I'm having an ultra sound on my heart

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I'm a bit concerned has I'm having an ultra sound on my heart tmorro has a follow up to my 24 hour monitor my father had a triple bypass in his 70s his brother died of an heart attack my nan had angina and subsequently died of an heart attack am I worrying unduly

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  • Posted

    Well, what would be more worrying, is if they were not doing any tests.

    Generally, if they can detect things in time, they can set them right, it is only when they go undetected, that you end up with problems.

    Two things are going to happen, one you (hopefully) will be given the all clear or they know what they need to do. I know this is easy for me to say (but I have myself been in the odd one or two life in the balance moments in the past 18 months) but worrrying will not help it, it will stress you out and lower your immune system. Try not to think about it until tomorrow.

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  • Posted

    Better to know and be stress free than not to know and worry. (Easily said than done).

    Try and remain stress free and Good Luck, 2 of my relations had an SAH/Bleed of the Brain but they said I wasn't a close  enough relative ??  Go figure ..Just be Well and calm and let us know how you get on xx

    Love

    Win xx

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  • Posted

    Hi Joanne

    Hopefully, it could be that they are just being thorough this time given your family history, and not that there is anything wrong. That being said, they should also look at other risk factors such as current diagnoses (health conditions you've already got e.g: diabetes, cholesterol, heart problems/disease etc) and lifestyle behaviours: the usual smoking, alcohol consumption, diet, exercise, etc.

    The positive way (difficult I know) to look at it is if they find something wrong they can treat it/manage it or refer you for further investigation. If there's nothing wrong they should advise you and give you guidance on how to make necessary lifestyle changes to reduce your risk (if any lifestyle risk factors apply to you).

    Hope everything goes okay, all the best RR

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  • Posted

    While it's good that they're doing tests, given your family history, here's what my dad's was:

    He had treatment for high blood pressure, in his 60's had some more serious problems. Both his parents died aged 62, of heart attacks. All his siblings had heart problems, the youngest dying in his 50's. My Dad had all the tests available to him.... And eventually died, aged 82, as a result of cancer.

    I realise that having tests is always a concern, but, although they might show problems, it means that something could be done to help.

    I wish you all good luck with your tests... And as my Dad always said 'just keep taking the tablets...' It worked well for him!

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    • Posted

      They wouldn't comment on my prognosis, I had a fairly serious ICH about 18 months ago and I've also enjoyed the alcohol a bit too much over the years.
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    • Posted

      What I mean is did you have a stroke I've been having blurred vision droopy mouth slurred speech and the worst pain in my head ever
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    • Posted

      Yes, there are two main types of stroke, TIA (minor one usually, a blood clot) which account for 90% of strokes and then there is the bleed on the brain (artery bursting). The latter quite often caused by hypertension. They are split into two, ICH and SAH, depending on where the bleed is located. Both the latter have about a 50% mortality rate.
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    • Posted

      Yes, I had a stroke. I had different symptoms to most people and I was lucky enough to go see my GP, who realised straight away, I went straight to hospital from the GP surgery.

      I have no wish to worry you and it is not in my nature to be over dramatic, but knowing what I have learnt over the last 18 months, yours sound slike classic stroke symptoms and I would wandering down to A&E for a check.

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    • Posted

      Did you have mini strokes before your major stroke and amy specific warning signs has I have an irregular heart bear and tachycardia high BP and pulse too
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    • Posted

      I had different symptoms to most people. Don't forget, that my type of stroke only accounts for 10%, not the other 90%.

      I felt very ill, in a weird way like I have never felt before. Then my legs started to go on me. When we got to the doctor's surgery, I sat in the car, whilst my wife announced to the receptionist that I was there. When the GP called, she went out to the car and helped me to walk in, I wouldn't have made it on my own.

