Hate blood pressure meds

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Has anyone been able to get off blood pressure medicines through diet and exercise? I want to know if you can .

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  • Posted

    Hi whether you can get off meds will depend on your age, weight, health issues and if you have other congenital problems, why did your GP put u on them originally and how long ago.

    Also what strength and is it just one medication

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  • Posted

    Hi Julio, I would like to think so!! I posted recently that I am really fed up with the meds, having tried three lots I am so depressed at the thought of all these side effects for the rest of my life.  Mainly the dizziness and brain fog. I hope you manage to get off them and I too would love to know if anyone has through diet and exercise.

    best of luck.

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    • Posted

      Me too the side effects are what makes them not pleasant at all . And that's what I was wondering because one of my doctors believes I can do it . He is so positive and it's motivating.

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  • Posted

    Hi Julio, I have not personally but my 2 sons were able to get off with diet and exercise.  Losing weight can definitely help for some people. 
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    • Posted

      Do you mind me asking how old are your sons ? Because I am 32 years old and and I am at my heaviest I have been I weight 132 kg and my doctors tells me to try to loose 30 kgs and he thinks I would probably be able to get off meds
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    • Posted

      My oldest son is 44 and the youngest is 34. My oldest lost significant weight and learned to swim-began doing mini triathlons which really helped.  The youngest works out with strength training. I was surprised when he was taken off of BP meds. He has a stressful job. 
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    • Posted

      That's awesome . I need to learn how to properly swim t. This is a great idea to start excersising and I am glad they are doing great with out meds. I need to follow that path. This is so motivating for me to hear

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  • Posted

    Really does depend on the circumstances. For example, if you're in your mid-50s, generally good health, but put on meds by an over-zealous doctor because your BP was 145/90, I'd say you could do it with lifestyle methods instead. (I did at that age.) Acceptable levels of BP for older people have tended to rise in recent years according to most medical thinking, but some doctors still stick to the old rules.

    If, on the other hand, you're 35 and you had a starting BP of, say, 190/140 then forget coming off meds, or you'd be putting yourself in danger.

    That's not to say that lifestyle changes won't help even if you do have to take medication for the rest of your life. You might even be able to reduce the dose. By lifestyle changes I mean cutting down on salt, cutting back on carbs (and especially sugar, including sugary drinks), eating more green veg and oily fish, taking regular exercise (walking, cycling or swimming will do), stopping or at least cutting down on smoking, and losing weight if you need to - though all these measures will help with that anyway.

    But it really does all depend on your starting point.

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    • Posted

      My starting point is hard to determine because I suffer from anxiety also . There days when I had office visits and it's was 150s /high 80s but then there were also days that I was there at 180s/low 90s. And also that's part of the reason my doctor wants me to loose weight because exercise can help both and then he will determine if I can or can't. Or atleast reduce the meds

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    • Posted

      Sounds as if it might be possible to do this without meds, or at least on a reduced dose of meds. The diastolic is generally considered more important than the systolic, and high 80s or even low 90s isn't all that high. The 180 systolic could also be explained by anxiety.

      I'm wondering whether you have a home BP monitor so you can check your own BP from time to time, to see whether this is the well-known "white coat syndrome". Also wondering whether you've had 24-hour monitoring - the one where you wear a monitoring device for a whole day.

      132kg does sound pretty heavy, unless you're very tall and also an athlete. (Muscle weighs more than fat.) I think your doctor is right about losing some weight. When my BP got up to 150/90 in my mid-50s, I brought it down to 120/80 by losing a very modest amount of weight - only about 5kg - but then I wasn't as seriously overweight as you. It stayed there for about 15 years, but has recently started creeping up again.

      Better start that exercise programme straight away! It doesn't necessarily have to be in a gym. In fact, gentler exercise (e.g. brisk walking, cycling) done for an hour a day on at least five days a week is often more effective than a vigorous gym work-out once a week.

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    • Posted

      I am 6ft tall but yea I could use the weight loss. I do have white coat syndrome. I am going to try to eat healthier and work out I want to get my life back . Everything has been going backwards lately and I am only 32 so I am not old and I want to live healthier and happier .
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    • Posted

      Oh dear, yes - that gives you a BMI of >39, putting you dangerously near the morbidly obese level. Your health will certainly improve if you lose some weight. But like I said, don't go at it like a bull in a china shop, with aggressive exercising and dieting. Slow and steady weight loss is more sustainable.

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    • Posted

      I know it's hard because of my anxiety . I took lexapro for like 8 months and gained 15kg with out doing anything different. But I will get back on track . One day at a time

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