I hate type 1 diabetes. How can I get motivated to want to control my health

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I hate type 1 diabetes. Absolutely hate it! I am 17 and have had it for 6 years. It basically ruins my life. No one understand my struggle (apart from my family, sort of). People think diabetes is a joke and not serious. I can't be what I have wanted to work as since a child because of my diabetes and I cry my self to sleep every night because I'm so scared of dying young because of my diabetes. In terrified. Dispite  all of this worry and concern I cannot motivate my self to do regular bgls, I'm always running high and I hate the though of what it's doing to my health. But I can't motivate my self to change it sad 

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  • Posted

    Cheer up Jess, my parents also have Type 1 diabetes. They manage a diet control plan as advised by their Diet nurse, They r in their 80s and keep well.

    I also try to avoid too much sweet food and try to follow a healthy diet 2.

    God bless kind wishes Sue confused

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  • Posted

    you control diabetes it does NOT control you, I have had type 1 for over 14'years

    Be strong like I have and learn to live with it as its for life

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  • Posted

    Yes mate, can sure relate to that...longing for the day when I can go out, order what I want and have a great big slab of dairy caramel all to myself. I know we're stuck with it and it's never what we want to hear. 

    Taking control is all down to you I'm afraid...keep on eating healthily etc etc. 

    how's your social life....do you have a good circle of friends? Sometimes talking about it can help & others can support with good words if they are understanding. Maybe ask to see a psychologist...they can be helpful towards trying to break the psycological chain that you feel is tying you down.

    Have a Google for diabetes support groups. It's not the best news when the doc says "forever", so just try reaching out to others in the same boat (hence starting here I guess!). It is frustrating, but chin up & try talking. Good luck buddy, there's loads of us here

     

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  • Posted

    I completly understand, I'm 22 but I have only had it for 2 years so I am still trying to work out how it fits in with the life I have been living up until now. I try not to think about the long term issues (although this doesn't always work) and try and get on with it but it is a struggle. I stopped doing insulin for a bit just to make life easier but it started to impact my health and I realised that it really wasn't the best way to deal with the situation. It does suck having diabetes and a lot of people don't understand/ can't relate to it, but I've come to think that it is what it is, there is nothing I can do to change it and I am not going to let it ruin my life. I do have days when I just can't be bothered with it and it just gets to me but I suppose there will always be ups and downs. Try to stay positive, and don't worry about what may or may not happen 60 years down the line smile    
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  • Posted

    I have Diabetes type 1 from the age of 7. I am 21 now. The thing is..you have to care for your own health. If you have dreams why not build something? It's ok to feel like you do. It teaches you something. It is not so hard if you just accept it. It will be there even if we like it or not, but you better learn how to manage it than seeing it as a bad thing. Diabetes doesn't stop anybody doing what they like. You are going to be fine with it. The teenage years are tough, i have been there. Accept it and it will be better for you. Talk to somebody about how you feel, maybe your parents.
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  • Posted

    I was so happy to read this! I mean... not happy because you should be taking care of your self. I'm 17 too! Although i've had type one diabetes for nearly 11 years now.

    I know exactly how you feel! No one can understand being 'different'.  But you did a good thing coming to this forum. After my last doctor's visit my A1C was extremely high because I have been experiencing a burn out for quite some time.

    You say that you can't be what you want to be/ have the job you want. How come?

    I understand your struggles so so well and I'm here to tell you that it will get better. But you need to take the first step. I know it's overwhelming to try to just jump back into the routine again. So start with small steps.  Don't try to punish yourself for forgetting to test. Celebrate when you do. Try to test your blood sugar every morning before eating first. And once you get into the habit of that, add before lunch.  Take small steps. That's what I'm currentlly doing and seems to be working. Now, try to do the other testings too but mainly focus on one small thing.

    And of course you don't need me to tell you that having an A1C that's high could lead to having other complications down the road because you've probably had all of the discussions.

    Cheer up and celebrate life! You are alive! You are not alone!

    I get it. A lot of people don't do their research on diabetes and they don't understand. I hate when I have to tell people that I'm diabetic.  They always just give me a blank stare. Maybe because they don't understand or they are thinking: she's not fat.  I find myself correcting people and teaching them about diabetes. Type one and Type two.  I suggest getting out there and becoming a master of your diabetes. Then when people do have questions, you can answer.

