could it be a temporary thing? I've been under a lot of stress lately and my blood pressure on the day of this checkup was a little high. Usually its upper normal or less. Could that have cause a high eye pressure reading.

The last time I did a routine eye checkup was 10 years ago. Then pressure in both eyes were normal. ( I'm in my late 50s, I dont smoke, drink and am not obese )

Any advice and comments much appreciated.

 

0 likes, 20 replies

Report

20 Replies

Next
  • Posted

    Go to an eye specialist and take ALL the test.  Glaucoma is nothing to play with.  It's best to catch it early.  Yes it is scary; but losing your sight is worse.  I did not know I had it until I noticed flashing lights in front of my eyes...go to a specialist not just a eye glass place.

    Report
  • Posted

    Hello

    As you said you had been in stress you could just go ahead and check pressures again after some time.No 23 isn't high pressure .Did they find any changes in the optic nerve? If not then glaucoma diagnosis cannot be done what can be called is occular hypertension.

    All the best

    Report
    • Posted

      Surabhi ,

      Thank you for replying. This was a GP clinic that I went to so the check was using someting called a tonometer which I looked into and was told to stare at a red dot.

      The detailed exam would probably be done at the specialist which I have been reffered to in 3 weeks.

      Yes, i've been under much stress as a caregiver and its been intense these few months. I've also just had a throat/sinus  infection/allergy that I just recovered from. I don't know whether these things play a role.

      Would you know?

      I take omeprazole sometimes for reflux. Could this be a problem? Couldn't find any contraindiction on the internet though.

       

      Report
    • Posted

      Allergies sinus infection and all can raise pressures in the glaucomatic eye may be but again in your case it's yet not a confirmed glaucoma so why to worry .

      Relax and do some meditation and breathings till u see an expert.

      Report
  • Posted

    I would not worry too much about it (hard not to, I know).     Your GP will not know whether you have glaucoma, or not!   You will need to be checked by a specialist.   In 1990, at the age of 48, I went through the same thing, with pressures of about 27.

    The specilaist told me that I did not have glaucoma, but interocular hypertension (pressure too high - no damage to optic nerve).     I had regular checkups for 7 years before they put me on drops after it went up to 30.     Over the years, the pressure has varied, often around 24, but occasionally up to 34, requiring a change of drops - no pain or visual symptoms.     After I quit alcohol in November 2015, it has gone down to 16 and 18.    No-one suggested, or told me to stop, I just decided on the spare of the moment.   Before that, I had three glasses of white wine each evening, but none at all on Wednesdays.    I can see very well, and at my last checkup a few weeks ago, they confirmed that I still do not have glaucoma.     Just passed the over age 73 DVLA sight test without any problems.   Just be thankful that they have found out about the slightly elevated pressure before any symptoms appear.   They should be able to deal with it, and you may not even be put on drops at all, if you have what I have.    Let us know how you get on with the specialist.   Good luck!

    Report
    • Posted

      Thank alcantra for telling me about interocular pressure. I got the word "glaucoma" from the refferal letter the GP wrote to the specialist.

      Strangely the eye in question, the left eye has incredible distance vision. Better than that 35 years ago when i needed 100 degree glasses in the lecture hall. Don't know what that means though.

       

      Report
    • Posted

      Hi Patrick, the tonometer was very inaccurate detecting my eye pressures. The specialist has a much better machine, the tonometer said my pressure was 33 and the better instrument measured it at 26. I saw an optometrist 10 years ago and the pressure was 23, he said it was boarderline needing drops. 3 months ago i was diagnosed with severe glaucoma losing 30 percent of my vision. While i have lost the vision my eye can still read the smallest print on the eye chart-
      Report
    • Posted

      There are no warning signs like pain or anything to alert you to optic nerve damage. The 2 main types are open angle or closed angle, apparently closed angle is affected by medications like tricyclic antidepressents and others increasing the pressure.  The good eye compensates for the bad eye so you dont realise you have lost vision. 23 is pretty low for glaucoma but different people can tolerate different pressures before nerve damage occurs.
      Report
    • Posted

      Mikehaust,

      Thanks for the info. Just wondering was the tonometer consistantaly wrong, ie, with both eyes and equally wrong or just one eye.

      I'm sorry for you vision loss issues. Wish the best for you.

