Irregular Heartbeats/A Fib - Caused by Obesity? Anyone Cured It By Losing Weight?

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Hi Guys!

I was diagnosed with paraoxysmal A FIb, my doc said I also had SVTs I thought (I should have wrote it down right after she told me) She was not concerned and I wasn't prescribed anything.

I have had random A Fib over the past 6 months but thankfully have not had a bad episode for awhile. 

However I am feeling like garbage the past week, I had a short A Fib (diagnosed by my Kardia App) and have been having issues with irregular heartbeats for a week or so. I felt like my heart was having pretty strong irregular beats so I asked my husband to listen to my chest and after a few minutes he did catch one.

Having trapped gas and indigestion 100% contributes to my problems as I almost exclusively have issues during these times.

My question is- I am eating super well, drinking tons of water, taking vitamins, etc, no alcohol, smoking or anything. I can't think of a single 'reason' for my issues, besides obesity. I am quite overweight and wondering if this is causing it. I don't even eat anything that should be causing my indigestion/trapped gas so I'm wondering if being large is just putting too much weight on my inner organs and causing these problems?

Has anyone lost weight and cured their A Fib/Irregular heartbeats??

 

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16 Replies

  • Posted

    Being overweight can substantially increase the chance of having bouts  of Afib. It can also increase your chances of stroke. Not sure about your SVTs but they are for the most part benign.

    Jim

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    • Posted

      "Benign" meaning they probably won't kill you, no matter how awful they make you feel.

      ?There is a lot of talk that various arrhythmias are caused by crosstalk between the vagus nerve and the heart.  Does obesity increase this?  Maybe.  Is it a good idea not to be obese if you're having arrhythmias?  I'd say so.

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  • Posted

    Being overweight or having bloating is definitely the cause of an AF episode. It puts pressure on your organs and interferes with your heart. The heart is right next to your oesophagus 
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  • Posted

    Hi Chickenloop, I can't speak for obesity, my BMI says my weight is normal, However I can speak for bloating, wind and belching; I had a lot and it contributed to bouts of palpitations following finding I had atrial flutter. I had an ablation in June 2016, and no further bouts of Afib, but until I sorted my digestion out I still got palpitations quite regularly. 

    Visited a nutritionist last September, found I had an intolerance predominantly to dairy products, so I have gone dairy free, and the difference is immense, very little bloating, very little wind, virtually no palpitations.

    Hope that helps a little.

    Best Wishes

    Sherpa Al

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  • Posted

    Try taking H&B magnesium and potassium one each per day. I’ve been on them for 7 months no issues. Well worth a try. 

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    • Posted

      I have been taking both already but thanks for the advice!! I noticed no improvements unfortunately. I will be buying a new type and brand once these bottle runs out just to see.
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    • Posted

      My doc said potassium has to be at the right level. We discovered that mine  was high without taking supplements and I had to take action to reduce potassium. [u]Excess[/u] potassium can cause arrhythmias I believe. I'm guessing only way to know is a blood test?

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  • Posted

    The hospital docs told me not to beat myself up over being overweight, that this did not cause AF in itself. There however many different triggers to AF from chocolate to stress. As it turns out my AF was the familial kind, my grandfather, father, brother etc nephew alas!

    Its sounds as if your vagus nerve involved in your AF. There has been quite a lot on the discussion form about this so rather than repeat  - search for AF Vagus nerve and you will find it.

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    • Posted

      Yes, look into the vagus nerve issue.

      It is a known fact that an irritated vagus nerve can cause Ectopic heartbeats(PVC and PAC).

      If obesity does not "directly" cause AFIB I think it will "help it on " in the long term.

      You are what you eat, and how you eat. Your heart will only reflect that in the long term.

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  • Posted

    A friend of mine as AF, he is only 35 years old, he does not drink, smoke, he is 5ft 11inch, weight 12  stone, his job is a Vet , he tries to keep himself fit, but it is only exertion that brings on the AF...apparently there are many triggers for AF.

    I also have AF & its exertion that brings on my AF also...coffee, alcohol, food does not affect me....but I personally have noticed that after having a good evening meal I get frequent flutters so I do think digestion can have some sort of an effect on the heart electronics

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  • Posted

    Thanks guys. I am just so very tired of this. I am experiencing heart palps every single day and it is driving me nuts. I am trying to lose weight. I eat extremely limited diet due to IBS (I am managing my IBS very well thankfully). 

    When I can afford it I plan on seeing a nutritionist to see if there is anything further I can do but at this point i am doubtful that what I am eating is causing it. I eat small meals of very simple food (white rice, chicken, peas, carrots, kale, etc) I have cut out the kale before but it did not change anything.

    I will do my best to become a healthy weight to see if it fixes this as I am just miserable. 

    It is for sure related to gas and the vagus nerve. My doctor doesnt believe that is possible!!!! I've brought it up to her a few times and she tells me it is not that, that it is anxiety. Doctors are quite dismissive I find.

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    • Posted

      anxiety & stress are the 2 things that can & will cause AFiB....I really don't think its your diet....also remember that if you or anyone is taking anticoagulants for AF that a lot of various green vegetables are to be carefully considered or avoided due to the high levels of Vitamin K which helps blood clotting the exact opposite to what you take anticoagulants for.

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    • Posted

      Greebo,

      Modern thinners like Xerelto, Pradaxa and Eliquis, do not require dietary changes. Also you can eat as much green vegetables as you want on the older thinners like Coumadin, as long as it's on a consistent basis and your dosage has been properly adjusted.

      As far as triggers, a quick read here suggests different triggers for different people, but being overweight is a known trigger and in any event losing weight for obsese individuals  has universal health benefits.

      Jim

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    • Posted

      Yes Jim I know all there is to know about blood thinners, I wont take any of them & would not recommend them either also as said before same goes for statins...they dish out these cheap pills to try & save the NHS cash...but the side effects can be horrific as I have experienced,

      I now take herbal meds to thin the blood & exercise regularly & feel like a new man, apart from sciatica which is another problem I am dealing with right now....there certainly nowt to get old for is there..cry

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    • Posted

      I wasn't taking a stance one way or another on thinners. Just pointing out that the modern thinners do not require diet modification or blood monitoring, and even the older thinners allow as much greens as you want, as long as everything is monitored. I currently am not taking thinners but would consider it if my CHAD score and/or the dynamics of my afib significantly changed. Glad you're feeling better on your regimen. Regular exercise, a proper weight and good diet, can do more than a lot of these drugs, agreed, but doesn't mean it has to be either/or.

      Jim

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