Hypermobility and shoulder subluxions

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Hi, I was just wondering, has anybody subluxed their shoulder blade? If so, what did it feel like? I've got joint hypermobility syndrome and chronic fatigue syndrome, and since Wednesday I've had a sharp, very uncomfortable pain in my left shoulder blade, much worse than the typical knots I constantly have. I've not done anything different and lifted anything heavy etc. It seems to get worse then better again, but doesn't go completely. It's currently agony and it's a struggle to use my arm and turn round. Could this be a shoulder subluxion? Thanks in advance.

Caz

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  • Posted

    Hi. My shoulder used to click in and out but showed in front at the throat end of the clavical. Pain in shoulder blade at same time. I would suggest you see a Dr just to clarify. I used to wear a sling when mine was bad to take the weight off my shoulder. Took arm out of sling when I had to use it for essential things then back in sling.

    Hope this helps.

    Denise.

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    • Posted

      Hi, thanks for your reply. I can't see anywhere it's clicked out, to look at it it seems slightly swollen around my shoulder blade and feels quite warm and inflamed on my chest directly opposite my shoulder blade and on my back, nothing sticking out wrongly as such. Just agony. Tried Naproxen, voltarol, Ibuprofen, nothing works, just takes a slight edge off. Hope it goes soon, thanks again for your advice.

      Caz

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  • Posted

    Hey Caz. I also have hypermobility syndrome and i sublux my right shoulder every time I reach forward. It feels like a pop but doesn't normally hurt but I sometimes get a sharp pinch. I'm ll to familiar with the pain you're describing and unfoutunatly this happens to me all the time. Mostly the day after any activity involving my muscles. It sucks. I think that you've probably strained it somehow. If you rest it for a couple of days then start slowly building up your muscles in your shoulder to help hold it in place better it may help. I've been doing this for weeks and it does really hurt after exercise but the severe sharp pain is getting better everyday. No pain no gain. Good luck hope this helps

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    • Posted

      Hi, thanks for your reply. I can't see anywhere it's clicked out, to look at it it seems slightly swollen around my shoulder blade and feels quite warm and inflamed on my chest directly opposite my shoulder blade and on my back, nothing sticking out wrongly as such. Just agony. Tried Naproxen, voltarol, Ibuprofen, nothing works, just takes a slight edge off. Hope it goes soon, thanks again for your advice.

      Caz

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    • Posted

      You probably won't see anything, it happens quickly and goes back on its own. For me, when my arm is reaching out my shoulder is unstable and pops out a wee bit. Then goes back in when I put my arm back down but I end up pulling muscles sometimes. Esp when doing repetitive work like my job sad took me forever to figure out what was going on. You've already won half the battle just knowing you have hypermobility syndrome. Ice and rest for at least a couple days and I just found a good physio who has taught me so much. That's the way to go. If that's not an option try low impact exercise. Avoid stretching too much and Biofreeze gel is amazing. Also a tens unit is worth the money. I'm happy to help any way I can. Sorry you're going through this

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  • Posted

    Hello Caroline,

    I have Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Classic Type with Hypermobility and Vascular features, as well as CFS/ME and Fibromyalgia. I studied neuroscience within clinical psychology and also CFS/ME and human biology for a decade before I developed another rare disorder that has become palliative, but luckily diagnosed myself and my twin sister (and the palliative disorder, and would not be palliatively ill if I had received the appropriate care following my diagnoses but live in a small city in rural Canada).

    I have a lot of experience with various types of treatment, and bilateral shoulder dislocations were my second major dislocation incident (first was bilateral jaw/TMJ dislocation). I would advise you to go to your Emergency department of your hospital to receive an assessment, likely pain medication if you don't already have a prescription (at least stronger anti-inflammatory medication if tolerable, if not opioid medication), and most importantly a referral for physiotherapy.

    1. Physiotherapy:

    I would advise that you inform your physiotherapist/exercise-therapist about your conditions and perhaps provide any brochure or information for physiotherapists relevant to your conditions [search for physiotherapy/physiotherapist + Joint Hypermobility Syndrome (or EDS/your diagnosis for other readers). I received a few months of physiotherapy 3-4/weekly with passive stretching and evolving homework instructions with low-resistance bands by my physiotherapist, followed by TENS and ultrasound on affected muscles (tendinitis of biceps is common) and gentle exercises by an exercise therapist. Be very careful with your physical activity and accept help when needed.

    I benefited greatly until I was bullied by senior-clients into lifting weights that were too heavy for me and injured my jaw/neck by pulling on connected muscles/connective-tissue. So I highly recommend physiotherapy, but make sure that you listen to your body and don't be bullied into overworking your body by fellow clients, and that your physiotherapist is aware of and somewhat educated about your conditions.

    2. Shoulder Brace:

    Try one out, especially  if subluxations/dislocations are a frequent problem. Hopefully your medicare plan (governmental or private) will cover at least part of the cost, and in Canada you can receive a doctor's note to avoid the taxes. 

    3. Sleeping:

    The major and permanent adjustment to sleeping on my back was difficult for me but necessary for bilateral dislocations, but a memory foam mattress cover and pillow really helped. I find that special "antidecubis" or alternating air-tube mattresses and well-padded lift-chairs (if you need help lifting yourself out of a bed) are also more comfortable for sleeping on one's back, if you have access to one or can find an affordable rental service. If you have only one dislocated/subluxated shoulder, I would advise using a large/body pillow behind you to keep you on your better shoulder (instead of rolling over in your sleep onto your bad shoulder and exacerbating your injury). I think that there may be some fancy pillows or pregnancy pillows that are designed to prevent you from rolling over or may keep you comfortable. 

    4. Also, I would advise against chiropractic care based on my experience.

     I hope that this is useful!

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