i have a first appointment at warfarin clinic this week what will they do

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was diagnosed with AF several weeks ago and have my first appointment this week at warfarin clinic - what happens there

 

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  • Posted

    Hi buckrogers1

    I was going to the warfarin clinic when I had a dvt recently, it's nothing to worry about. They prick your finger, ask what medication your taking(if any) and take your yellow book and your blood reading to the blood scientist there who calulculates how much warfarin you should take and it could be the same each day or different amount on different days, it's all noted in your yellow book, they then book you a next appointment. I do know if you take any new medication your supposed to let them know as warfarin reacts, so you may need lower dose or higher. Good luck

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  • Posted

    Hi there, my first appointment covered; blood test to determine clotting level to determine how much warfari needed, discussion about the range you need eg mine is 2- 3 with a target of 2.5, discussion about all medications you take including any supplements, a chat about your diet, usual things like weight, blood pressure etc. They will give you your yellow book which records your INR after each blood test and a note of how much warfarin you should take as well as your next blood test date, a credit card size card to carry in your wallet with relevant details and a booklet explaining everything. I guess different clinics will have similar process but this is what happened for me. Biggest thing for me was sitting in waiting room for 3 hours. This is why I moved as quickly as possible to self testing. Currently have test at clinic every 3 months (just go and have blood test, leave them my yellow  book and disappear, they then call me with result) self test in between and ring in results.
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  • Posted

    Hi buckrogers1 My experience was almost exactly the same as Patricia 123, except I didn't have to wait for 3 hours! I went back to the clinic one more time (a week later), then once I was stabilised on a Warfarin dose I was given the option of going to my local doctor's surgery for my regular INR testing, which has now settled down at once every 3 months. The sample is sent to the hospital clinic, and I receive the results through the post, usually the next day or sometimes the day after, giving my INR level and the dosage of Warfarin I should take until the next test. I am lucky in that I stabilised very quickly and my dose has remained the same since I started being tested at the doctor's surgery.
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  • Posted

    It is clear that different hospitals organise things differently.  My experience was similar to the replies so far offered; but my wait has not been long, the blood test is a simple prick in my smallest finger, I won't get the option of a self-test or a GP visit and, for the first few weeks, I have to turn up each week either (initially) at the hospital or (later) at a local clinic.  Eventually, I hope that the interference in my time will settle down; but I shall have t see.  The overall message is - don't be nervous and take something to read.
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  • Posted

    I spoke with consultant about self testing and he was very encouraging. I did have to buy machine myself but my GP perscribes the test strips. Its been a bit hit and miss across the country with some GP's happy to do this but others have refused. NICE the regulating body have just approved self testing so things will begin to change. In many countries like Germany self testing is the norm. Hopefully we will caught up soon.
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    • Posted

      They should provide the test strips as you are saving them time by doing it yourself and they probbly still get the same £10 testing fee. Do you have to phone your results at an appointed time.
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  • Posted

    I think that is exactly the reason NICE have recommended that more people are moved to self testing, its cheaper all round and much more convenient for most people so a win, win situation for everyone. I do not phone in my results just make a note in yellow book (if result was out of my range I would call, they have an answer service and all messages before 4 pm are responded to same day).
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    • Posted

      That is a good system. When I was taking warfarin patients had an appointed time to call in. Often when I was having mine checked the nurse would be annoyed at people  phoning in late at a time reserved for patients.
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    • Posted

      There was an interesting programme on radio 4 (In health programme) this afternoon regarding the new alternative drugs that can be used instead of warfarin particularly for people with AF.  They are being phased in but the programme refers to the new guidelines from NICE encouraging there use. The NICE guidelines make interesting reading and may prove to be a valuable source for people having discussions with their consultant. The new drugs require no monitoring and are definitely the way forward. 
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    • Posted

      I must listen to the programmed on iPlayer.

      They are expensive. Warfarin costs pence + the monitoring.

      According to BNF they have they have to be taken twice a day and would cost over £60 for a months supply.

      They are contraindicated for anyone like myself who has had a heart valve replaced.

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    • Posted

      Originally, I had a stroke, late May, 2014, then by the charity, AF, suggested Ribaroxaban, but not a good success, and did changed it.  In two and a halve months, in September and October, I was diagnosed with AF and DVT, then told to consider rivaroxaban. In view of the offer of Ribaroxaban, I tried for 2 month and half, and the long resolute was horrible pains with increasing bad stomach pain, body aches, felt weakness and could not move or walk easily, and eventually, and what I explained, the medicine was stopped.       

      There are occasions when these medicines appear good examples and appear appropriate for many, however, there are some patients ( in England and in America) who are allergic to medicines. NICE has a conventional mode in favour of many treatments - but the view of patients ( vulnerable) should be registered and heard. 

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