Had a blood test - Ferritin, Folate and B12 - what do these numbers mean?

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Hello 

I had a blood test about three and a half weeks ago. I was expecting the results within the week but since then half of the surgery's doctors have been off sick. I have no idea when my bloods will be commented on (have called every day as the receptionist tells me to "call back tomorrow"). 

I asked for the numbers. Does anyone know what these mean? 

Ferririn: 83

Folate: 10.0

B12: 3.70

Very grateful for comments. 

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  • Posted

    hi Molly. do u have any letters with those numbers i.e. ng/mL or similar. if not, ask the receptionist as different numbers depend on the letters to indicate normal levels.

    Caitlin.

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    • Posted

      Ah! Didn't realise there should be letters too. 

      Called back and the results are as follows: 

      Ferritin: 83 ng/l

      Folate: 10.0 ng/l

      B12 370 ng/l

      Thanks, 

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    • Posted

      hi Molly. thank u for that. so sorry to hear ur at the mercy of sick GP's - think that viral epidemic must have caught up with ur local practice. hope they & u are back to health shortly. i'll do the feedback in bite size portions:

      Folate is a vitamin found primarily in green leafy vegetables. A synthetic version known as folic acid can also be found in fortified foods. Folate deficiency can lead to hyperhomocysteinemia, a condition which exists in about 5% of the population and is associated with increased risk for cardiovascular, neurodegenerative diseases, autoimmune disorders, type 2 diabetes, renal disease, osteoporosis, neuropsychiatric disorders, anemia, and cancer. normal levels r age and gender realted. normal adult female levels r: 3-15 ng/mL. it works synergistically with b12. they are interdependent in keeping levels normal. if Folate is low, b12 may also be low.

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    • Posted

      Vitamin B12 is also known as cobalamin. this nutrient is only found in amimal foods - red meat/dairy/Eggs/Fish. it's a vital vitaminm involved in a wide range of metabolic processes. Inadequate vitamin B12 intake can lead to what's called 'megaloblastic macrocytic anemia', FATIGUE +++ weakness, loss of appetite, constipation, depression and mania. Severe deficiency can damage the nervous system, leading to memory loss, numbness and tingling in the extremities, and dementia. the normal levels are considered to be between 200-900 pg/ml. however, ppl can present with symptoms, particularly neurological symptoms within the ''normal'' serum levels. with b12, it's what's in the tissues (rather than the serum i.e. blood) that's important and how efficently it's utilised. u may need to do some research on this one. lots of ppl on here with lots of info. on b12. also see what the PA society says about b12 deficiency. they have a help line if u need to talk to anyone about lowish levels.

      hope that's helpful Molly. looks as though ur within 'normal' parameters of all (Folate/Ferritin/B12) however, u could have symptoms of b12 deficiency at 370. - it's in the lower level of 'normal'. have a look at what NICE says re management/treatment of b12.

      Caitlin.

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    • Posted

      hi Caitlin,

      i am having twitchin muscules in all of my body 24/7. it started in my calf muscules i thing few years ago, specialy after doing sports. But in the beginnig i didnt pay attention to this. Now i start to worry, that its something serious. I did Brian MRI, EEG, and some blod tests, and all came to be normal. I am 35.

      But when i red your comets about Vitamin B12 test, and checked my resutls i saw that i might be deficiant.

      Please could u coment on my test results;

      Method;CMA; Sample type; Serum 

      Result; 248.00 

      Units; pmd/L

      Reference Range 133.00-652.00

      Thanns in advance!

       

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    • Posted

      Hi Gedas.

      while your b12 levels are within the UK normal levels, they are, however, in the lower levels of normal.  they are in what's called the 'grey' area. in this range (200-450) b12 symptoms can be present. however,  the Medics tend to 'diagnose' via the results of the serum blood test only,  rather than looking at the overall clinical presentaion/symptons i.e.  the muscle twitchings/spasms in your case.

      it would be advisable to ask your GP  for an ''Active b12 blood test''.  this test is marginally more accurate than the standard serum b12  test.  there are other tests too that can be done: 1)Homocysteine test 2)Methylmalonic test know as MMA to help support  the diagnosis one way or another. 

      i would suggest you have a look at Dr Chandy's website ''b12 deficiency''. he gives a list of symptoms via 'body systems'.  he also outlines the treatment protocol for ''neurological symptoms'' in b12 deficiency which is  1 mg  of b12 via intramuscular  injection on alternative days until no further improvement and then monthly. his website info. is very accessible. 

      other excellent sources of info. include the websites:  ''Healthunlocked'' in the Pernicous Anaemia Section (PAS).  it signposts to NHS etc info. sources & protocols. the forum is most informative and people supportive on there.

      C

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    • Posted

      Hey Caitlin, thanks a lot for speedy and accurate reply. i will ask for Active b12 test and will let u know the results.

      Gedas)

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  • Posted

    Ferritin is a protein in the body that stores iron. if ur levels are low, it indicates that there's not much spare iron in ur body and that ur vulnerable to becoming anaemic. normal levels range between: 12-150 ng.mL.
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  • Posted

    Wonderful, thank you very much for the detailed reply. I suspected that I would be quite anaemic at the moment - perhaps I'll just add some ferrous sulphate in the day. I've been diagnosed with iron-deficiency anaemia on and off for 17 years. 
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