Mirtazapine and Nightmares

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Hello  I  stopped Seroxat because of awful nightmares and was put on Fluoxetine which after 12 weeks did not work for me - I have now been prescribed Mirtazapine 15mg as I am desperate to get rid of my nightmares which are really frightening and to feel better - has anyone experienced weird nightmares whilst taking Mirtazapine? Thank You

 

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  • Posted

    I take 15 mg. mirtazapine.  I have vivid dreams but not nightmares.   The mirtazapine does make me sleepy. I crave afternoon naps.  A friend swears by mirtazapine.  She said it saved her life.  Give it a try.  Remembr it takes a few weeks to kick in.  My depression is rather mild.   Perhaps more sadness than real depression.  .
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  • Posted

    Hi

    All I seem to hear from people is horror story's about antidepressants . It seems that every AD has the most awfull side affects, I have givin up on AD's now after 30 years on them because all they have done for me is to make me feel worse. The only reason I was on them for so long is because the phyciatrist convinced me that I needed them because I have a chemical Imbalance. I have done a lot of research lately and found out that there is no such thing, medical sience has no way of knowing this as yet. The only reason they tell you have a chemical imbalance is because they don't have any other explanation. I have come of all my meds now and have never felt better. I'm saying that people should stop taking there meds as some people say they help but as for me they don't. I have found that a healthy diet and exercise work much better for me so I'm done with so called antidepressants for good

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    • Posted

      Hi Michael,

      Im sorry to hear you had such a struggle with anti-depressants - I have had my battles with the medical profession too! _ but it isnt true to say there is 'no such thing as a chemical imbalance'.

      There is lots of evidence about dopamine, serotonin, GABA and cortisol levels in the brain. They may not be able to identify the precise mechanisms that enable different meds to work in releiving depression, but that doesnt mean they dont work - there is far too much evidence of their life-saving properties for that. 

      However, you are quite right that cases of mild depression, anxiety and other less severe mental illness can often be eased considerably by diet, exercise, work-life balance, creative pursuits, and being more realistic about your goals/realities of life. Many people drive themselves near-insane with unnecessary stress - make themselves ill by falling prey to the promises of advertisers that they can have the 'perfect life' - perfect body - that they should be gloriously happy and healthy 100% of the time and if they are not, its their own fault for not being 'positive' enough or working hard enough, etc etc. 

      It can be very liberating to realise that you dont have to be on that treadmill - you can leave the rat race to all the other rats and just be yourself. I really worry about and feel for young people these days - imagine growing up with facebook and internet porn and airbrushed photos of perfect models every which way you turn, making you feel imperfect and  low-acheiving all the time Its practically a recipe for mental distress!

      Some people suffer from such severe and recurrent depression that their very life is at risk - we should never, ever forget that Mental illnesses have Mortality rates, people do take their own lives and there is the risk factors from the self-medicating that people do when they cant stand the pain and distress eg drugs, drink, not eating, overeating, sexual problems, etc. So I'm glad to see your correcting your typo to say people shouldnt stop taking their meds if they work for them. Id also like to add that you do have to keep going back to the doctor and letting them know if the meds arent working - doctors arent psychic and if a drug hasnt worked for you within about 16 weeks then its never going to work so you should go back to the Docs and ask to try something else: I had tried soooooooo many til I tried mirtazipine and it was literally like a miracle for me,  couldnt beleive what a difference it made.

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  • Posted

    Sorry I meant to say people should NOT Stop taking there meds as they seem to work for them
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  • Posted

    Hello Grace (what a beautiful name)

    I have a long history of mental health problems (i have bipolar 1 but for a long time was only treated for the depressions before being correctly rediagnosed). So I have been on pretty much every anti-depressant available, and I have experienced bad dreams, nightmares, weird dreams and eidetic imagery (vivid imagery playing in front of your eyes when you close your eyes to try to sleep) - with virtually all of them. Unfortunately its a sign that they are working! - it means stuff is happening inside your brain that will eventually make you better.

    However I coimpletely sympathise with how distressing they can be. Waking up with a jolt at 3am and having to put the lights, radio, telly anything on to try to banish the horrible feelings of terror, surreality, horror etc... its no fun.

    I keep a bedside lamp within very easy reach and a soothing book by the side of the bed (something really calm and easy, like a cookbook or a gardening book or anything with pictures like a 'coffee table' art book) to lull you off to sleep with nice images in your mind, and to pick up if you wake in the night.

    Also be kind to yourself whilst waiting for the mirtazipine to work which can take up to 8 weeks - and you will notice the emotional improvement last of all. Then you will look back and realise, actually from about 4 weeks onward things like appetite, work, relationships were getting a little bit easier even if you didnt start to feel happier in yourself til about 8 weeks of treatment.

    Mirtazipine saved my life too. I was in severe, suicidal depression with schizoid features (I was completely withdrawn, wouldnt leave the house, had hallucinations and delusiona thinking). Within 5 weeks the improvement was dramatic. I fully beleive if I had not taken mirtazipine i would have taken my own life. So your Doc has realy given you a good medicine that really does help. 

