Is HETEROGENEOUS Thyroid normal?

Posted , 7 users are following.

This discussion has been locked due to a period of inactivity. Start a new discussion

I just received my TSH blood test and its 96 (Norm .5-5.5). 

Got thyroid ultrasound and it said: 

The right lobe of the thyroid measures 5.6 x 2.4 x 1.9 cm and is heterogeneous. 

The thyroid isthmus measures 7 mm. 

The left lobe of the thyroid measures 5.0 x 1.8 x 1.8 cm and is heterogeneous.

PROMINENT HETEROGENEOUS THYROID GLAND WITHOUT FOCAL NODULE.

My doc put me on Levothryoidcine 50 and will do other blood tests in six weeks.  He Said my ultrasound is normal.

is my thyroid enlarged? Isn't 96 very high?  Should I request a endocrinologist?  I have terrible symptoms and after all the non/misdiagnoses am ready to get some relief!

0 likes, 40 replies

Report

40 Replies

Next
  • Posted

    Well, I am no expert in interpreting sonargrams but here are a couple of facts.

    Thyroids should be homogeneous. Homo means "the same", think of a black cat having a homogeneous fur whereas a tortoishell cat has heterogeneous fur. They found an uneven surface of your thyroid, a speckled texture, if you wish.  But there was no nodule seen - that is good, although even if there was a nodule it isn't necessarily a bad thing it could be benign. 

    I do not know the average size of the thyroid gland but you can easily Google that.

    96 is very high for TSH and you will need immediate T4 supplementation. If that doesn't alleviate your sypmtoms you may need T3 as well. They may put you on T3 only to start with so as not to stimulate any cancerous cells which MAY be starting to develope.

    You will probably get a full thyroid panel blood test next to have a look to see if any antibodies are present - i.e. is your body fighting off a thyroid disease? And yes, after your GP has done some of this ground work he may or may not recommend an Endo, it depends what they find.

    Hope this enlightens you some what.

    Report
    • Posted

      Just found this on Google re average size of a thyroid gland:

      Anatomy.

      The normal thyroid weighs approximately 15 to 25 g, with each lobe 4 to 6 cm in length and 1.3 to 1.8 cm in thickness. The isthmus measures less than 4 to 5 mm.

      So, your thyroid is not enlarged, it is about average - that's good!

      Report
    • Posted

      Thanks for info.  You are very clear in your words.

      In six weeks he wants T4, free and T3, free and TSH 3rd generation.  I don't see any antibody tests.  Should I call and request those? I don't want to wait ANOTHER six weeks.  Is T3/T4 same as LEVOTHYROXINE?  So confusing and right now I am very confused, trust me!

      Report
    • Posted

      If antibodies ae causing the thyroid to malfunction would the thyroid be normal in size or likely to swell. Can  low tsh cause severe tetany like spasms of the feet and ankles?

      Would iodine help a low tsh?

      Lucy.

      Report
    • Posted

      Hi Lucy,

      Well, I can answer a couple of those questions. It is not the antibodies which cause the thyroid to malfunction. The thyroid is already malfunctioning and it causes the immune system to send the antibodies to the problematical area. Antibodies are like soldiers, they are dispatched  to fight the elements causing the problem. That is why they do antibody blood tests. If there is a lot of antibodies, then there is a problem somewhere.

      I do not believe a low TSH will cause spasms of the feet and ankles. I have had low TSH (also known as supressed TSH) for 8 years and I have never had any trouble with my feet.

      Do a lot of research on Iodine before you take it, too little and too much can cause big problems. All I can say on that is read about iodine and understand its function before you take foods that will send your levels up. I believe that just using iodonized salt can give you all that you need but I have not recently read up on this subject. I do remember though that there are areas of the world where you get no iodine in your water nor in the vegetables grown in the local soil, Derbyshire is one of those region. In those places the people have to get iodine externally otherwise their thyroids are adversly affected. (Of course, these days veggies consumed are not necessarily grown locally - so some iodine is consumed by default).

      Report
  • Posted

    I know just how you feel, I've trying to get answers for 10 years and have ben to several endo, and primary doesnt know what else to tell me to do.  I would think that a TSH of 96 is way off.  I have been having problems with my legs and the newest endo stopped my medication and my TSH went to 82 he  then put me on 25mg of snythroid and am now on 88.  I cant walk and wish I was dead.  

     

    Report
    • Posted

      Sorry you wish you were dead.  It is very discouraging after all the doctors and you still feel bad.  As you can see I don't know how to help you.  But I do know the legs numb and giving out feeling.  One day do something, next day home.  Please don't despair.  I am ecstatic after all the tests and docs they HOPEFULLY found something to get me back on track.  Hope is a good thing.
      Report
    • Posted

      Marge, see if you can get on an NDT, e.g. Armour thyroid. Pains in the legs associated with thyroid problems is usually low T3. Synthroid is only T4 and the docs rely upon the patient's ability to convert T4 to T3. T3 is the active hormone which will enter your cells and give you energy.

