Holiday Australia with COPD

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[size=18:1fc8e4960f]Hi im wondering if anyone can help me with some info please. I am planning to go visit family in Australia later this year, I have COPD and have never been abroad before.

I am wondering if it will make my copd worse.

Apart from when i had pneumonia, i have not had to have any oxygen therapy as yet.

I'm due to visit the practice nurse at the copd clinic for a review later this month, any info you guys could kindly give me would help me to ask the right questions when i go to see her.

Thanks in advance

Kind regards

Jeni[/size:1fc8e4960f]

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  • Posted

    Hi Reikijen,

    What a fantastic opportunity! As regards your COPD you will need to talk to your Doc or respiratory nurse and let them know this trip is in the pipeline. You may or may not need oxygen for your flight, but if it is a possibility then they will arrange for you to be tested etc.

    I personally have not flown since my diagnosis, but Jacee has and so she will know more than me about it - I'm sure she will share any knowledge about this with you once she has seen your post.

    Best wishes, Vanessa 8)

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  • Posted

    Hi Jeni,

    To set your mind at rest, visiting Australia (lucky you!!) should not make your COPD worse, in fact I find my breathing is always better abroad, where it is a bit warmer and the air may be cleaner (as I am by the sea).

    I DO use oxygen and have to ask the travel agent to arrange this for the flight (no charge with some operators). Some people who have low oxygen levels, though not low enough to use oxygen generally, do need it for the flight. Vanessa is right in advising you discuss this with your specialist nurse or consultant at the hospital (GP will not know). If your oxygen saturation level is borderline they will then be able to advise. Also, if the holiday company are unsure they will ask your nurse/consultant for a letter saying you are fit to fly so it's good if you have discussed this with them.

    I am not sure how honest you are going to be. I have heard that people who have notified their insurer of having COPD have either been denied cover or charged extortionately. As COPD is rarely an emergency, I just take antibiotics and steroids with me in case of chest infection and have so far had no problems, and I have been abroad 5 times since diagnosis. Hope this helps.

    Jacee

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  • Posted

    Hi vanessalee & Jacee thank you for your replies.

    As I am going to see the nurse for a review at the end of the month I will ask loads of questions then, I have got until November (I hope to go late Nov) to sort it all out.

    I’m not at all sure what to do about insurance, I have been told you should declare any pre-existing health conditions because should you need to see a doctor whilst away for whatever reason if you have not declared it beforehand they will not pay out. Someone I know said to me ok, what if you have a car crash and require treatment at a hospital, this treatment may have nothing to do with COPD but you will have to tell doctor at the hosp what medication your on because uniphylillin for example, is not compatible with certain antibiotics etc. When it comes to light that you have not declared it beforehand insurers may not pay out.

    Unfortunately I have two pre-existing conditions that I may have to declare, copd and a hiatus hernia. Hiatus hernia doesn’t bother me that much as long as I take my daily dose of Proton pump inhibitor to stop the acid. Since having had my gallbladder removed in 2004 I also suffer with irritable bowel like symptoms.

    I always take an emergency course of prednisolone with me even if I’m only visiting relatives; quite often the change of air can affect me and takes a few days to adjust. Last October I went down to Somerset, was coughing, wheezy and more out of breath than usual for a few days, it started to settle down couple of days before I came home. I think my lungs go through a period of shock being able to breathe in the fresher air (country air) :lol: I’m better if I go away for two weeks l :lol: get through the first 3 or 4 days of adjustment then can enjoy myself for the rest of the holiday.

    Im 53, have never flown or been abroad before, never even had a passport so this is all very new to me. smile

    Hubby says as I now struggle at night during a stuffy hot night, and have been known to kneel at he window to get some air, he is concerned how I will cope with the air and heat in Australia, he thinks something is bound to go wrong and is worrying, this is 1 reason why Iv never been abroad, have been chesty since childhood, and have been on steroids in some shape or form since 1968.

    My relative who lives Australia, has COPD and she is now 24/7 oxygen dependant, is poorly & quite elderly so this is why I’m going to see her now and why I’m travelling so far for my 1st ever trip abroad.

    I will let you know how things pan out and hopefully my post might help anyone else with similar predicament.

    Jen

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  • Posted

    [quote:d507896df0=\"ReikiJen\"][size=18:d507896df0]Hi im wondering if anyone can help me with some info please. I am planning to go visit family in Australia later this year, I have COPD and have never been abroad before.

    I am wondering if it will make my copd worse.

    Apart from when i had pneumonia, i have not had to have any oxygen therapy as yet.

    I'm due to visit the practice nurse at the copd clinic for a review later this month, any info you guys could kindly give me would help me to ask the right questions when i go to see her.

    Thanks in advance

    Kind regards

    Jeni[/size:d507896df0][/quote:d507896df0]

    Hi Jen - just doing a search this morning and your post comes up. Not sure if the information will be relevant to you but I have experience of Australia and have COPD.

    Depending on the time of year and the region you are flying to the climate may affect your COPD and ability to breathe.

    I don't tolerate humidity or extreme heat since being diagnosed with COPD. I lived in Australia pre COPD. It can get excessively hot up to 45C degrees mid summer (about December January time) and humidity in some parts is also very high.

    If you are planning on going in Oz summer time, I would recommend you stay in the shade when walking out and keep going into malls or shops with air conditioning to cool off as you may well be overwhelmed with the heat.

    You may tolerate Australia temps better in (June July) you should be able to check temperatures of the location you are going to at the time of year you intend to travel.

    Enjoy your trip - Australia is a wonderful country, I can recommend :D

    Good luck with your visit with the practise nurse. Maybe ask the nurse if it would prudent to take with you some anti bios when you travel in case you contact an infection whilst travelling.

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