Is this considered an inner ear issue or a brain issue?

Posted , 4 users are following.

My friend and her family went on a cruise for like a week. And when they all came home, they all had issues where they felt like they were still moving even though they were back on land. This feeling lasted for only like 2 days and they eventually felt back to normal so they’re fine now.

But can someone explain to me if this swaying/moving feeling after a cruise is considered an inner ear issue or is it a neurological issue? 

I thought maybe the brain just had to adjust being back on land and get used to it. But then my friend said that she should have taken decongestants right when she got back on land to avoid those swaying feelings. How would decongestants help with that?

0 likes, 8 replies

Report / Delete

8 Replies

  • Posted

    This is called Mal de debarquement.   It happens to me every time.   You can feel it if you go ashore in the middle of the cruise too.  When I get home, I also feel it for a couple of days.   It is really bad when in the shower and you closed your eyes. You have to be able to feel the wall.  I think it is an ear thing.     It is not pleasant but very temporary
    Report / Delete Reply
    • Posted

      This past weekend I was on the elevator 5 times. And every time I went down in an elevator and got out, it still felt like my body was still going down when I got off the elevator. The feeling only lasted for a few seconds and it went away as I kept walking. Is that considered mal de debarqument? Or is that something different?
      Report / Delete Reply
    • Posted

      Now, that I am not sure about.    That actually happens to me too.   Also we I set out of the elevator, I get this weird feeling like I am still going daown.   Think it is what you are having.    

      Try googling and see if you can find any infor on that.

      I know that after a cruise I feel like crap for a couple of days.   Not sure I will ever go on another.   I had it really bad when I took a cruise to Alaska.   Kinda scary

      Report / Delete Reply
    • Posted

      Is there anything I can do to avoid that weird feeling where my body still thinks it’s going down after I get off an elevator?

      Should I chew gum or try to make my ears pop..kinda like what someone would do in a plane when it’s descending? I might be using the elevator this weekend so I want to prepare for that.

      Report / Delete Reply
    • Posted

      I would think the popping of your ears would help.   I have to do that about 30 times  day, as my face fills with pressure, My nostril and left ear plugs, and I am all off balance.   I have to hold my nose and blow out just to pop my ear.   This happens everyday of my life.  So annoying
      Report / Delete Reply
  • Posted

    The feeling your friends had getting off the cruise ship for a few days, and the feeling you get after riding an elevator several times that persists for a very short duration is not uncommon. It is a sign of a sensitive vestibular system- motion sickness, and taking an OTC motion medication such as meclazine can help to prevent it and stop it once it starts. Mal de Embarquement, while having the same symptoms, is defined when those symptoms persist for long periods of time, long after the instigating event ended (event can be boat, elevator, rollercoaster, etc, etc). Thus the disorder is defined by persistence of the almost constant symptoms (I believe a month or more). What you describe here that lasts briefly, is a form of motion sickness or motion intolerance.
    Report / Delete Reply
    • Posted

      Thanks for the reply. Do you know of any techniques to avoid/reduce the weird feeling I get when going down in an elevator? Like is it better if I stand towards the back or front of the elevator? Should I look forward the whole time or keep my eyes closed? 

      I know it would probably be best to take stairs. But the place that I go up to is like a rooftop bar..and I don’t think there is any stairs to take there. They only have an elevator.

      Report / Delete Reply
    • Posted

      I don't know of any way to totally prevent it except for the meclazine, but you don't want to take that with alcohol!

      For me, elevators that have a smoother start and stop are better. Also, if there's anyway to take the elevator "non stop" to the roof, that is better than the stops/starts.

      Maybe try an experiment. Try bouncing up and down on your toes while on the elevator. Like heels up and down kinda fast. That might trick your brain into thinking that you're moving. At least try it during the stops/starts. I have no idea if it will work, but is easy to try!

      Report / Delete Reply

Join this discussion or start a new one?

New discussion Reply

Report or request deletion

Thanks for your help!

We want the forums to be a useful resource for our users but it is important to remember that the forums are not moderated or reviewed by doctors and so you should not rely on opinions or advice given by other users in respect of any healthcare matters. Always speak to your doctor before acting and in cases of emergency seek appropriate medical assistance immediately. Use of the forums is subject to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy and steps will be taken to remove posts identified as being in breach of those terms.

newnav-down newnav-up