Maybe astma and not COPD

Posted , 11 users are following.

I have had two PA's tell me I have COPD . But lung function was pretty normal. So went to to doctor and talked to him. He is thinking maybe asthma instead. So more checking and test. So now what. I quit taking my inhalers, an advair. Until I know for sure..

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  • Posted

    Hi jeana!

    I was MISDIAGNOSED with asthma 7 years ago. My GP (at that time) said "well, I think you have asthma".  5 1/2 years later my CURRENT GP said "I find it hard to believe at age 69 you are suddenly diagnosed with asthma.  There is SOMETHING going on and we're going to find out what it is".  He sent me for a CT scan and I was PROPERLY diagnosed with COPD.  I feel that many years were wasted because of an improper diagnosis.  I would suggest that you DEMAND that your doctor order a CT scan for you.  If he/she just dismisses it as not important.............get another opinion.

     

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  • Posted

    Hi jean, i was diagnosed with ipf 2 and half years ago, in jan my consultant told me about a new treatment, but it had to be recomended by wythenshaw hospital, i duly had an appointment and the specialist said i havn`t got ipf but it looks like emphasemia, i then had all the tests and scans again including a lung biopsy, that was in june, now i can`t get an appointment for a diagnosis until october!!that will be 4 months after the biopsy!!
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  • Posted

    Sorry, but what's a PA?  

    If your lung function improves with ventolin during the spirometry test you have asthma, if not, not.    It's a good idea to not use inhalers for a day or two before spirometry testing, because obviously using them masks your levels and makes it difficult or impossible to get a clear diagnosis - is that why you've stopped using the inhaler?

    The two most common conditions under the COPD umbrella are ashtma (difficulty breathing in) and emphysema (difficulty breathing out, so carbon dioxide stays in the lungs and makes it difficult to breathe in) - spirometry testing will clarify your condition and get you a diagnosis.

     However, apart from different medication, the management of any COPD conditoin is pretty much the same - get to rehab, don't smoke or be around smokers, exercise, breathing techniques and medication.

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  • Posted

    Jude.......PA is a US term.   I believe that they can handle most things other than surgery and invasive techniques.  A PA is more highly educated than a Physicians Nurse.  Where are you located, Jude???
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    • Posted

      Australia:  What do Physicians' Nurses do?   It sounds to me as if a PA is similar to or the same as our Practice Nurses, who can also do most things except prescribe medication or do surgery.  They're invaluable, especially in remote areas where doctors are few and VERY far between.   

      I've had only good experiences with them, both where in live now in the country and when I lived in a remote Aboriginal community:  in the former case they're not stand alone but work within medical clinics and in the latter case had access to gp's and specialists via teleplhone, probably skype now.

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    • Posted

      Hi Jude... PA's here in the U.S. can prescribe medicine just like doctors, except that depending on the clinic they work at, a medical doctor needs to sign off on Patient charts (for any of the patients a PA cared for for the day). A nurse practitioner here in the U.S. Can also prescribe meds and can sign their own charts though they are considered one below a PA. I'll never understand that but PA's have a bit more restrictions than a Nurse practitioner.
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  • Posted

    Hi jeana45051,

    Jude gives a good example of copd and emphysema.  I'm no doctor; I'm studying to become a nurse.  I hope you haven't stopped taking your inhalers and such just yet.  Try calling your doctor (or nurse) and ask them what they think you should before stopping your meds completely.  If they say to stop taking it till they figure out what you have, then stop taking them. I personally think you should continue taking your inhalers until you call them and ask about it or if they actually come to a conclusion as to what you might have. I hope you get to feeling better soon.

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