How fast is your heart rate?

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Hey- just found this website early this morning when I was having an episode with SVT. I've never been able to trip my heart back with any methods before- I've always had to go to the ER to get a medicine pumped in and then it trips and all is good.

My question is- what are y'all's heart rates when you have an episode? The last time I went to the ER the Dr said mine was too high for them to work but if I took a pill (which I've never had ) then that would maybe slow it down enough for these techniques to work.

Thanks.

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  • Posted

    When I first had SVT my heart rate would be from 150-180.  I am on a low dose beta blocker now.  Still have them but not very often.  Maybe one every few months.  Had one the other night when I was lying in bed.  It only went to 125 (my resting pulse now is around 55-60)  I was able to "break" it within a couple minutes by taking a deep breath and holding it while "bearing down" while counting to 10. I only had to do it twice and my heartrate dropped right back down.

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  • Posted

    Before my ablation my heart rate usually reached around 215 rpm and stayed there for hours;  if I took a Propanalol it came down again after about an hour.  I never went to ER with an attack but was never able to bring it down myself either or identify a trigger.
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  • Posted

    My heart rate was over 210 when I had to go to the ER in 2012. I had difficulty breathing. I tried the val salva maneuver and splashing my face with ice water, but it didn't work. I had to have adenosine given intravenously. My heart rate didn't go back to normal until after 4x of adenosine. Luckily, I've had other svt attacks where my heart rate was 150 avg. I usually do the val salva maneuver and splash my face with ice water and rest. After 1 hour, my heart rate returns to normal. I don't take any meds for svt, but I don't drink coffee or alcohol.

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  • Posted

    Mine is in the 120's. My resting heart rate is in the 50's. Normal heart rate just walking is only in the 60's.

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  • Posted

    Mine was 233. I was certain I was dying.
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  • Posted

    When I went to the ER in July for Adenosine to stop my episode, I was between 140-180. Took 2 doses. Usually a cough stops my small episodes of palpitations, but none of the vagal maneuvers worked that time.
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  • Posted

    Mine used to hit around 189.  I had many trips to the ER, then they tried a cathetar ablation, which did not work.  They put me on a beta blocker, that made be nauseated and finally a calcium blocker.  It works, but I need a full 240mg in the a.m. and 120 half dose in the p.m.

    Now I still get a few cases - not as many as I was.  I just bought a FITBIT watch, that monitors my heart rate all the time.  When I get a case of SVT, it's usually around 125 and occassionally 150.  Then it often drops to the 50's.

    I can have no caffiene.  Some decaf's set it off (especially Starbuck's).

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  • Posted

    My last attack mine was 220-230 using my cardio app on my phone. Holding my wrists under cold water worked for me that time. I take verapamil but still get episodes .
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  • Posted

    I had two different SVTs, atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter. The atrial flutter was around 180 - 220 bpm and I always had to go to the hospital because it lasted for hours, I got sick, and nothing else would bring it down, most of the  time even the hospital meds didn't work. My atrial fibrillation which I only experienced once went up to 350 bpm and I was so ill that I had to be moved in an intensive care ambulance to a children's cardiac hospital about two hours away, and the medicine in the hospital was given to me 5 times and didn't work! I always recommend going to the ER if you have SVT and it doesn't stop after an hour as it can cause low blood pressure and it's always safer to be in hospital. However, maybe you could try a daily dose of beta blockers, as these help to prevent SVT from happening. 

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