Long term effects of neuroleptic medications especially antipsychotic.

Posted , 3 users are following.

This discussion has been locked due to a period of inactivity. Start a new discussion

Ok this is a long shot and what I have to say is unbelievable, unfortunately it's also true.

For roughly 20 years I was on high doses of most of the medications in book (section 4 BNF, to be precise). These include roughly 6 weeks on 1000mg or 1gram chlorpromazine a day. And a prolonged period,over a year prehaps many years of 20mg Haloparidol, 600mg clozapine and the max dose venlafaxine daily. Despite this I still had breakthrough symptoms once a month. I was on Clozapine for a total of 17 years. I am forever grateful to the consultant who supervised my difercult titrated withdrawal.

I am symptom and medication freeand have been since 2013 when I had my ovaries removed.

But the question that nobody can answer is what long term physical damage all these medications have caused? I am well aware of the non physical harm these prescriptions caused but that's an elephant in the room better not point to it.

Before anyone says no physical harm has been caused, I will ask if long term use of illicit drugs would cause lasting harm. I do find it strange that a medication that can destroy your immune system does not cause long term harm and largactol does actually mean many actions.

I have also just had a MRI scan it should lesions in the white matter of my brain dates uncertain could be months old could be years.

Do I have the right to know what the treatment I received for my PreMenstrual Syndrome has done to me?

0 likes, 7 replies

Report

7 Replies

  • Posted

    Save all your tests and scans for later comparison
    Report
    • Posted

      Been refered to neurologist to find out if I have demylementation. Worry about dementia now. Want but don't want to Google the implications.

      Report
  • Posted

    Hello Ellie

    I do not know how old you are, however I do know medications where withdrawn in 2013.

    I will explain where I am coming from here

    My condition has been treated now since 1980 and have had to take Opiates and NSID medications since 1987. I have also taken AD medications on and off since 1968. What I am trying to say is we all have to make informed choices when it comes to medications. We have to ask ourselves are the contraindication of the drug worthwhile if our general health and medical problems are allowing you to carry on with life choices that would have not been possible if the medications had not been taken. It is a situation of cause and effect, we make these choices throughout our lifetimes and we make educated choices and advise from our GP and Specialists. What would happen if we did not make a positive decision as far as the drug is concerned.

    With my medications I will be taking my medications until I die, I would imagine there may be a shortening of my life, although there could be a lengthening of my life because of the medications, we just do not know. 

    Ask yourself what would have been the alternative with regards to your health. I know what my life would have been possibly like, I will never know what the drugs are doing with me now. Life is a journey where we make all these informed decisions. I am not a health professional so my views are my own. If I was to put the clock back to the 1930s at my proper age I would have been in a wheelchair or dead by the relevent date. In fact when I was born I needed a life saving operation, that op did not exist in the 1930s. You are really asking what if, in this case we need to be more understanding of the pathways we take through Life and death

    Keep a hold

    BOB

     

    Report
    • Posted

      I never would have chosen to take any of the meds. Unfortunately they are all psychiartiric meds. I didn't have a choice. Its hard to not take a medication when you are pinned to the floor and its injected into you. The only chioce any psychiartic patient ever has with regards to mediction is take it (comply with treatment) or be locked on a hospital ward and told you lack insight into your illness. Not really much of a choice. You also find out about side effect6s the hard way. If you have the courage to mention them (some are personal and embarressing) someone else then judges whether you should put up with them. Usualy the answer is its better that you continue taking the meds. Things are starting to change there is a move away from complience towards concordance, understanding your meds but still having to take them. Change is slow one day there might be a move away from concordance towards informed choice. Unfortunately for me the damage appears to have been done.

      Report
    • Posted

      A few months ago I was taken around several High risk wards in hospital and also I was taken around short term wards that I found interesting as I remember visiting this hospital in the 70s.

      There had been many changes and in places was taken aback at the way patiens were been treated and looked after. 

      In the past I remember visiting wards and going down passageways built like a rabbit warren the passages had been changed although the same. 

      i am not a medical professional, just a lay person and like you I do hope things change as far as the Sectioned are concerned. All I can say, in places now hospitals are now been built that will have better outlooks for patients suffering mental health conditions, like me

      BOB

      Report
    • Posted

      The outlooks are getting better. No more dorms, seperate areas for males and females including bedrooms. This helps mitergate the risk of male patients raping female patients. However care is patchy and completely dependant of staff attitude. therefore can change from ward to ward and even shift to shift. I used to be a student MH nurse and have worked as a HCA. But today I am proud of my past spent in hospitals and my current involvement with MH services (client). I see it as recognition of trauma endoured. I have met some awesome incredibly brave and strong people who were patients. Sadly not all are still with us but there is no blame attached to their deaths in my eyes. Just rememberance and grateitude for the honour they gave me when they trusted me enough to let me sit with them in their pain. Things are changing but not fast enough and there is a risk of things going backward. I hope they don't. Peace and love smile

      Report
    • Posted

      Hello Ellie

      I spent time with PACE and was shown around general short term Womens  Ward it was in an old part of the hospital, it was tired although the rooms comfortable and patients had their own rooms,

      Yes I understand these hospitals are old and the NHS is strapped for cash, they have to work with what they have from the State

      Keep a hold

      BOB

      Report

Join this discussion or start a new one?

New discussion

Report as inappropriate

Thanks for your help!

We want the forums to be a useful resource for our users but it is important to remember that the forums are not moderated or reviewed by doctors and so you should not rely on opinions or advice given by other users in respect of any healthcare matters. Always speak to your doctor before acting and in cases of emergency seek appropriate medical assistance immediately. Use of the forums is subject to our Terms of Use and Privacy Policy and steps will be taken to remove posts identified as being in breach of those terms.

newnav-down newnav-up