Good result

Posted , 2 users are following.

This discussion has been locked due to a period of inactivity. Start a new discussion

Underwent nerve conduction studies this morning due to ocassional numbness in feet.   Doc was surprised by the results considering I'd been diabetic for 17 years.   She told me damage was miniscule and the results were better than most non diabetics.   Cause, apparently, is from meds for RA.

0 likes, 8 replies

Report

8 Replies

  • Posted

    Hi tony09890,

    It is good news that the nerve conduction tests revealed that the numbness isn't as a result of peripheral neuropathy, sir.  I say this as I'm in the position that I can no longer feel anything from just below my knees to my toes.  The 'problem' for you now, though, is getting your doctor to find an alternative medication for your RA ... if one exists, that is.

    Do be aware, sir, that although you don't have neuropathy at the moment, this doesn't mean that it couldn't develop at some point in the future.  You, therefore, still need to pay attention to ANY change in sensations that you feel.  Check your feet daily, too, as if your feet do become numb you are less likely to 'feel' when anything goes wrong.  (I've looked after diabetic patients in the past, one of whom had a drawing pin stuck firmly into the sole of her foot, and she hadn't even known that anything was amiss.)

    I wish you well, sir, and hope that your doctor is able to find an 'answer' to the numbness that you're experiencing.

    Mick

    Report
  • Posted

    Goes without saying for diabetics I guess.   I also got excellent results from a recent eye test.   The reason you have these type of tests is to see the effect diabetes is having on your body.   I'm under no illusion that diabetes will not eventually catch up with me, although at the moment I think the RA will win the race.
    Report
  • Posted

    Excellent news, tony09890, about your recent eye test too.

    I may not know you, sir, but I'm truly glad that you're not, apparently, being bothered with diabetes-related complications.  Sadly, I can't say the same for me.  I've developed a number of complications over the years.

    Report
  • Posted

    That's no good Mick, complications are usually linked to poor control.   I'm a bit of a control freak so don't like anything controlling me - diabetes included.   For the last 10 years or so I've been using the carb counting method, testing regularly and until recently exercising regularly, perhaps that has something to do with my luck so far.  Carb counting, I think, has worked very well for me.   If you're not counting carbs give it a shot - it can't hurt.   I wish you luck my friend - look after yourself!
    Report
  • Posted

    You ARE, of course, absolutely right, Tony, with your assertion that poorly-controlled DOES increase the risks that a diabetic might go on to develop complications.

    Like yourself, I wasn't going to let diabetes control my life.  Unfortunately, I went in the opposite direction to yourself and, initially, denied that I could possibly have diabetes, and even when I accepted it, went against the 'rules'.  (I found it difficult to accept that I had diabetes as I had always been 'super-human' fit.  I'd just left the British Army when I found out that I had it, and was continuing to run marathons, wearing a bergen (rucksack) full of housebricks, to raise money for various charities.  Obviously, at that time I didn't know there was a difference between type 1, type 2 and the various other types of diabetes.)

    When I was diagnosed I was told that I was a 'brittle' diabetic.  In days gone by this meant that you had wildly swinging blood glucose levels, though in more modern times it tends to refer to people who simply have poor blood glucose control.

    I've been counting carbohyrate content of foods and drinks ever since I was diagnosed diabetic ... some 35+ years ago ... so I don't know any 'other' way.  I've been using a pump since 1998, and this allows me to give more precise insulin infusions in order to cover even smaller snacks, meals or drinks.

    I thank you, sir, for wishing me luck.  I, honestly, do try my best, though it's a lot more difficult nowadays.  (I have a hospital bed at home, arranged by my endocrinologist, can't walk far now, even with elbow crutches, and need to use a wheelchair to get very far ... signs, I'm afraid, of just some of the things that can happen to you if you don't keep on top of things.)

    Use me as an example of what NOT to do, sir, and make sure you DO keep on top of things.

    Best of luck to you, Tony.

    Take care of yourself, my new-found friend.

     Mick

    Report
  • Posted

    Well that's inetersting, we seem to have travelled down a paralell path:   I was a police dog handler in the RAAF for 25 years which is quite a physical job, I was also a bodybuilder and that coupled with running, power walking, cycling, camoeing, rock climbing and various other physical pursuits took an enormous toll on my body - my wife always though I was hyperactive.   I've only been diabetic for 17 years so perhaps I will end up in the same position as you, although I think the RA will finish me off sooner.   Rather annoying, the life I have lead and now due to RA I cannot exerscie or really do anything now.   Life is a total bitch!.
    Report
    • Posted

      My apologies to you, Tony, for taking so long to respond.

      As you seem to be doing a better job than I ever did at controlling blood glucose levels, sir, there's every chance that you will NOT end up in the same position that I now find myself ... at least, not from diabetes.  (I'm afraid I don't know enough about RA to comment ... even though my own wife suffers with it, though not, apparently, to the severity that you do.)

      It's funny that you should mentin having served in the RAAF, sir.  I met a guy in Belize (Central America) who'd deserted from the RAAF and was living in the jungle (rainforest) with a native Belizean woman.  He was a great guy who offered us information on native plants that we could use to survive on.  He even got his partner to cook some iguanas for us as our own methods of preparing and cooking them for ourselves was almost a disaster. ;-)

      Don't look on the negatives of how life is treating you, Tony.  Look at what you are still capable of doing.

      Be well, sir.

       Mick

      Report

Join this discussion or start a new one?

New discussion

Report as inappropriate

Thanks for your help!

We want the forums to be a useful resource for our users but it is important to remember that the forums are not moderated or reviewed by doctors and so you should not rely on opinions or advice given by other users in respect of any healthcare matters. Always speak to your doctor before acting and in cases of emergency seek appropriate medical assistance immediately. Use of the forums is subject to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy and steps will be taken to remove posts identified as being in breach of those terms.

newnav-down newnav-up