      Report
    • Posted

      I would think if it was innacurate, it would be incorrect for both eyes!    Just over a year ago, I had a pressure test at a high street optemetrist and the pressures were 28 and 32!    I was referred immediately to the hospital where he (the optemetrist) said I required an "immediate" Trabeculectomy where they cut small holes in the eyes to let the pressure out.    Very alarming.    But I did note that he had me heaving on the toneometer handles on either side of the device with all my strength.    I have never had to do that before and I have had numerous pressure tests since 1990.   At the hospital, the pressures were perfectly OK again.   I mentioned the fact that I had been told to pull on the handles with all my strength.   The consultant was very surprised at that, and said that had no doubt driven the pressure up artifically on a temporary basis.    On the next two hospital visits, spaced at six months apart, the pressures have continued to go down.      I had been sent to the optemetrist to be monitored for pressure, as the hopsital considered I was not a high risk patient.     I am firmly convinced that the optemetrist did not want to be stuck with me and made me pull on the handles to put the pressure up and give them an excuse to put me back on the hospital monitoring again!

       

      Report
    • Posted

      Well i could hope that the tonometry was wrong but it wouldn't explain why one eye was normal at 18. Both should be higher in that case.

      Similerly I was recovering from a sinus infection with partially blocked nasal passages but again if that explain one high reading it wouldn't explain why the other one was normal. As for heaving I was doing some deep breathing exercises while waiting to bring down my blood pressure which was inexplicably high that day. Again it doesn;t explain the one normal reading then.

      By the way is there any harm in frequent tonometry. I guess if its just a puff of air it shouldn't be a problem?

      By the way,

      Report
    • Posted

      They are rarely the same pressure.    You can have it high in one eye, and much lower in the other.     For instance, if your actual eye pressures were 18 and 15 on an accurate tester,  an innacurate one may show  17 and 14 or 19 and 16 or some other figues that were both consistant with the testers i.e. both eyes on the innacurate ones out by the same amount for each eye.  The puff of air tester is not as accurate as the one at the one the hospital uses.   In the hospital one, they will put an anaesthetic drop in your eyes.     They then advance a blue light probe that touches the front of your eye to read the pressure.    You don't feel a thing when they do this, but it is a bit disconcerting the first time.     I doubt if it does any harm.   Anyway, your pressures aren't alarmingly high so I would just keep calm and see what the consultant has to say about it! 

      Report
    • Posted

      Hi i also had my first test at an optometrist with a puff tester, they said i had pressures of 23 and 33 and i was refferred to a hospital which revealed pressures of 26 and 33 with their hand held tonometer, the dr then tested with the accurate machine wit the probe and blue light which revealed pressures of 20 and 26. I went to a specialist a 3 days later and the handheld tonometer gave a reading of 23 and 30 then the accurate machine gave a reading of 21 and 26???   it seems the handheld tonometers are highly inaccurate from my experiance
      Report
    • Posted

      It would seem that even the puff ones used were not accurate. The margin of error is so wide it can't even be called an estimate. One wonders than why they even use it.

      By the way internet search shows that eye pressure changes throughout the day ( the GP told me it doesn't ).

       

      Report
    • Posted

      Hi Pat, im not sure if those testers are just inaccurate on my eyes ??? i also heard the pressure changes throughout the day. I read somewhere that it takes 15 years with a pressure of 21to25 and 7 years with a pressure of 25to30 and 3 years at over 30 to go blind
      Report
    • Posted

      Everyone appears to be different.   My pressures have been hovering around the 25 mark for 26 years and I still have full visual fields and excellent vision.   As I said before, it has fallen in the last year to 18 and 16.      My consultant said they have some patients with glaucoma with perfectly normal pressures, whilst others have had pressures round about 30 for years with no ill effects, and it is really "the luck of the draw!"    Consultant also says that pressures change throughout the day and lifting heavy weights puts it up short term, but not harmful if it is only short duration!

      Report

Join this discussion or start a new one?

New discussion

Report as inappropriate

Thanks for your help!

We want the forums to be a useful resource for our users but it is important to remember that the forums are not moderated or reviewed by doctors and so you should not rely on opinions or advice given by other users in respect of any healthcare matters. Always speak to your doctor before acting and in cases of emergency seek appropriate medical assistance immediately. Use of the forums is subject to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy and steps will be taken to remove posts identified as being in breach of those terms.

newnav-down newnav-up