Heart disease progression

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Hi, I was diagnosed with a moderate mid LAD lesion a year ago and put on medication. My angiogram showed this as the only area of disease. The lesion progressed and 10 weeks ago I had a stent fitted with an excellent result. During my follow up with the cardiologist he told my that I have other areas of plaque but they have not progressed in the last year. However my latest angiogram shows another 2 mild blockages and I believe this shows rapid progression. I can't understand the discrepancy unless the 2 minor blockages were missed of the fist angiogram. Thoughts please?

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  • Posted

    Hello Mark. We live in an age where thankfully early diagnosis can certainly lead to prevention via effective treatments. One assumes you are on Statin therapy as a part of this? The "prevention" is to avoid the otherwise consequence of plaque build - up, myocardial infarction. Stents have continued to be effective as a part of this prevention. Once you have had an MI, unless you can get immediate clot-busting treatment, then you are on another pathway with long-term consequences. Keep up the vigilance and treatment.

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    • Posted

      Hi 68survivor,

      Thanks for the reply. Luckily I did not have a heart attack just shortness of breath. I am on statins etc and with a successful stent and my cardiologist informing me of no progression of other mild lesions I was hopeful I have the disease under control. The difference in angiogram has come as a shock as it appears the progression is a lot over a year. I didn't even think it was possible to develop a 30% blockage in that short time. I feel very stressed and wanted to know if it's possible a couple of minor narrowing s were not noted on the original report as it was done in an outpatient setting not a hospital. I would appreciate your thoughts on this thanks

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    • Posted

      Hello again Mark. It is possible, like all things human, to get differing interpretations as well as differing skill levels, sometimes dependent on setting. However in the not too distant future it is likely that some genetic assay will also become routine as part of the Cardiologists investigations. For instance Chromosome 6 can be involved in many cases of early plaque formation via some difference in cholesterol formation. It may be that genetic manipulation can provide the solution. I have been lucky to live and be helped by succeding leaps in skill/knowlege in cardiology and surgery. Not forgetting our excellent NHS in this country.
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  • Posted

    I don't know your age Mark, but I was told by my physician that plaque won't show up on angiogram until it's at the 50% degree, so that means a person could already have significant plaque before their first catheterization.  They used to say it took 3-4 decades before any plaque of any degree would accumulate.  Peoples' diets are different, but I don't believe saturated fats are the true culprit.  The Alaskan natives eat pure saturated fat when they eat blubber, and yet they have no coronary artery disease.  How do you explain that?  I've had 3 MIs, and they were all due to coronary artery vasospasms, and i have clear arteries, but mine were most likely caused by my autoimmune disease ( Lupus/RA)  Statins obviously are working for you, but many people develop memory problems, thus they can't or won't take them.  Good luck with your health.

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  • Posted

    Hi Mark, Heart disease is the leading cause of death for most people, helps you in knowing the real facts of the cardio problems, symptoms and preventions.

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