Hypothyroid Symptoms, Blood Tests Normal

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I'm 23, female. 

My latest blood tests

Free T4: 12.3 ---- 7.2-16.4 pmol/L 

Free T3: 6.0 ---- 3.8-6.0 pmol/L 

Reverse T3: 0.23 ---- 0.09-0.35 ng/mL 

S-TSH: 0.85 ---- 0.37-3.50 mIU/L 

Thyroglobulin: 15 ---- 0-35 ug/L 

Thyroglobulin antibodies: 0.4 ---- 0-4.0 IU/mL 

Thyroid peroxidase antibodies: 5.8 ---- 0-9.0 Iu/mL 

I've had a headache everyday for 20 months with migraine-like symptoms. Some days (most days) I have debilitating pain and nausea, other days I just have a bit of pressure. Recently I read that New Daily Persistent Headache was a symptom of hypothyroidism. My body is incredibly sensitive to everything, with symptoms including eczema, sinuses, stomach cramps, and an even worse headache if I drink or eat the wrong thing. I also have constipation, terrible hair loss, weak and brittle hair and nails, constant fatigue, weight gain (even though I could not be eating any healthier and I struggle to eat), no appetite, abnormal menstrual cycles (I used to be regular to the day), joint pain, a scalloped tongue, a puffy face, my hands and feet are icily cold, and my temperature is 36.8 at most, though normally between 36.3-36.6. 

I have had all the tests done: CT, MRI, EEG, lumbar puncture, and my liver and kidneys are fine. I have also supplemented iron, vitamin B12, and vitamin D (in winter). I've tried acupuncture, reflexology, homeopathy, therapy, and osteopathy when the Western medicine failed. 

I've read of many cases where people have thyroid problems, even though it doesn't show in their blood tests. I know my Thyroid peroxidase antibodies are in the normal range, but isn't it possible that I'm the special case where this amount is making a considerable difference to my health?

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15 Replies

  • Posted

    Hello M53827:

    My name is Shelly and I am a nurse in the USA.  I have Hashimoto's thyroid disease.

    It is so frustrating when you have the symptoms but the blood does not show.  Hashimoto's is very much like that.  If it is in the begining stages it can appear okay and slowly go bad over time. That's how it was with me when I was 27.  I am now 54.

    There is another condition worth looking into called Cushing's Syndrome and they can do a cortisol test for that. Some symptoms sound like it with joint pain and puffy face and weight gain and menstrual problems, and hair problems.  I know it can also be thyroid as they share some symptoms.

    Lastly get tested for Lupus.  They can test for it via blood and see if you have any markers for it. It causes severe fatigue, joint pain and skin and stomach problems, and feeling like not eating.

    Please ask your doctor if you could do a low dose of  (Synthroid) Levothyroxine 25mcg to try and see if it helps your symptoms. Some doctors will give you a low dose even though the blood work is passable.

    Keep us posted on how you do,

    Shelly

     

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    • Posted

      Thank you so much, Shelly. I'll try a low dose of L-thyroxine  and get these tests done and let you know.
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    • Posted

      Hi Cindy

      I think I might've had an overactive thyroid 5 years ago. I was quite thin, had insomnia, and my heart was always racing. But I have no symptoms of an overactive thyroid now. My TSH is up since last year (0.36 to 0.85 mIU/L) and my T4 is down (21 to 12.3 pmol/L). Could this be the beginning of hypothyroidism?

      Another thing which is so strange is that every lab's "nomral" range is different. According to the hospital at which I was last year in Germany, my T4 would be borderline low with their range of 12-23 pmol/L. (Labs base their ranges on the patients who come to them for bloodtests, not on research done on healthy patients).

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    • Posted

      Hello Cindy:

      Overactive Hyper is normally seen when TSH is lower than 0.45 so if it was 0.18 it would be Hyper.

      Hashimoto's is a sneaky thyroid disease because it goes back and forth and if the blood work looks okay, doctors do not always see it. It happened to me also.

      She matches a ton of symptoms with the thyroid and a few other conditions. I suggest she  tested for themto rule out any of them.

      She should also be tested in a 3-6 months for another TSH level and see how it is going. Some doc's will even give you a low dose of Levothyroxine just to see how you  do.

      XO Shelly

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    • Posted

      I feel stunned at this. Are you saying that a low TSH means the thyroid is overactive?

      Can this be due to Hashi's? Are the antibodies present in healthy people . I cannot seem to get a definitive answer anywhere.

      I have seen on this forum that nodules can cause Hashis and also that nodules are formed in an auto immune disease, also that gluten can attack the thyroid. It is difficult to piece all of this together. I want to show my MD that I have reasons for my multiple signs and symptoms. I have some nodules but if it is the case thatt hese formed as a resul of an auto immune disease then wheere does anyone begin to sort out what aused what and when and what blood tests need doing etc, etc.

      Everything seems hopeless meanwhile I suffer these nasty signs and symptoms. It all seems rather unfair and unnecessary.