    I know that this reply has gotten long but you don't know how excited I have found another 17 year old that seems to feel that same way as I do!  It would be great if you would reply to this because, you know, we can understand each other.

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    • Posted

      11 years, how have you put up with it for 11 years?! 

      My A1C is usually high, the lowest i have ever gotten it too was 8, usually I have an alright A1C one time, and then a high one the next time, i can never seem to be stable and it’s tiring! 

      I live in Australia and in Australia type 1 diabetics have a restricted driver’s license, so we can’t do any of the ‘blue light’ emergency jobs. Ever since a child I have always wanted to be a paramedic, but because of my diabetes I can’t be. It really really sucks!

      I hope so it is a struggle and I just wish there was a cure already, and I think that’s what I get caught up on, is the fact that I haven’t yet learnt to ‘love’ my diabetes.

      I will defiantly try that! Thanks heaps!

      Do you have an insulin pump or do you still have injections?

      Thanks for replying to my rant! Haha, it is always nice to find someone that is in the same sort of situation or feels the same way as I do. I forget there are other people out there that have the same sort of struggle as me. 

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  • Posted

    I live in the US so there are no restrictions. I'm just baffled by that because people tell you to not let diabetes control your life but then you can't have a job you want. That's rediculous! And really, you read through my rant; so thanks. I still do injections but I am eligable for a pump. I just don't like that fact that something stays in my body for a longer period of time. But one thing I know for certain, there will be an artificial pancreas in OUR life time. And I for sure don't love my diabetes! I have just learned how to live with it. I'm glad I could atleast try to help
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  • Posted

    I can appreciate where you are coming from but I have been a type 1 diabetic for more than 43 years. In early January this year my husband came home from work to find me in a diabetic coma & having seizures. I was in ICU at GWH in Swindon for about a week then on a ward for another 3 & half weeks. The whole incident has left me with a brain injury, since my discharge I have a variety of appointments with the brain injury team at GRH in Gloucester as well as appointments with the Diabetic team at Swindon. So far I have had appointments with Psychologists, Occupational therapists, speech therapists, dieticians, consultants. I tend to spend much of the week at either of the 2 hospitals. I know more than most that diabetes is not always easy to live with. But please respect it. Good luck
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  • Posted

    15 years ago when my 25 year old on was diagnosed with diabetes Type 1, the nurse introduced me to the charity and magazine,Diabetes UK. This mag lumps all diabetes tog. and is a mpst depressing read.  After a   few years I discovered JDRF whiich stand for Junior Diabetes Research Foundation.  this is a charity that specifically raises money for research to find a CURE.  They finance renowned  laboratories all over the world, many in this country. A cure really is round the corner.  A 17 year old has every reason to be optimistic.  Get in touch withthem and see how they can raise your mood.  By the way, if you go for a mile jog run every morning( or any exercise that takes your fancy, you will cheer up and your av. blood sugar levels will improve. Dont go from nothing to a 16 mile bike ride like my son!

    Best wishes

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  • Posted

    Hi Jess, I totally sympathise and understand your frustration with the situation but it seems to me that you would be better saving your energy for fighting a battle you can win rather than trying to fight your diabetes which at present you are stuck with.  I feel you need a goal in mind to encourage you to treat your body respectfully so that you can fulfil that goal.  What is it that you really want to be/have in your life etc?  Perhaps it's time to sit and have a serious think.  Good luck with finding your way.
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  • Posted

    I have had type 1 since I was 6 (now w4). It blows hard dude... But you don't have a choice really. I feel the same way as you do. Maybe we can motivate each other?
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    • Posted

      Sorry, I am now 24. And really, talk to me babe because at schoolies I ended up in ICU. It is not as easy as instagram makes it out to be
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  • Posted

    Perhaps in trying to motivate yourself to find a way forward you need to take a moment to look deep within to find out what is stopping you.  Are you feeling so resentful of the diabetes that your inner attitude is 'why should I bother'. 'Why do I have to mind what I eat when others don't?'  'Why me?'  It is often our subconscious beliefs or inherited beliefs that we don't always realise is going on like a whispered conversation in our ears stopping us from achieving our goals.
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