Help!!!

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HI

I am currently on 75mcg levothyroxine and my tsh being 0.3 and t4 at 17. It has been 3 months since the increase and I have slipped into depression and low energy again. I have three children and can't pay them much attention, in fact I ignore them and it's not fair on them. My doctor believes I should go onto anti depressants and I have started to consider them but still don't know what I should do. Has anyone been in the same position and if so what would you advise me?

Thank you

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  • Posted

    Hi there, I am the same as yourself, I have 2 young children, a full time job and study at college. Not only is this itself tiring I am also on 75 mcg thyroxine, mt TSH level is at 6.87 and T4 at 11.6, not sure whether these are high or not, but I too am constantly tired, very ratty and have no time for doing most things |I would.

    My housework suffers as I have no energy when I get in to do it, I do bits but not as much as I would like. I too get crabby with the kids, although the crabbitness is more directed at myself for not being able to do what they want when they want.

    I crave the energy that I had only 2 years ago, I also crave being the size 12 I was back then too :-).

    My only suggestion to you is to try and boost your energy levelks in other ways, green tea was recommended by my doctor and can't say if it works, i've not seen any major results yet ... i'm still waiting lol and just try and get some fresh air, don't stress and only do what you can, just make sure u reaffirm to the kids that your just tired and try and force yourself to do at least one thing with them in the day.

    I actually managed to bribe mine to do some housework the other day, that was our game (pretty good for them as they are both under 5 lol)

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  • Posted

    I was diagnosed hypothyorid 14 years ago and it is really a long and slow job to get the delicate balance right, with several blips along the way, which I have kept on top of by regular blood tests and reviews with my GP.

    Looking at your levels, Sarah, I would suggest that you ask your doctor for another blood test, as when my TSH was at 0.3, I was actually being overmedicated and went over to the hyperthyroid side. Strangely enough, I felt as if I needed more and felt in no way 'hyper'!.

    Leona, I think you also should have another test done as when my TSH gets over 6 and the T4 down to 11, I have benefited by an increase!

    Good luck, both!

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  • Posted

    Hi there Scriv

    I have had my meds increased again on Friday, i'm now up to 100mcg and I am getting tested again in 6 weeks.

    Can I ask, how long did it take you to get a balance, I am just starting to worry about mine, i'm getting married next year and don't wanna be the size I am now lol ... petty I know but a worry none the less.

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  • Posted

    Hi Leona

    It does take quite a while, as improvement happens slowly. From what I understand, the thyroxine you take has to be converted to a form the body can use. The cells then take up this and recover.. all this probably takes about 6-8 weeks for a true difference to be seen. I would imagine that you will feel a lot better in about 6 weeks and will continue to improve after that, all being well.

    I would imagine that you will be able to lose weight by next year for your wedding and may feel a different woman! One reason for weight gain in hypothyroidism is fluid retention and another is because we have no energy to try to work it off. Also, the metabolism slows down so much, so it is no wonder that the pounds pile on.

    Good luck, Leona.

    smile

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  • Posted

    I think that the best help I have received has been by reading a small book published in association with the BMA called Understanding Thyroid Disorders and written by Dr A Toft price approx £4 50. It can be got through Amzazon books, and he as well as being a very eminent endocrinologist also writes in very plain language explaining blood tests, and how the results relate to how well or not you feel. It also is supportive in helping you to approach your doctor about what he should be prescribing. I have both personally seen him and also given his book to my GP to read when he has underprescribed and said that he thought I was okay and was just depressed. The GPs usually seem very vague about the whole subject and need information given to them in a non threatening way which is very difficult when one as a patient is very unwell and feel like either turning on one's heels or alternatively shouting in despair at them. Neither of which helps much. Good luck. MVW
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