May now be having a TKR instead of a PKR... Thoughts?

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Hiya Friends...so a bit of a twist. Up till now, I was definitely having a Mako PKR on 7/26. However, I have been having pain (although milder than the medial) on the lateral side. It's also not consistent like the medial. I mentioned it to my surgeon 2 weeks ago, but he was still in favor of the partial. The lateral pain continued, but again, still milder and not constant.

Thursday, I had my CT-scan for Mako "mapping." Friday, my surgeon's PA called me and said I should consider a TKR as my surgeon now feels if the lateral symptoms progress, I could need a TKR down the line, He based his suggestion on what I told him, seeing evidence of arthritic issues on the CT-scan as well as on previous MRI's. (again, not as severe as the medial, but there nonetheless)

It was actually a relief to me as I had been wondering the same. I would REALLY hate to go through the PKR experience (which can be brutal too) onl to need a total in the future. Also, knowing partials can have higher failure rates and with the Mako being too new for long term results data, I have to say I was nervous having it.

Would love to know your thoughts...surgery is 7/26 and I want to be as prepared as possible! Thank you so much...this Forum is the BEST!

Linda

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  • Posted

    LindaSue, from what I've heard from more than one person, they wished they had a TKR instead of the PKR. Down the road they all had to go back years later for a total. Best of luck to you.

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    • Posted

      Eizie...I have been hearing the same. I know I surely do not want to have a 2nd major operation like this if it can be avoided. Thanks for your reply.
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  • Posted

    LindaSue, I think you are better off going for the TKR. You only want to go through this type of surgery once not twice. Trust your Dr. I am sure he knows the best plan for you. I wish you the best of luck and a good recovery. Dolores😀

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    • Posted

      Hi Dolores, I so agree with you! I'm pretty much "there." I think I'm still getting used to the idea I'm even having surgery when just a month ago I still doing cortisone shots. But after 2 rounds of gel shots, arthroscopy, multiple weeks of PT and lots of pain, I think the game plan has to change. Thanks for your reply and good wishes!

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    • Posted

      LindaSue, I had the same experience as you. First I got a round of the gel shots which did absolutely nothing. Then, the Dr. gave me the cortisone shots, which didn't help either. I thought I was going to have a meniscus repair which showed on a previous MRI. When I went to visit the Ortho he was going to view that MRI and I told him I feel much worse so he took an X-ray in the office. When he showed me the films he said things had changed and now I was bone on bone. When he told me He couldn't do the meniscus repair that now it was total knee replacement I started crying in the office. I was not prepared for that! My story sounds just like yours, but now after 5 months things are looking a lot brighter. Good luck to you and keep us posted on your recovery. Dolores

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    • Posted

      Hi Dolores...oooooh how well I can relate to what you went through! And like you I was so not prepared to now need a total knee. I have the rest of my year planned and surgery was definitely not part of the deal! LOL It's so encouraging to hear at 5 months post-op things are looking more positive for you. I hope I can say the same at that point! Best of luck with your continued recovery and I will certainly keep you posted! Linda

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  • Posted

    Hi LindaSue,

    I would definitely be going for the TKR.  Firstly your recovery from the PKR would be difficult because of the surgery, coupled with the lateral pain.

    I think it's a great opportunity for you. Get it all out of the way with the one op.

    Good luck, let us know ...

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    • Posted

      Hi Cheryl,

      I appreciate your frankness...what you are saying seems so logical to me! My only hold back is my lateral pain is not nearly as severe as the medial...nor is it constant. So part of me thinks I should retain as much as my own limbs as possible. But my gut says, just go for the TKR! and be done with it. Thanks for your reply...will keep you posted!

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  • Posted

    Hi LindaSue,

    ?I had a partial knee replacement aged 71 on 6 Nov 2015. Right knee, medial compartment affected by severe Osteoarthritis (OA) on the site of sporting injuries when I was at High School and later decades in life. Surgeon gave me the option, and fully discussed with me my options, of a partial and a total.  He agreed to do the partial - providing when he 'went in' and had a look there was no sign of other parts of the knee affected by OA.

    I scored a partial.

    ?One thing though, in which there is escaping, the recovery process, the pain and agony of doing PT in the recovery process and the emotional upheaval, the loss of sleep and all that crap is EXACTLY the same for both partial and TKR. Having a partial does not mean you are gonna 'get off lightly'.

    ?I am likely to get at least 15 years out of my implant. by then I'll be 86 +. I am pretty fit, even though I have a heart arrythmia. I still work 30 hours a week driving a tourist bus and handling large numbers of passengers luggage most weighing over 15 kgs. So if needed I reckon I'd be considered fit enough to cope with a further replacement later. But to be honest, there is no other arthritis in my body so I don't think that will be necessary anyway.

    ?One thing I did do before and after surgery was this - I got my sports injury massage therapist to work on toning up my upper and lower leg muscles before surgery so thatI presented my surgeon with a leg that was in the best possible condition for him to carry out his act of butchery. AND IT IS BUTCHERY ! Afterwards, when my dressing was removed and it was confirmed I was infection free, I returned to my therapist for her to massage the incision line and surrounding area - she used Aloe Vera Gel - in order to prevent scar tissue forming. If scar tissue forms then your PT becomes quite difficult to manage and will slow up your recovery significantly. My stitches were staples of the self disolving type.

    Job done.

    ?May the force be with you.

    John

     

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    • Posted

      Hi John,

      Thank you so much for taking the time to share your thoughts. I really appreciate your honesty about your experience. It still amazes me how many people report that the recovery process and all that goes along with it (loss of sleep, depression, pain, PT, etc.) can be just as extensive as a TKR. My logical mind keeps insisting that just cannot be so. After reading so many stories here in addition to my research I now know differently, but still it's difficult to understand.

      Kudos to you for staying fit and working at a job that is physically demanding. Obviously, your positive attitude is helping tremendously to make this possible!

      I completely agree with you about getting your leg into the best shape possible before surgery. I have been working with a personal trainer who is also a physical therapist for over 6 years and he has created a whole regimen of strengthening exercises for the gym and at home for prior to surgery. He also massages my leg during our sessions.

      Ahhh the butchery that many have decribed! I cannot lie and tell you that doesn't scare me, because it does. I have had various surgeries and sailed through (including an extensive abdominoplasty after a large weight loss to remove excess skin...but that wasn't cutting through bone) Last November was my arthroplasty to fix 2 torn menisci. I also had microfracture done (pinpoint holes made in the bone to make it bleed which is supposed to promote cartilage growth) which was my first experience with bone pain. Although I was off narcotics in a few days, the pain persisted for months from it. But I coped very well. However, the pain described from knee replacements sounds like a "whole different animal" and does make me nervous. I do have a great team in place, so onward I will go! 

      Thank you again for your insight and may you continue with good health and always be able to be as active as you are!

      Linda

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    • Posted

      Hi Linda,

      Many thanks for your reply and good wishes.

      I am so glad for you that you have got your leg health (so to speak) up to the mark.Its not a waste of time in my view as - although its hard to imagine - a healthy leg is gonna pay dividends post op.

      ?For me at the time I remember that I was scared of damaging the implant and that it was the source of the pain. Wrong ! Yes, the new implant needed to be treated with respect it was all the tissue damage that I didn't understand. Thank goodness my therapist did ! Nowadays I can't even remember what the pain was like - but - it was there.

      ?Anyway, good luck - you'll be fine. Just keep those exercises going post op.

      John

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