       

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    • Posted

      Hi Cindy:

      the scale is 0.45 to 4.50 if you are on the low end it means you are Hyper or too much and if you are 5.0 you would be Hypo.

      They are opposite, I know it is confusing!  LOL.

      Nodules come from a few factors:

      #1 some people make cysts or have cystic ovaries etc...

      #2 CHANGES in the tissue, getting older, menopause

      #3- cancer or bad cells clump together

      #4 autoimmune can cause it

      So many things can happen. We can get them and most are Bengin or not cancerous.

      It can cause the thyroid to not work well if it makes one there. If you get cysts on your ovaries you may have trouble having a period.

      Our bodies grow things over time. It is not hopeless and if you want to make sure ask for an ultrasound.

      Shelly

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    • Posted

      Hello Shelly

      I was just wondering if you knew of any published material about the nodules .I was trying to find out who qualified for treatment be it medication, surgery or radio active iodine.

      I noticed that you have three nodules so assume that you had a scan.

      What kind of scan did you have and when was it done?

      If you have already stated when etc then I apologise for asking.

      I am still trying to research these nodules!

      Trying o find out vi any published medical journals at what point treatment s given, when surgery or and radi active iodine iis given 

      I did not realise what a complex subject the thyroid gland is or can be when it goes wrong.

       Cindy

       

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    • Posted

      Hi Cindy:

      I was seen by an Endocrine surgeon about 3 years ago. He ordered an Ultrasound on my thyroid.  I saw him for a cyst that was caught accidently by CAT scan for a kidney stome.  It turned out to be okay and this doctor wanted an ultrasound of my thyroid.

      You may never know you have a nodule esp. if small. I did not want surgery, so I am keeping an eye on them.  However an Endocrinologist can order it also and in some places a GP can order it.

      They can see a lot on imaging and can measure the size and shape and tell if it is warranted to do a bopsy. Mine wer like oval shaped ones.

      Google thyroid nodules as we are not allowed to mention websites on this forum. The thyroid is a complex gland and does many things in our bodies. Lot's is on the net now-a-days and even studies on the gland.

      RAI  is a treatment designed to destroy all thyroid tissue. It was designed to kill cancer of the thyroid.  It is a radioactive iodine that destroys the gland and you become Hypo.  You need replacement hormones for life.

      It can be overwhelming as most people have no idea what a thyroid is. It regulates your period, your core temp, your metablolism, your weight, your heart and your energy level, and it works along with the Pituitary gland and the pancreas, and liver.

      You only get 1 thyroid gland and I ma hoping they can grow one in a lab and one day give you a new one! LOL, it is going  that way.

      Shelly

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    • Posted

      Ha i liked your comment about getting a new thyroid and it going that way!

      I wondered why you were sent to an endocrine surgeon for a cyst on your kidney or have I got that wrong?

      I am still searching the internet to find out boutt he citeria for surgery on the nodules!

      I was told that RAI shrinks any nodules.

      Thanks for your help.

      Cindy.

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    • Posted

      Hi Cindy:

      It was on my adrenal gland and it sits on top of the kidney.  They thought it might be bothering my adrenal gland and an endocrine surgeon does that. At first they thought I had a kidney stome and did a CAT scan and then they saw the cyst. 

      RAI was designed to kill off cancer and it will kill off the gland and it is permanent and does it's job. It is not for shrinking nodules alone but it will get rid of them!   If a person does that, they have to take medication to replace the thyroxine that is gone. It is hard since the body does not have a thyroid anymore and you need to process the medication more through your liver and intestines. From time to time we hear from people having a hard time with this on the forum here.

      Surgery can remove a lobe of the gland but it is risky since the other part may not work as well and your nodules if spread out won't get all of them. If the nodules is pressing on your throat then that is bad.

      You can find websites on the thyroid on the net. They will delete our message if we mention any on here.

      Shelly

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    • Posted

      Thanks Shelly Is it possible to send me the info by PM. Sorry for all these requsts and questions. Cindy.
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    • Posted

      Hello CIndy:

      Your thyroid gland absorbs nearly all of the iodine in your body. When radioactive iodine (RAI), also known as I-131, is taken into the body in liquid or capsule form, it concentrates in thyroid cells. The radiation can destroy the thyroid gland and any other thyroid cells (including cancer cells) that take up iodine, with little effect on the rest of your body.

      I copied this from American Cancer website. It was under cancer of the thyroid. It is a serious treatment and sadly it is permanent. you are also radioactive for about a week or so and must follow certain rules and restrictions afterwards.

      Shelly

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    • Posted

      THanks.

      I was advised about the radio active side of things and alsoo given a leaflet about the precautions taken following radio active iodine etc.

      Now I am researching the criteria for the decision to have RAI as it sounds such a drastic measure.As you have pointed out the RAI destroys the thyroid gland so I must research this in detail before giving the drs a decision

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    • Posted

      Cindy

      no problem, just sent some info and questions are good as you may help another person who reads this also.

      Just ask if I know I will answer.

      XO Shelly

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