      Any TSH over 10 is hypothoiridic and needs at least 125 mcg of T4 for starters.  Tell your primary you want a full thyroid panel done so that you can see where you stand. That will entail T4, T3, TSH, reverse T3 and antibodies. If he will not do this either get them done privately and read up on how to interpret the results or publish them here and you will get dozens of suggestions.

      It's usually an ignorant or uninterested doctor which is the biggest problem. So it is not safe to rely upon them completely. Please do not give up, we have all been there and struggled out, but it does take time.

      Report
    • Posted

      Good question Lucy. I am very sorry but I am not sure since I have only had hypo and I have no familiarity with hyper. Perhaps someone who has hyper could answer this question from first hand experience.
      Report
    • Posted

      I just read a good internet article and it made me think of you.

      How do you approach the problem of TSH elevation..... On medscape . Com.  

      it has some ideas that might be helpful to you.  Example: I just had a small bowel barium test and the barium went thru my small bowel faster than they could do the X-rays!  Hope that doesn't interfere with my LEVOTHYROXINE absorption.

      perhaps there's something in the article that helps.

      Report
  • Posted

    Hello Ann:

    My name is Shelly and I am a nurse in the USA. I have Hashimoto's thyroid disease.

    Hetergeneous means uniform throughout and is a normal appearance.  No nodules were seen.  The TSH normal is 0.34 to 5.60  so you are in the normal zone.

    It is wise to recheck the blood in 2 to 3 months. Doctors like having several tests in a 6 month period.  They also retest if you are on meds like thyroxine.

    You can ask for a referal to an Endo if you wish.  It may help to see a specialist.

    Let us know how you do.

    Shelly

    Report
    • Posted

      I was under the impression homogenous is smooth and normal.  Heterogenous is bumpy and not normal.

      My TSH is 96.  That definitely is not normal.

      Report
    • Posted

      Hi Shelly,

      With the greatest respect, you are wonderful but please note that Ann's TSH was 96, nowhere in the normal range, and Homo is "the same" while Hetero is "different".

      I hope you do not mind me pointing this out, but it's kind of serious.

      Report
    • Posted

      Hello LAH:

      I misread it.  Sorry! I thought it was 0.96 my bad.  Yes, that would mean she is low or Hypo.

      Heterogenous in my medical dictionary means uniform in structure. 

      I also know this word as it is used a lot in the medical world. You can google it.

      Shelly

      Report
    • Posted

      Hello Ann:

      You do have Hypothyroidism from your TSH if it is 96.  I thought it was 0.96.   Heterogenous means "Uniform in structure" in my medical dictionary.  It just means the shape of the gland is uniform to what a thyroid should be shaped like. It is not about any lumps just shape.

      If it has lumps they would describe it as multinodular thyroid.

      Please take your Levo without food so it will not be blocked by food.  It is very important to do that.

      Let us know how you do.

      Shelly

      Report
    • Posted

      This is why I am confused.  Different interpretations.  I will advocate for my T's and anti tests and go from there.

       I was concerned if my thyroid is causing my breathing to be hard and face feeling full when I look down.  Also my face turns red and hard to breath when I wash or brush my hair.  I thought it might be my thyroid pushing on my throat.  It sounds like my thyroid is not that big tho.

      thanks for your input

      Report
    • Posted

      Hello Ann:

      Forget the words in the report,  if the thyroid is not working well, you will have nasty symptoms, like hair loss, muscle aches, weight gain, dry skin, no periods or infrequent ones, mental confusion,  etc..

      If you can't breathe, that is serious, and go to the A & E or Emergency room. Sometimes it goes down once the medication level is reached. 

      You may have a goiter that can happen if the thyroid is not working well and it can press on the throat. In some people it is removed.  Also from the words in the report you may have what I have which is Hashimoto's disease. So get the antibodies test done and that will let us know for sure.

      I would see an Endo since they know the gland well, and can order more  important tests to diagnose it.

      It takes about 6 to 8 weeks for the thyroid med, (Levo) to make a new level.  So you will need blood work later on.

      Keep us posted, many of us have been where you are now. It will get better.

      XO Shelly

       

      Report
    • Posted

      Hello Lucy:

      The TPOA antibodies test is done for Hashimoto's  and Graves disease. Normal range is 0-34. Sometimes they use a SED RATE test which measures inflammation in the body to determine autoimmune.

      This is normally ordered by an Endocrinologist.  Some GP's order it though.

      Shelly

      Report
    • Posted

      Hello Lucy

      Yes the TPOA antibody test is a good test and is reliable to detect autoimmune disease of the thyroid.

      SED RATE is also a test to see if there is inflammation in the body due to disease like autoimmune.

      Shelly

      Report

Join this discussion or start a new one?

New discussion

Report as inappropriate

Thanks for your help!

We want the forums to be a useful resource for our users but it is important to remember that the forums are not moderated or reviewed by doctors and so you should not rely on opinions or advice given by other users in respect of any healthcare matters. Always speak to your doctor before acting and in cases of emergency seek appropriate medical assistance immediately. Use of the forums is subject to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy and steps will be taken to remove posts identified as being in breach of those terms.

newnav-down newnav-up