Microspic blood in urine

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Hello, Here I am.... aged 60+ with inviisble blood in my urine on 3 tests (3+,1+ and 2+ on test strips). Blood count normal,  no other symptoms at all.My Doctor has referred me for a cystocopy et al on the urgent 2W pathway. However, this disagrees with the NICE guidelines which state that Microscopic blood, on an over 60, should be accompanied by either increased white blood cell count or Disuria. I have neither. Is the Doctor doing me favour by fast tracking me or has he just got it wrong? Any thoughts from someone who knows please? Thanks.

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  • Posted

    Would you happen to be a runner?  I once had microscopic blood in my urine, and my doctor attributed it to my running.  That was at least 40 years ago.
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  • Posted

    Would you happen to be a runner?  I once had microscopic blood in my urine, and my doctor attributed it to my running.  That was at least 40 years ago.
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    • Posted

      Hi Glenn - Thanks for your reply. Well I haven't done a 5K at the gym for at least - well - since yesterday. To be honest I have heard this before, so I have stopped excercising the day before a urine submission and it didn't make any difference. But I just get a feeling it maybe connected.

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    • Posted

      Google shows that it's a common phenomenon.  It's called Exercise Induced Hematuria.

      I cut and pasted this from a site called UPTODate.

      "ETIOLOGY AND PATHOGENESIS

      Hematuria has been described after a variety of forms of exercise [1,4,5]. These include contact sports, such as football and boxing, and noncontact sports, such as long-distance (marathon or endurance) running [6-8], rowing, and swimming. Hematuria appears to be rare with cycling but has been described, even with stationary bike riding (eg, spinning) [9,10].

      The frequency with which hematuria occurs with long-distance running was evaluated in a study of 45 male and female participants who competed in an ultra long-distance marathon [6]. After the race, 11 (24 percent) had hematuria. The hematuria disappeared within seven days. A similar incidence (18 percent) was noted in a report of 50 marathon runners who did not have hematuria on prerace samples obtained daily for three days [11]."

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    • Posted

      Yes, that is interesting. For sure, I'm no marathon runner, after about 10K things start to fall off! However it's rare that 24 hours passes without my working out, doing a treadmill run or some form of other energetic excercise. (Long walk intensive gardening et al.) It's difficult - and maybe it's best to investigate and be safe than sorry. However, the danger of irrelevant over investigation still remains with it's inherent misery. One day they will find out, until then it's a matter of trying to do the right thing. Cystoscopy here we come, I guess.

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