Home monitoring for AFib

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I had one espisode of Afib last year. Am on Diltiazam and have not had any symptoms since.  What concerns me is asymptomatic AFib.  Does anyone know of a type of wristband that I can wear that would continuously monitor my heart rate and that would show asymptomatic episodes? 

Thank you 

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  • Posted

    I know what you are saying, however afib is always symptomatic in the form of an irregular heartbeat. You can feel your pulse every so often and tell if you are in normal sinus rhythm. Count twenty beats or so and if they are evenly spaced check it again in a couple of hours. Keep track of the times you are in afib and journal your feelings at the time. Then, in two years, throw the journal away and have fun. There are people on this site who would make a Faustian bargain to be asymptomatic. You are in wonderful shape. Hope it keeps up forever.
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    • Posted

      Thank you for your response.  I still wonder if people with AFib use those wrist monitors that connect to either an IPAD or IPHONE?  It would seem useful.

      Thank you and good health to you

      Paul

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  • Posted

    apparently I am in "asymptomatic afib" quite often,,, as opposed to the times when it's obvious that I'm in afib and those times when I'm not.  I got myself an Omron Blood Pressure machine that also tracks irregular heartbeat. I use it from time to time to find out why I'm feeling so weird.!!  Anyhoo:  I like Dr. John Madrone's advice.. he's a cardiologist who also has afib.  He's not selling anything.  He has some good tips so look him up on the web.  

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    • Posted

      Thank you for telling me that.  I already emailed him through his blog to inquire about any type of home monitoring that he might know of.

      Sincerely yours 

      Paul 

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    • Posted

      I use an OMRON BP760N that plugs into the  wall and also has batteries.. Some units don't come with the wall adapter and so if your batteries die you lose your history..  History is important if you want need to remember what's been going on so you can update your doctor!! I live in Canada.. OMRON is available here at many pharmacies. There are also other cheaper brands .. but you'd have to Google them and read reviews and comparisons with OMRON

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  • Posted

    Just one episode? Did it terminate by itself? How long was it? 

    You really dont need to worry at this stage about continuous monitoring with a device as Hanover says below. Alarming as a first episode can be, its not the end of the world. Live life normally. Have fun. Not sure about the Diltiazam, I coped with AF episodes for 15 years using a pill in the pocket strategy with flecainide... it became second nature.

    I found that using the two fingers index and middle finger of the right hand on my neck better than checking my wrist pulse. If you put both fingers up to your neck and push in until you find the pulse, quite close to the jaw bone for me. It's a louder and stronger beat than the wrist. Its then easy to feel whats going on. Your fingers go everywhere with you so better than a monitor although I did have that too. But it tended to confirm what I already knew. Latterly before the catheter ablations it was a cue to call for an ambulance! That was many many years later, I hasten to add.

    Currently clear of AF and enjoying life!

     

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    • Posted

      Mmmm......my first episode appeared as "asymptomatic" , as I also have fairly regular PVCs, so my rhythm is always irregular. Result was a tachycardia induced cardiomyopathy(severely enlarged left ventricle). I was lucky and it did resolve.

      I jumped out of rhythm three times about a year later and the only reason I knew was because my blood pressure machine (a microlife A200 AFIB) has an AF function which alerted to the fact that I was in AF. I take my blood pressure daily now to ensure I'm not in AF, that way I can be cardioverted immediately if I jump out, otherwise I'd have to go on blood thinners and wait for them to take effect before I could be cardioverted.

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  • Posted

    Hi phc10465,

     

    Myself totally asymptomatic afibber. My afib was found by chance. I’m MD and I have a noncommercial personal ECG.

    There are limitations of the bands.

    We tested several bands in parallel with ECG recordings.

    Important to emphasize that only ECG is suitable for afib identification. Afib has four hallmarks (irregularity, elevated heart rate, missing P waves and series of f or F waves. Bands detects only the first two (irregularity, elevated heart rate). Therefore you can’t differentiate afib from other arrhythmias as series of ectopics. aFibbers (including myself) often have ectopics and atrial ectopics even can initiate the fibrillation.

    Which band?

    Wristbands often have motional artifacts. My final chose was Scosche which can used both has wrist and armband mode. The armband mode is superior the wristband mode. The data from Scosche can be transmitted to smartphone via bluetooth or ANT+. I use for monitoring a free android compatible software – CARDIOGRAPH. This shows the pulse rate in real time and also produce a display plot of the time course (I often use this option for overnight monitoring). But anyhow the bands not discriminate the various arrhythmias. For the validation of aFib an ECG required. Actually the KARDIA is available for home use.

    Why monitor the silent atrial fibrillations?

    I absolutely agree with you, that silent atrial fibrillations must be monitored. Likely the silent events are more frequent, than we supposed. The common belief is that it is easier to prevent the fibrillation, than cure it. With rigorous monitoring one can follow the effectiveness of the therapy (including medication and lifestyle changings).

    Myself had typically 8-10 silent afib events per month. I had three so called major or reversible cases of atrial fibrillation: (overweight, high blood pressure and sleeping disorder). After approx. one year my weight has been reduced (still further reduction is needed), blood pressure is successfully managed by Ramipril and sleeping disorder is solved. After these changes the frequency of my afib event is reduced to 5 per month.

    I hopes these information were useful for you.

    Good luck:

    György1950

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    • Posted

      Thank you so much for your help.  My blood pressure is well under control and my heart rate is too with the Ca++ channel blocker.  I have lost 20 pounds, more to go, am on generic lipitor, with an excellent profile, eat fish at least three times a week in an effort to raise my HDL, and use a treadmill 20 min a day.  My AFib episode frightened me especially since it had a rapid ventricular response.  

      I have had these extra beats all my life but this time it triggered A fib I think.

      I will look into the wristband you mentioned, I see its on Amazon

      Sincerely 

      Paul

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    • Posted

      You use the same device for both purposes. The item arrives with a shorter (wrist) and a longer (arm) band.

      Wirst to look the video on Youtube:

      Scosche RHYTHM+ (Rhythm Plus) The BEST heart rate monitor?!

      All the best:

      György

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    • Posted

      I found the item on Amazon, I have an IPAD2 and I was told I can get an app where it would send information to.  I put the question of IPAD2 use to the Amazon community to see if anyone knows.  I dont have a smart phone but I do have an IPAD2.  

      Thank you so much for your help 

      Paul

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