Linx post-op

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Hey,

I had my linx operation 3 days ago. I live in Switzerland, and my surgeon helped with the development of the linx system.

I am experiencing some issues. I am bloated like crazy and I have dificulties belching. A few hours ago I had the urge to vomit and I wasn't able to. I have no issues with eating. The only pain I have is located in the shoulders.

I am a little bit concerned about the vomiting part. Is this something that gets better over time?

Thanks and best regards.

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14 Replies

  • Posted

    The doctor should have told you what to expect. Either contact the doctor or the hospital where you had the op done to see if this is normal.
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    • Posted

      Yes, I was informed about the side effects. I was told there won't be an issue with beclhing or vomiting. There is a slim chance that the linx device would be to tight, but this rarely happens.

      Since I don't have issues when eating and drinking I don't think that the device is too tight. This is why I wanted to ask people who had similar experiences.

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  • Posted

    Your shoulder pain is due to the air they pumped into your abdomen when you had surgery. It is a commonly reported side effect of any abdomnial surgery and usually goes in a day or two.

    I guess I'm lucky, I had 3 major abdominal operations (Nissen Fundoplication, cholecysectomy and Collis-Nissen revision) and didn't experience that.

    I was told I might experience problems burping or vomiting after my fundo but didn't experience that either.

    Linx is sold on the premise that it doesn't give burping or vomiting problems. I'm guessing they've made the "bracelet" too tight. With a tight fundo, they can provide endoscopic dilation (with a boogie) but I'm not sure how (if) that works with Linx.

    Hope they sort it out for you quickly. Let us know what they suggest and how you get on.

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    • Posted

      Hey Barretts,

      thanks a lot. I am hoping that this issue will resolve itself after some "stretching" through eating/drinking.

      I'll get in touch with my doc asap and will report back here.

      I read some of your posts here regarding the linx system. It seems like you are one of the "few" devils advocate on this topic. Did your opinion change during the last year? Just curious :-)

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    • Posted

      I am genuinely interested in seeing how recipients of the system fare. But I'm afraid, I'd personally recommend Nissen fundoplication to anyone instead of Linx but keeping an open mind.

      (It wasn't available when I had my first fundo and I wouldn't have been eligible anyway. But I'm happy with what I've had done.)

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    • Posted

      I am glad to hear that there are different opinions on this topic. Hiveminds are dangerous, especially in these delicate topics.

      I'll keep you updated.

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    • Posted

      Hi, do yo know if the nissen fixes LPR symptoms? I think I've read one comment that someone had it done and it hadn't helped.

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    • Posted

      A research paper published in the American Surgeon in 2011 entitled "Impact of Nissen fundoplication on laryngopharyngeal reflux symptoms", found, "The percentage of patients with symptom improvement after surgery were: heartburn (90.1%), regurgitation (92.6%), voice fatigue (75.2%), chronic cough (76.3%), choking episodes (83.1%), sore throat (82.9%), lump in throat (77.4%), repetitive throat clearing (72.8%), and adult-onset asthma (59.6%). Twenty per cent with repetitive throat clearing and 30 per cent with adult-onset asthma had no improvement in symptoms. "

      However, the meta-analysis "Impact of Laparoscopic Fundoplication for the Treatment of Laryngopharyngeal Reflux: Review of the Literature" published a year later in the International Journal of Otolaryngology, did find some discrepancies: "in theory, both GERD and LPR share a similar pathophysiology. Consequently, well-indicated antireflux surgery should be as effective for LPR as for GERD. Many studies have demonstrated symptomatic improvement after surgical fundoplication. However, the current knowledge presented by the literature does not allow this conclusion."

      The best answer therefore appears to be it probably does. It certainly did with me.

      Fundoplication reduces reflux at the lower oesophageal sphincter so there is little or nothing to reach the upper sphincter - so no reflux (LPR) should occur there. If there were to be symptoms of LPR after surgery, it would have to be from contents of the oesophagus that for some reason do not pass into the stomach but perhaps pool above the wrap.

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    • Posted

      Thank you for the detailed response, something to consider. How much of a normal lifestyle do you lead now - that is food consumption wise, all the no nos for gerd, coffee alcohol can you now tolerate these, or is is much the same - watch your diet, small amounts, etc

       

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    • Posted

      I actually never had a problem with coffee, alcohol etc. The "banned foods" lists are actually something of a propagated myth and unless they are a particular trigger for you, there's no need to avoid them. They may relax a normal lower oeosphageal sphincter facilitating reflux, but if it's already compromised by a hiatus hernia (which is most likely), then LOS relaxation is immaterial.

      Following my first Nissen fundoplication, the first few weeks, quantities and solidity of food needed to be watched as the internal scar tissue healed but I was eating normally after just a few weeks.

      However, my wrap cam undone a few years later following 5 hours violent retchin from Norovirus. I had a Collis-Nissen revision. The Collis bit reduces the size of the stomach to make a longer oesophagus to enable a larger, more effective, wrap. Two years later, I still need to eat small portions. eg I only have a half of a single round when I make a sandwich, I find I cannot manage some bread and if I eat too much, too quickly, I can suffer from Gastric Dumping Syndrome when the stomach dumps its contents into the duodenum too quickly. But I'm glad I had the surgery, it cured the debilitating reflux cough etc.

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    • Posted

      Thanks for sharing your experience. Yes, I "overenjoyed" the Christmas fare and have a scratchy throat and post nasal drip. Trying to stay off the leftovers and get back to the non trigger foods and eating smaller amounts.

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  • Posted

    A bit late to get onboard with this discussion but I had the linx procedure done 4 1/2 months ago. I never really had any problem belching after the procedure but have not had an "opportunity" to see if vomiting is possible. Everything is actually going quite well and have not had any dysphagia for at least a month now. I have been completely off of PPIs since a few days after the surgery. I probably take a couple of Gaviscon at least once a week after I have overdone it with jalapenos or other spicy food. 

    The first few months after this procedure were a bit troublesome with the dysphagia which seemed to peak around week 7 with me but I am very happy to have that past me and overall am very happy with the surgery results.

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    • Posted

      Hello I have the Linx fitted last week and apart from pain first day from the bloating it hadn't been bad, although yesterday & this evening I have had the worst pain ever (to point I'm walking about trying to get away from it/ ease it some how) when eating my evening meal, it happens after first mouthful and is sever pain around area it's fitted it last for about 20 minutes on and off but then eases so I can eat.

      I'm the first patient that has had this fitted by my surgeon in our area & it was overseen by the representative of the supplier, so I'm not worried it's too tight just not sure if this is normal settling in symptoms

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    • Posted

      I had the same experiences with mine. Walking about when having the pain seemed to help - or maybe it just got my mind off it until it subsided. It did take me about 6 months to get completely past that but now I seldom know the linx is there at all.

      I would suggest having your doctor perscribe something my doctor did. He called it "magic mouthwash". It is a pink liquid that is a combination of antacid/lidocane/diphenhydramine in a 1:1:1 ratio. It deadens the espohagus just enough to make it through this bad phase. My doctor suggest sipping 5 ml with a straw before a meal. You sip it to get it to the back of your throat and avoid your taste buds (or they'll go numb on you). I found that putting some into a travel squirt bottle sold at Container Store for shampoo worked better than the straw - I could squirt it directly at the back of my throat before a meal.

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