    15mg is a nice safe low starting dose - but mirtazipine is also a bit unusual in that it is more sedating at lower doses. So the doctor is trying to help your sleep by giving you an anti-D that helps you have deeper sleep and should therefore lessen the number of nightmares you have. I certainly found I was much, much better with mirtazipine than the bizarre dreams I got with other meds!! As your sleep patterns get better the number and severity of bad dreams will dramatically improve.

    I really hope you have the same experience as myself and so many others find with Mirtazipine: that your doctor prescribed it is a very good sign that they are taking you seriously. Now you just need to take it easy - slow down, and just make sure you get plenty of rest as well as sleep, eat well, bit of fresh air and exercise if you are up to it ... Reallly take it easy on social activities for now as they can occasion stressful interactions which may not be helpful. You're ill - for now, all you are expected to do is look after yourself and take that pill every night without fail!

    All the best for a good recovery x

     

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    • Posted

      Thank you so much Christine for the hope and encouragement that you have given me tonight - I have taken onboard yojur suggestions and hopefully in about 8 weeks at the most I can say I am feeling better although at the moment I feel I am in for a rough ride but will do my best to overcome this horrible mental illness - Kind Regards Grace
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    • Posted

      Anytime Grace -and feel free to private message me if you ever feel alone and want some reassurance - i know only too well what that feels like.

      it IS a rough ride - but mirtazipine is a very good anti-depressant, and even if it doesnt turn out to be the right one for you, there are many many others your doctor can try until you find the one for you. Unfortunately its not yet possible to do a brain x-ray or test that will show clearly and immediately which medicine will work! so its only thru persevering and keep trying that you will get better. But I really feel that mirtazipine will probably work for you as it does for so, so many people: it seems to be fast becoming the first line treatment with many GPs because they get such good results with it.

      There are lots of other things you will discover along the way that help YOU personally: just a few examples, I found that the type of music i listen to has a big impact - when I am depressed I have to put away any music that is angry, sad, or lyrics that encourage me to feel self-pity or hopelessness - I find classical music much better while I am recovering, with no lyrics at all to disturb my mind. I also find that alcohol is an absolute no-no while I am depressed and recovering: it disturbs your mind, body, sleep and also your behaviour which can lead you to feel even more worried and down. You will discover other things yourself which will help - just be open minded.

      Biggest advice of all; strictly and ruthlessly IGNORE anybody who tells you: its your fault - its about self-control/self-discipline/positive thinking - all you need is acupuncture/hypnosis/herbalist/homeopathy (dont waste your time money or hope on any of thes while you are very poorly and your judgement is disturbed its just too risky - or to come off your meds cos theyre a 'crutch' or 'unnatural'. Just remember arsenic volcanoes and cancer are also natural.....

      Im not saying when you start to recover you might find things like counselling, massage therapy, and diet/supplements helpful. Just that while you are so very poorly you wont get much benefit out of anything  - you wont take it in, and that'll make you feel like a failure.

      HEres a good book you could read to get more info:

      Depression:Curse of the Strong by Dr T Cantopher

      TAke care of yourself x

       

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    • Posted

      Your advice to Grace is excellent.  As my main problem is sadness at the loss of my husband of 43 years I have to avoid love songs which were popular when we were young.  They make me miss him all the more. Anything that causes one to become depressed and  which exacerbates ones depression or anxiety must be avoided.   
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    • Posted

      Hello Christine Thank you again for your advice. I found it interesting that you too experienced the need to have a light beside your bed and easy to read books - I too thought of that and had a gardening book beside me - I also ask my poor husband to wake me up if I cry out in my sleep or start jumping about  in bed because of the dream content - unfortunately at this moment in time I dont seem to do these things so often so the dreams just gone on and on throught the night and stay with me for a while after I wake up which often makes me very tearful- I blame I think the damage Seroxat has done to me after taking 40mg  for 15 years and reducing this over a period of one month to another tablet. I think Seroxat stays in your system for a very long time. I am trying to take each day as it comes just now and think I am over the stigma associated with mental health to a certain extent - it is just something many many people are cused with - thanks Christine I will pm you if I need your very kind offer of help   
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  • Posted

    I hope that you will give mirtazapine a try.  It is well regardto you it may take awhile before you experience any noticeable benefits, but stay with it.  If after a month of so and you are suffering from side effects or are  not experiencing any positive results do discuss it with your physician.  Above all do not stop it "cold turkey". You could experience unpleasant withdrawal symptoms. One must taper off gradually which your doctor will advise you about.   I truly hope mirtazapine will help you as it has others. Good luck from Long Island, NY
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    • Posted

      Hello Vicky Thank you so much for taking the time to reply and for your kind words of reassurance - my GP is very kind and understanding and I would not hesitate to contact her again if needed - I have an appointment for 3 weeks time and hopefully I will be able to report a bit of an improvement - maybe the dreams will disappear. And no I would never stop abruptly as I did one with Seroxat - it was a dreadful experience and I learnt my lesson then . Thank you again
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  • Posted

    Thank you Grace for your reply.  I'm happy you have a compassionate doctor which can make a lot of difference for all of us who suffer.  Sincere good wiishes to you for a complete recovery.  .  
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