Help with lab results

Posted , 5 users are following.

I feel awful and as usual results in normal ranges. Would it be worth an increase in medication based on below?

T4 14.7 (range 10-24)

T3 4.2 (4-8.3)

TSH 1.98 (0.27-4.2)

Any advice would be appreciated

Thanks

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12 Replies

  • Posted

    I can relate to what you are saying. I too have normal values and they wanted to increase my med, but it didn't help me. I am changing my eating habits. One word of advice is do not eat cruciferous and goitrogenic vegetables. You can google a list online. I did test it out myself. I ate for 3 months...,  kale raw and cooked, broccoli,  cooked brussel sprouts, cole slaw on and on. My levels for TSH shot up to 13. T4 and T3 free was off as well. I went off all of the cruciferous for 3 months and coffee, and the levels went back to normal again. It can truly interfere with the symptoms, and with the performance of the med

    After many years of issues, my endocrinologist put me on a T3 med called Cytomel, as apparently I wasn't converting the T4 into T3 as synthroid ( a  T4 med ) is supposed to help accomplish. So I am taking a straight T3 and it goes right into the system. I feel much better, I look better, more energy. First time in a long time. My levels are steady now on the cytomel. Hope this helps. Oh and endocrinologists and primarys for the most part will tell you cruciferous and goitrogens won't interfere, but in some cases and I believe in most cases....it will. I proved that theory wrong myself. I also believe that some are taking too much medication, when if they changed eating habits and avoided some of these foods they would need less med, and the levels would stay steadier because of those changes. Hope you are doing better really soon. :-)

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    • Posted

      Hi lee, interesting post. Thanks. I found thecartificial sweetener, aspartame can also result in fluctuations.

      I agree with you that certain foods, particularly cruciferous are classified as goitrogens. I have found I become toxic with too much cabbage for sure. So I don’t eat much of those. I figure no need to add fuel to the fire.  

      But I’m not convinced eliminating the so called goitrogenic foods altogether is the answer. Afterall, they are providing some sort of nutrients that stimulate the thyroid. I have to wonder if the ‘goitrogens’ may be part of the solution rather than the problem.

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  • Posted

    Hi Caz, your TSH is 2, and the meds tend to lower it, so you still have a ways to go before your TSH gets too low. Your T3 is definately in the low end, and your T4 isn't much better.

    It would seem you would feel better if your thyroxin levels were midpoint or higher.

    However, raising your medication levels only temporarily boosts your levels, until your brain detects whats going on and your own TSH is supressed, which lowers your own production if thyroxin.

    Ideally, the meds would increase levels more than they suppress. But you know me, I’m not convinced that increasing the dose of medication increases benefits, though it definately increases side effects. Simply, the levothyroxin didn’t really work for me at any dose and caused some major problems. I don’t think I’m particularly unique.

    You could certainly try increasing the dose, knowing that you’ll get the initial spike, followed by a drop in TSH and the lag time. Maybe keep a log of your symptom levels now and review two months after raising the meds.

    Good luck!

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    • Posted

      The lower the TSH the lower the homocysteine levels in overt hypothyroidism. Both adequate levels of FreeT3 and FT4 are needed to lower homocysteine.
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    • Posted

      Catherine yes I am gradually learning that medication is only a small piece of the puzzle. Have you read the book "from fatigued to fantastic"? I'm currently reading it and it has some great insights into everything that affects hormones, thyroid, chronic fatigue, Fibromyalgia etc and how everything is linked

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    • Posted

      Thanks Caz, I’ll keep it in mind. Hesitant to bother with a book with such an optimistic name. I already been from fatigued to fantastic and back.

      Honestly, I’ve read so many books and studies. I don’t bother with the docs anymore- I’m so over having to tell them what tests to run, how tominteroret the tests, how to treat. What’s the point of that? 

      The last book I read was a while back- The Hormone Cure. I liked it because it offered a self diagnosis section and herbs for most endocrine problems. 

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    • Posted

      That was exactly what I thought about the title!! But it is so interesting and has a lot of self healing stuff in there too based on scientific research. Its been more helpful than any Dr appointments I've had put it that way!!

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  • Posted

    Thanks everyone for your responses. I may increase the meds slightly. I agree there are conflicting opinions on the vegetable side and I was told in small amounts and provided they are cooked rather than raw, I should be OK and things like fluoride in your Toothpaste will likely cause more damage to your thyroid than this food group ever will. I completely get that some foods (for me particularly gluten) completely set you back.

    Mar what are homocysteine levels? It's not a term I have ever heard of

    Thanks again

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    • Posted

      Guess you will have to google it bc my replies have been blocked. In general the lower your TSH the lower your homocysteine levels. Homocysteine is more of a marker for cardiovascular health than any cholesterol/lipid profile test.
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    • Posted

      Plain and simple you are UNDERmedicated and have lab results that prove it. People without thyroid disease usually have TSH at 1 or below. All my nonhypothyroid family members have TSH of 1 or below. My 60yo female neighbor has a TSH of .9. So why even question an increase? Being undermedicated is unhealthy. even if you took all the supplements.that benefit thyroid functioning.
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    • Posted

      Thanks Mar I thought that might be the case, my tsh has never been that high whilst on medication. Thanks I'll Google it!!

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  • Posted

    I had same problem. Turned out I had thyroid problems plus myasthenia gravis. Once the myasthenia was treated turned out the thyroid was actually under control. You could also have one of the numerous autoimmune diseases associated with hypothyroidism or some other condition. This exclusive focus on the thyroid cost me about 5 years of misery as I went through all the permutations of thyroid treatment anybody could think of.
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