Lower back pain caused by hip arthritis?

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I'm new to this forum but have used the forum on knee replacement a lot, having had a TKR 18 months ago. I've recovered pretty well from that (although it's been a long haul) but am now concerned about my hip. I've been diagnosed with arthritis there but want to try to avoid a replacement for as long as possible. My question to fellow sufferers of hip arthritis is do you also get pain in your lower back? My pain is worse at the back of my pelvis. I exercise and use various treatments including visits to a chiropractor but nothing really cures it. I just wonder if, even if I were to get the hip replaced, I would still suffer from this lower back pain. It is just on the one side (same side as the arthritic hip and the opposite one to my knee replacement).  I'd be interested to hear from any other sufferers.

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  • Posted

    If you have tried a chiropracter - have you ever tried Bowen therapy? I had severe low back pain and an orthopaedic doctor told me it was wear and tear (aka arthritis) and I'd have to live with it. Since I couldn't stand or walk for more than 10 minutes or so at the age of 60 that wasn't what I wanted to hear!

    Eventually it was diagnosed as sacroiliac inflammation due to muscle spasm in my back muscles and something called myofascial pain syndrome. The local pain clinic (who recognised what the problem was) did steroid injections to relieve the spasms and some manual techniques which eventually sorted it (I reacted badly to the first line fast treatment here in Italy) but I also get a lot of benefit from Bowen therapy. If it will work for you and your problem you will know within 3 sessions - if there is no change at all in that time it probably isn't worth carrying on but if there is a difference more may help even more. One lady I know though did carry on because she found it so relaxing and uplifting, like a massage or spa treatment - and after about 10 sessions the pain was going too.So the 3 isn't a hard and fast rule it seems!

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    • Posted

      Thanks so much for your interesting reply. Having researched my pain I had concluded it was the sacroillac joint that was involved. I haven't consulted an orthopaedic specialist about it but wondered whether to try to get an appointment with the one who did my knee as he told me to get in touch if my hip worsened. The fact that you got relief with treatment is encouraging. I have read about Bowen therapy but don't know if there are any therapists in my area (South Wales, UK). I'll have to do some research. Thanks again, Eileen.
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    • Posted

      Try bowen-technique, bowendirectory and there is one welshbowentherapy in Monmouthshire - depending on where you are. The first 2 are general directories but good therapists don't have to be registered with either of the umbella organisations. It really is a case of try it - and does that therapist work for you. Good luck.
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  • Posted

    Generally if anything is out of line it will affect everything above. I have been told that often pain in the knee is actually referred pain from the hip often ... Usually people have multiple problems all related ... For temporary side-effect pain relief I find leaning against a tennis ball - pushing into my spine quite high up helps a lot. Tennis balls are great for leaning into tight muscles to break up knots too. Regular deep massage can be really helpful too while awaiting other advice and therapies.
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    • Posted

      Thanks. I've used a tennis ball a lot for another problem I've had on my other side after my knee replacement. I've suffered from a tight piriformis muscle (in the buttock) which has caused sciatica type pain. I've used the tennis ball to press on the muscle and it has helped. 
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    • Posted

      Ah the piriformus ... I thought that was my problem until my hip arthritis diagnosis ... but I also have a back problem ... I have read that general inflammation is the underlying problem with many things so diet is crucial ... I am quite newly diagnosed so still on a steep learning curve but I think diet is crucial and I also think avoiding painkillers seems to help as it allows you to respond to pain with rest and careful movement which avoids triggering other problems without noticing and I wonder if it also helps the brain to try to fix where the problem is. Fasting to lose weight has made me feel moments of huge improvement without painkillers but I have not yet figured out what I am eating that makes me feel worse. Suspect wheat! I already eat little fat and little dairy ... Supplements I have been recommended are glucosamine chondroitin (vets are sure they work for dogs!) glycine, lots of oily fish and broths (from boiled bones) plus iron, vit C vit D (3000 units plus sunbathing) ... Doing a lot better than I was ... Rowing machines and adductor/abductor ones and core strengthening exercises .... swimming and walking in water forwards and backwards and sideways and cycling .... I am lucky not to need to work right now but hope to get fit enough to again ... oh and avoid lifting and if you do then do NOT twist with a load (applies for hip and back problems)
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