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    • Posted

      I also had a subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH), in 2012, from an aneurysm I hadn't known that I had. By first symptom, was a 'thunderclap headache', I wasn't aware of any such thing at the time. It just caused instant, excruciating pain, right in the middle of my brain, I panicked, phoned upstairs to my daughter, said that something was REALLY wrong. Apart from remembering a bit about the paramedics and the first hospital I was at, the next thing I remember is that it was 6 1/2 weeks later. Apparently, when the surgeon tried to fix it, up my femoral artery, it caused a bigger bleed. They had to make a large burr hole in my skull, to stabilise me enough to go into my brain and clip the aneurysm, I was incredibily lucky, not simply to have survived, but to have not ended up seriously impaired afterwards, now I'm rambling.

      If anyone is in any way concerned that they could be having any type of stroke, they should seek immediate medical assistance.

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    • Posted

      Yes, I was lucky too. Two months in two different hospitals, a blood plasma transfusion and a long spell as an outpatient in the rehab stroke hospital. Nothing much they can do for an ICH except monitor you and keep you safe. The fact that I had liver failure and went jaundiced whilst I was there (too much alcohol over too long a period) complicated matters somewhat, getting changed from stroke wards to gastroenterology and back again. The stroke consultants had to come in to gastroenterology sometimes and the gastroenterologists had to go to the stroke wards sometimes.

      But apart from a few minor things that are easy to live with, I'm okay. I didn't like the fact that I was in a wheelchair the whole time I was in hospital and they did no physio. I was determined not to leave in a wheelchair, so I pee'd them off big time, by attempting to walk as much as I could. I ended up calling the ward nrse, nurse Ratched (to her face), because she was always telling me to stop or go back to bed. In the end, I walked out, with the aid of a walking stick.

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    • Posted

      It sounds as if you kept the nurses on their toes. Well done for walking out! Like me, you were dealing with more than one medical problem, I have MS, so it's a bit difficult, between MS and the aftermath of my subarach; to tell where one ends and the other begins, because some symptoms are hard to tell apart.
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    • Posted

      I just got fed up of not being told anything. I only found out about the blood plasma tranfusion 8 months after I left hospital and the hepatologist wasn't happy with my blood tests and asked me if I'd ever had a blood transfusion, to which I was about to say no, when he said, of course you have, we gave you one here.

      I only found out about being detoxed in hospital when I got hold of the neuro consultants report at the stroke hospital and it mentioned that I'd been detoxed. I kept asking the hospital when I was going to be discharged (no answer) and what was going to happen with my legs and reduced use of right arm (no answer).

      Finally I collared a senior nurse and said (this was on the Sunday) that I was leaving on the Thursday, that I would prefer to be discharged, but if it came to it, I would self discharge. On the Wednesday, I collared her and said, I haven't seen the consultant that you said would want to see me before I was discharged. Thursday lunchtime, I again said, well, I'm going in two or three hours when my wife gets here to take me home. Is there not some paperwork to be filled in, any medication, any instructions to give my GP and that consultant never truned up, so I never saw him. I said, otherwise, thank everyone for their help and you have a spare bed for the next patient this evening.

      About an hour before I was about to go, a consultant turns up, asks me why I want to leave, tells me am I aware of how delicate my brain was and what would happen if I had a knock to the skull. Also asked me if I would stay if he told me that they had physio on the floor above. To which I said, maybe, if you had told me that about three weeks ago or even had you come to me on the Sunday/Monday and sat down and answered all my questions and put my mind at rest, as it is, my wife is probably parking the car up outside and I'm dressed to go home.

      If they had just treated me as a human being, rather than a body occupying a bed, that needed to be fixed, just talked to me, I would have been a model patient, as it was, I tried to escape six times, including twice from the one step down ward. At least twice they had to call the security guards (for my own safety). If I could have walked, I would have been out of there. In fact in our ward of four, one person did do a runner during visiting hours. It was hilarious to see all these hospital staff running around panicking that they'd lost a patient. They asked us (ward patients) if we knew and we said no, but we knew exactly where he'd gone.

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