inflamed liver sent home

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My son went to a gastrenologist (sp) August 29, his blood test for hep or diabetes, etc were negative, he stated "inflamed liver" and sent him home to follow a special diet and come back once a week, and no work for 30 days. My son did not make it to his one week appt as he steadily went down hill, no energy, nauseous, no appetite, weak, shaky I advised him to go to ER sooner but he did not listen. At his ER visit, the doctor immediately referred him to a bigger/better hospital, he had liver AND kidney failure by this time, and died 9 days later in the hospital. I am angry the doctor did not test him better on August 29, he should of been submitted then, maybe he would still be here for his 3 young children and high school sweetheart. He was only 36 years old and had much more years to live. He drank alcohol, but was not a daily drinker, he drank when he was upset such as losing a loved one, he was allergic to alcohol also. got red faced and hot if he drank. My question is, is it common that a doctor wouldn't treat right away? I mean, the 2nd day after he was sent home he was so weak and shaky he couldn't drive himself or walk around the house without being pained. I am devastated and feel he should of been treated right away sad it was like he was sent home to pass.

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  • Posted

    I gather from your wording and spelling that you are US based. I can really only comment on British based situations, but it will help anyone else replying to know that you are US based

    However, blood tests are only an indicator and not definitive. Lack of energy/appetite tends to indicate liver problems, as the liver generates and stores energy not the stomach. People with liver problems often lose their appetite, because of connected issues (co-morbidity).

    There could be many issues why he had problems, maybe he drank more than he let on, speaking as someone who has been to hospital with liver failure, I know how easy it is to hide drinking. He might have had an undiagnosed illness, the possibilities are endless. If it is the same as Britain, they will do an autopsy before they release the body and that should provide some answers.

    I am sorry for your loss, no parent expects to outlive their children.

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  • Posted

    Thank you for your response. No autopsy but they really should of.
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    • Posted

      In Britain there would have been one, because of the way the NHS works. They can compulsory order an autopsy against the wishes of the NOK, to find out the exact cause of death, in case any legal case is brought. It might be worth enquiring why one was not ordered and as someone else has said, maybe his wife has more info as she was NOK?
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  • Posted

    I’m so sorry for your loss. No mother should have to see their child die before they do. Sadly it does happen.

    Your poor son was obviously very ill. If he’d lived would he have recovered or would he have continued to be very sick? Maybe the doctor felt there was nothing that could be done? I don’t know.

    I do know that his wife and children must also be as devastated as you are. Try to give each other support and love in his memory.

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  • Posted

    So sorry for your loss. My sincere condolences to you.

    Are you in England or Wales or are you further afield in Scotland, N Ireland or somewhere else in the world? If in England or Wales, you can get free support to ask questions about your son's treatment and, if appropriate free advocacy support to make a complaint. I'm quite clued up on this as I undertake voluntary work for one of the agencies involved. I suspect that there may be similar arrangements elsewhere in the U.K., but I'm afraid I don't know of provision elsewhere. 

    Keep strong!

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  • Posted

    What does his death certificate say as cause of death? Does your country have inquests in cases like this?  Have you spoken to his wife about your concerns? She may know more than you do. By the way just out of interest what nationality are you? Your last sentence sounds like someone of African descent. I have many Kenyan and Nigerian friends who use that same phrase when someone dies.
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    • Posted

      I am from the US. I am native american. I was with her and my son in the hospital for the 9 days he was hospitalized. The doctors also told me what was going on as we met together. I did not see the death certificate, so i am not sure what they wrote.

      Thank you 

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  • Posted

    I'm sorry for your loss.

    I, too, had sudden liver failure. Mine came as esophageal varicies caused by cirrhosis of the liver due to hep b. My episode began 4 days before failure with fatigue and loss of appetite, and progressed until I was vomiting copious amounts of blood. However, I got my diagnosis in 2011 and lowered my lipids through diet alone.

    When it comes to glandular organs like the liver, gall bladder, pancreas (etc) things can go either way quicker than you realize. Having said that, if you still have questions then seek advocates to help answer them. The hospital that saved my life also sent me home without the proper meds and I almost died at home from hepatic encephalopathy (ammonia in the brain).

    If you still have questions then keep asking anyone who will listen.

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  • Posted

    thank you, yes, I am still in shock from how quickly my son was gone. I will always have questions, but their may not be answers.

    Thanks again.

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    • Posted

      I don't know how it is the States, but in Britain we can get our hospital records, I got mine and it made for very interesting reading.

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  • Posted

    I'm so sorry for your loss. I could easily be the next and I'm in England nobody is safe from doctors who are arrogant and not cautious...it's so sad. Being told I have an eating disorder when I have 50 symptoms of liver failure.

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    • Posted

      Although interestingly looking at it from a different point of view, I had no symptoms of liver failure but tests following a diagnosisis Of iron deficiency  anaemia showed liver damage. All my liver enzyme tests were normal but a scan showed my liver was badly damaged  and I had to have a very sudden liver resection last Thursday.
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    • Posted

      Exactly there's thousands of testimonies like this but my doctor still thinks I'm in same so I'm having to pay privately.

      The funny thing is I am Healing in starting to feel better doing a vegan low fat diet and I expect in three weeks to be in a much better position I almost hope the Liver doesn't heal completely so I have some evidence to use against the NHS for nearly costing me my life and tens of thousands of pounds!

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