I'm 24 with osteoarthritis in the hip, I need some blunt advice please.

Posted , 4 users are following.

At 22, I was diagnosed with Tenosynovitis in my left wrist, surgery was prescribed but I didn't go for it. I relaxed the wrist for months and use it only when necessary, the swelling is not as bad as it was and I don't feel pain anymore. Now, at 24, it's early osteoarthritis in both hips, though I feel the pain only in the left hip. A GOPD consultant once asked if I had any kids (I'm a female) and I said no, her facial expression made me uneasy as if it would affect child-bearing. I'm scheduled to meet with the the surgeon on Tuesday and I want to go prepared without self-pity or feeling shocked. Please, if you can, tell me what I'm likely to hear and how this can affect other areas of my life.

0 likes, 8 replies

Report / Delete

8 Replies

  • Posted

    I had tenosynovitis at a similar age to you.after two children by the time I was 28 I had it in my shoulders then my knees. We then moved to a flatter area and the arthritis disappeared. I'm accident prone and in my 40 had a fall in an awkward position that damaged my neck and shoulder. Then over the next years I had more aches and pains. Since 2007 OA in back surgery. One foot toe operated on end of last year. Also now hands. So it needn't be as bad as you think. I've had years where there has been no problems. It's all arising now but I'm in my 70s. 

    Keep as active as possible. Eat healthy and smile a lot. I wish you luck. That's the most important thing

    Report / Delete Reply
  • Posted

    I too had tenosynovitis diagnosed in both thumb joints early on in life, probably late 20's/early 30's.  It was repetitive strain that caused it from my job/social activities.  For a while it was very severe and I was so worried I'd have to give up work.  Back then there was no internet to research for help but many friends and acquaintances gave me tips and good advice.  After a lot of trial and error I found things that helped, including a thumb splint and various supplements.  I was told by my doctor at the time it was 'self determining' ie it would come and go depending on how much strain I was putting on the joints.  He was right.  I had only minor discomfort for the next 20 years.  Now in my 60's I have OA in various other places, including one ankle due to a major accident, but my thumbs only flare up if I over use them or try to do movements that aggravate it.  I got diagnosed with early arthritis in upper spine and neck but by being careful what I do, including making sure I have the right pillow and not sitting at a screen or in one position for too long, I've kept it at bay for many years and it's still only mildly painful and not debilitating.  OA is more common than generally acknowledged, it's a 'wear and tear' condition that comes to most of us if not all.  When its diagnosed in younger life, like with us, it's usually that our work or social activities have caused RSI type conditions.  Mostly it can be managed.   Luckily for me any surgeon I've seen has concurred with me that surgery is not the first port of all, clinically managing it has proved effective.  I don't even have to take pain meds most of the time, just anti inflamms when I know that due to over exertion or use of a particular joint is going to cause pain later.   These forums are wonderful for great ideas on how to prevent it getting worse, managing the condition and relieving pain. 

    Report / Delete Reply
  • Posted

    Seen the specialist, next appointment is in three weeks. It's not that bad, I'll make necessary lifestyle changes such as avoiding sitting on a spot for too long - traffic, I think I should take up swimming classes, I would avoid standing.

    Report / Delete Reply
  • Posted

    Ian scheduled for a total hip replacement. There are things you can do to slow down the progression. Yoga, stretching, Osteo Bi-flex is a joint supplement that is great for rebuilding cartilage and protecting your healthy joints.

    Hip pain is felt in the hip, groin, butt, thigh, knee.....

    I couldn't walk without a cane. I started wearing Leggs active support, control top pantyhose and my pain went from a 9 to a 3. I need the cane only when I'm not wearing the hose. Mobility also increased.

    This may not answer your question, but I hope it will help you.

    Report / Delete Reply
  • Posted

    This week, it was discovered to be beyond osteoarthritis, it was a connective tissue disease affecting my joints gradually causing them to expand beyond normal. I have forgotten what exactly it was called but it's femoral. Relaxation and rest have been prescribed. Pregnancy will be closely monitored and all childbirths are certainly going to be through a Caesarean Section.

    Report / Delete Reply

Join this discussion or start a new one?

New discussion Reply

Report or request deletion

Thanks for your help!

We want the forums to be a useful resource for our users but it is important to remember that the forums are not moderated or reviewed by doctors and so you should not rely on opinions or advice given by other users in respect of any healthcare matters. Always speak to your doctor before acting and in cases of emergency seek appropriate medical assistance immediately. Use of the forums is subject to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy and steps will be taken to remove posts identified as being in breach of those terms.

newnav-down newnav-up