GRAHAM06392

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hello all i am new on here.my oxegen level is anything from 94 to 96 my doctor told me that with moderate copd that is fine.i asked her if she thought i would ever end up on oxegen she said because i packed in smoking 9 years ago then she said she dont exspect me to end up on oxegen do any one agree. i am 57

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  • Posted

    As long as you don't go back on the fags, avoid people with colds or flu, eat healthily, learn how to breath properly ('Pursed lip' breathing and 'Buteyko' breathing can both be found on Youtube), walk every day, and take whatever meds prescribed .. Yes .. from what I've read here and elsewhere, I'd tend to agree.

    Jo

     

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  • Posted

    Hello Graham

    I do not agree.

    Because COPD is a progressive illness that affects everyone differently.

    While it is absolutely great you have stopped smoking, and that fact alone makes a huge difference for the better, the fact is, that if your COPD does advance enough you will require oxygen in the future.

    No one can predict that you for sure will not nor can anyone predict you will for certain, but statistics and the nature of the disease would indicate everyone with COPD is likely to require oxygen at some point, even if soley during exacerbations, if not on a continuous basis.

     

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    • Posted

      Well that's telling us! Could you kindly expand on the "statistics and nature of the disease"
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    • Posted

      I am not sure what your confusion is.

      COPD is an advancing and incurable disease. As it progresses, it will cause heart failure, pulmonary hypertension and further changes to the alveoli in the lungs, all which would cause hypoxia.

      Oxygen will be necessary for any person who has oxygen saturations below 90%, specifically near 88% or less on a continuum. Even if activity causes that much of a drop in oxygen levels, oxygen is needed, along with other interventions in order to breath and, also, for comfort and to help prevent further lung damage.

      Not sure what else you are asking.

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    • Posted

      Thanks. I was also asking about statistics. I do not think it is helpful to refer to my polite enquiry as confusion. The original poster, Graham, who is new to all this, certainly does not need your prophecy of doom. Sorry if I am violating the rules by getting too personal.
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    • Posted

      People have a right to know the answers to the questions they ask. One can presume that is why one asks the question in the first place.

      However, I will not offend you any more.

      Good day.

       

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    • Posted

      Well, sorry if I'm also "violating the rules" by jumping in here, but I reckon it's a bit unfair to refer to someone's honest and accurate response as a "prophecy of doom":  personally I'd prefer that to some pollyanna giving me false reassurance just to make me feel better in the short term.

       

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    • Posted

      Please don't get put off responding again:  your response was realistic and to the point, and in my opinion much more useful to the questioner than the doctor's false reassurance that h/she'll never need oxygen when there's absolutely no way of knowing that
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    • Posted

      I was diagnosed back in 1992 ,,,,,and  have needed oxygen when in hospital or on an air flight to our holidays ,,, I've worked so hard at the gym ( with my limitations) to avoid the need of oxygen ,that has been my main aim since diagnosis 
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    • Posted

      Thanks for that the% figures and explanation is very helpful. Onky said my oxygen level was ok at 97% so I didn't need oxygen. Didn't mention anything else. But telling me that with no explanation did mean anything to me, all I know is that walking any more than 15 steps I need to sit or rest somewhere as I am out of breath.

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  • Posted

    Hi ,your levels are really good ,I was diagnosed back in 1992 ,and my levels are about the same as yours then and now ,the best thing you can do is keep of the smoking,and ask your GP to refer you to pulmary rehab group, I've been going since 2008 ,it's a six week course of education and light exersise,trust me ,,after the course please do what I did and keep going to the gym ,you won't regret it .when I was diagnosed ,,,,I was ,,,and still am determined not to be the lady attatched to an oxygen cylinder,I'm now aged 70(in January) and love going to the gym twice a week ,so good luck and keep positive,best wishes 
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  • Posted

    Sorry to say it, I reckon she's giving you false hope.   When you stopped smoking is irrelevant if you now have COPD and as far as I know we'll end up on oxygen at some stage if we live long enough, some of us sooner and some later.

    They are certainly good oxygen levels now.   Has she also referred you for rehab to learn how to manage your COPD?   While it's not curable it's certainly manageable:  my oxygen levels are similar to yours and I've kept my lung function % at the same level for more than 3 years since diagnosis - I'm 69 and smoked for 40 years.

    Most of us go into panic mode when diagnosed, myself included, but I'm now grateful I don't have something worse (yet??!!) given how much poison I put into my own body for so many years.

     

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  • Posted

    I think that the most important thing you can do, Graham .. is to stay positive. You have mild COPD .. thankfully, you've been diagnosed early and it's eminently manageable if you follow all the 'rules' (mentioned above).

    The disease IS progressive as Lill said .. but you can slow down that progression with good management.

    If you look after yourself .. it'll probably be many years before you need ogygen to get you through the day.

    Look after yourself.

    Jo

     

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  • Posted

    I think the chances are that you won't to be honest.  Copd is a progressive disease but most people can hold it steady or only progress very slowly so old age will probably get you first.  A few unlucky people do progress quickly but most don't.  I think if you have other serious health conditions it can have an impact on your copd and it could be a factor in quicker progression.  x
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  • Posted

    I've rarely seen so much common sense in replies to a single query. Essentially the answers you are looking for and getting here is 'nobody can tell how it will go for you, but there is a LOT you can do to help yourself, and that alone will give you a positive outlook'. By giving up smoking you have done the hard part, now pay attention to the rehab,sensible eating and exercise life-long.
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