LS related to other conditions???

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Hi everyone, I keep reading messages asking if other ladies/men on here have a variety of other conditions that could be related to LS. I have had asthma since the age of 30, I'm now 58, but I don't attribute it to my LS. I also have had small discoid excema for a number of years, but although it's another type of autoimmune disease, I also don't believe there's a link. The cause for me is most certainly low hormones, and that's it. As most of us on here are post-menopausal women, it's obvious to me that this stage of life with inevitably bring health issues anyway. My view is, just because we may have LS, mine is in remission since diagnosis and treatment, it doesn't mean everything can be attributed to it.

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16 Replies

  • Posted

    Yes I'm 55 have been hypo thyroid since 40. Endometrial ablation at 51

    And Alopexia Area this last year.. having steroid shots in my head is helping but the LS started that time.

    Diagnosed last month after biopsy.

    I look and feel good and hope my course of action prescribed by my Dr works! (Clobe) a six month regimen.

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  • Posted

    Yes, for sure! Auto immune diseases come In packs and apparently they can be grouped. Why our bodies turn on themselves I do not know! 

    There is so much that is not known. Research can never cover everything that needs to be covered. We can try to do our own research but some investigations and studies need to have been made. 

    Because LS is rare so are studies into it!

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  • Posted

    Totally, I choose to not wallow, be pro active and would not settle for a Dr. That did not care. It's not the end of the world. The WORST part for me is the temporary abstinence from intimacy with my Husband.

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  • Posted

    I may sound controversial to some of you, but you even admit there's so little known about LS and lots of diseases are auto-immune anyway. But I know for sure that all my problems stemmed from the menopause, including LS. It's probably the menopause which causes the body to attack itself. It was due to low hormones that I was diagnosed with Complex Atypical Hyperplasia of the endometrium, a precancerous condition, and due to being intolerant to HRT systemically I opted for a hysterectomy before cancer developed. I also became borderline hypothyroid for a short time, but thankfully my body corrected itself. Hormones or the lack of them can be very destructive, and that's what I blame the LS on.

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    • Posted

      LS has nothing to do with menopause.....it is an autoimmune disease which affects the skin. The menopause does not cause the body to attack itself....that is the autoimmune disease. There is no such thing as borderline hypothyroid....you either have it or you do not.....an autoimmune disease. The body attacks the thyroid gland...once you have an autoimmune disorder, other follow.....
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  • Posted

    Hi! I have had asthma for a while but only became worse around the age of 38 (now 59) and had LS for around 20 years! My skin has always been reactive to insect bites etc etc! My mum has Lichen Planus, Aunt died in 2007 from cancer of vulva! I have just recently had a BIOPSY which confirmed LS and NO nasty cells! I also had an operation at the same Time to unfuse certain areas! Thankful that I have an amazing dermatologist who listened and referred me for the op! My LS is controlled with clob and the intimate part of my marriage (which just couldn't happen for nearly 2 years) has returned!

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  • Posted

    Diabetes is a big player in LS.....hypothyroidism, an under active thyroid all autoimmune diseases. Many years ago I was diagnosed with an under active thyroid, later it developed into hypothyroidism, putting me at high risk in getting diabetes, which I got and LS came along with diabetes. Menopause has nothing to do with LS.....

    You can be in remission for months or longer....but one day it will flare up again, it will never go away for good. Watching your diet, particularly the sugar intake....stress is a big trigger also. 

     

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    • Posted

      Maybe you're not post-menopausal, but most women in this group are, you're obviously unlucky. As soon as menopause hit me, then so did all my health issues. I was borderline hypothyroid for a short while, but my body corrected itself, and my blood tests show I'm bang in the normal range since. And regarding diabetes, I was told after my most recent blood tests last year that my blood sugar was well controlled, but I still developed LS, but that happened about a year after my hysterectomy, and being post-menopausal. I'm not complacent about diabetes, because although I'm very active, I've got more fat around my belly than is healthy, so trying to lose some weight.

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    • Posted

      I am very glad for you about hypothyroid.....LS, diabetes, hypothyroid it is like a sisterhood. Reducing your BMI through a low carb diet and exercise, cut the sugar intake right down.

      Good Luck

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  • Posted

    I also have other minor autoimmune conditions: psoriasis of the scalp, dry eye/blepharitis.  I always understood that once you were susceptible to one, you would be more susceptible to all.  These did all start happening to me post menopause. Wrt intercourse, masses of coconut oil works for me. Best wishes to everyone here.
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    • Posted

      Totally agree....I have hypothyroidism for some time and have been at high risk in getting diabetes. I did get it and LS as well.........I am not post menopausal. I suffer terribly with blepharitis , dry eyes...I had them capped to hold my artificial tears longer. Always looking for things to help me with my dry eyes.

      .

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  • Posted

    I see a lot of responses relating it to menopause and in that individuals case could be true. However, I think I have suffered from ls all my life, it did not blow up until I had my first child. Anyway I think if you are susceptible to autoimmune conditions you get more as you get older. For instance, I came down with my first two ai skin conditions in my 20's, ls diagnosed in my 30's, now a eye ai condition in my 50's. Blood work shows my hormones in normal range. I just think some are susceptible to ai, and even with the pain of dealing with the conditions I have still count myself lucky compared to some autoimmune conditions that others have.

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    • Posted

      Yes I agree 33beth, no two people are ever the same with the same conditions. And that would include triggers too of course. Everyone is unique, and so are our symptoms.
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