How easy is it to learn intermittent catheterisation?

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How easy is it to learn intermittent catheterisation?   I have BPH but am not yet at the very restricted flow stage (~45cc prostate).  However, I also have a condition called interstitial cystitis for which I have a medication instilled into my bladder via an intermittent catheter every 4 weeks.  This is done by a urology nurse.  The literature for the medication says it is possible to self administer, so I wanted to find out if it is easy to learn and do you need a medical professional to teach you?    

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  • Posted

    It is easy to learn self-catheterisation, and especially so when you have already had at some time, an indwelling foley catheter, or have been intermittently catheterised by a nurse. If you have already been 'done' by a nurse, there is nothing more to learn really.

    I am a little puzzled why you actually want to do this, if it is only monthly. Is there any problem in showing up to see the nurse, who will take all the responsibility of using the medication and generally keeping an eye on you ?

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    • Posted

      I work as a contractor and whilst my current contract is quite close to my local hospital I know that won't always being the case.  And as this will be a long term treatment I would like to learn to self administer so I can manage it myself rather than being tied to a local appointment every 4 weeks.   I've not had a foley catheter, only the intermittent ones.   It's a quick in-instill-out job, takes 5 minutes to do but about 2 hours out of my day to attend the appointment each time.

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    • Posted

      Understood. Fine, go for it. There should be absolutely no problems for you. Maybe need a syringe, gloves etc etc, but if you do it first time under supervision of the nurse, she can point out anything you do less than perfect !!
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    • Posted

      I want to be more exact - you need to have 100% sterile technique, something a trained nurse does without really thinking about it. In a nurse office she will have to hand everything she needs, gloves, wipes, disinfectant, scissors, peper towels, lots really.

      But you won't. I recommend you take notes of all she does when she trains you. For example, say you put on sterile gloves, then pick up the medicine bottle and unscrew the top. Woo fail!! Now the gloves are contaminated, and so is everything you touch next.. see, not quite so obvious, ans sometimes the order you do things is important (like prepare the meds before sterilising the hands)

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    • Posted

      Thanks gbhall for the advice.  I have another string to my bow in that my wife is an ex-urology nurse, so can help with any do's / don'ts of it.   She has suggested I should be able to do this myself too.

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  • Posted

    It's very easy to learn imtermittent catherisation. I suggest you start with the nurse you mentioned. The nurse can explain how to do it and also whether self administering the medication is feasable in your particular case. The two biggest factors in successful self catherisation is using the best catheter and using proper technique. 

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    • Posted

      Fyi, Twiglet, the two catheters that show up here by name most often are the SpeediCath and the Magic 3.  I tried both, and use the SpeediCath exclusively.  Reliable and easy to use.  If you go this route, ask us again for tips for ease of use, that the nurse will likely NOT know or show you.  I started cathing when I was rebuilding an old structure to become my minister–wife's church.  I learned how to do it safely even if you can't wash your hands!  That's for regular peeing; your situation may differ however...

       

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  • Posted

    Go to Youtube and search for [ self catherization kevin johnson].  There's a detailed video there showing you what is involved.

    If you are using a catheter with a curved tip, the tip needs to be kept up during the process.

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