mirtazapine night sweats

Posted , 13 users are following.

a great tablet for helping with sleep but fairly chaotic sweating occurs in night sometimes  4 changes of nightware . I think this is a hushed up side effect of mirtazapine. would like to continue use but the sweating stuff is really abnormal and a bit scarey. stop taking it and the sweats stop...pretty conclusive don't you think.!!

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  • Posted

    I took 45mg for 13 years and it never give me night sweats, but I just stopped taking it last week and had them a tiny bit, just last night, actually. But there is no mirtazapine conspiracy. It's a wonderful drug that has helped millions of people. It has its side effects, sure, but it's much easier to tolerate than an SSRI like Paxil.

    Lots of of things can cause night sweats. Do you drink alcohol? One drink is like 3 drinks when you're taking mirtazapine. How's your blood pressure? Are you taking any other medications?

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    • Posted

      Dear Mud

      you said you took it for thirteen years and you stopped just last week?Please I really will like to know how you stopped or how you tempered?

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    • Posted

      Hi Charles!

      I literally just stopped. I did all the research, compared it to other cessations I've been through, read up on how mirtazapine works, and realized tapering wouldn't do me any good. So I just took a couple weeks off work, just in case, and stopped cold turkey. 

      Mirtazapine does work on receptors other than the ones that govern anxiety and depression, so there are side effects when you take it (tiredness from it's antihistamine qualities, for instance) and there are symtoms that arise when you stop taking it, but they are temporary. I've had an increase in anxiety, of course, the first 6 nights or so I didn't sleep as well, bowel movements are a bit looser, have had a few low-grade headaches—just typical discontinuation symptoms for mirtazpaine. There is no mirtazpaine withdrawal—withdrawal only happens with addictive substances like benzos or alcohol or heroin. Sure you don't feel great for a while, but that's not withdrawal. You don't build a tolerance to mirtazapine like those other drugs, so you cannot be addicted to it. I've been through benzo withdrawal, and believe me, that is HELL ON EARTH. You want to die. Quitting mirtazpaine was a walk in the park for me, compared to quitting Ativan. (Stopping benzos cold turkey can kill you. Benzo and alcohol withdrawal kills people all the time—but heroin withdrawal will kill you. Scary.)

      I think the problem is so many of us are depressed or suffer from debilitating anxiety, so we expect the worst ALL OF THE TIME. But our conditions are temporary. And the uncomfortable stuff we feel when we stop a drug like mirtazpaine is totally normal. If it's unbearable, that's usually because your underlying illness like depression or anxiety still has its hooks in you, and you still need medication. And there's nothing wrong with that.

      I have kept a Valium on me for years. I have one left from years ago that I always keep with me just in case. And that's enough to keep me from freaking out, usually. just knowing that it's there, just in case. But I didn't even have to take one when i stopped mirtazapine. I quit last Tuesday I'm doing quite well. I'm so happy that I think I'm finally past my GAD and PTSD. 

      I'm just tired of taking meds and being scared of everything all the time. I'm 45 years old and I've been on meds since 1999. I'm going to get traditional therapy and firugre out why I have anxiety. No more just taking pills to treat the symtoms instead of fixing the cause. That's just me. But there was a time that I really needed meds, and mirtazapine probably saved my life. It worked the first night I took it. I remember sleeping well for the first time in months and crying from happiness the next morning after 11 hours of glorious sleep!

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    • Posted

      Apologies for the spelling and grammatical erros, I typed that too quickly. I meant to say that heroin withdrawl won't kill you, but benzo and alcohol withdrawal will, which is pretty scary. Just because it's legal doesn't mean it's safe.
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    • Posted

      Hello Mud,

      I have read your story and when i am right you took Mirt for anxiety?

      You stopped it right away i read.

      They (dr) said it is not addictif but why are so many people tappering from Mirt then?

      I found  on the internet that Mirt must be tappered.

      I am realy curious how the next weeks will go for you, would you tel us that?

      I am on 15 mg of Mirt and when i stop i really will know what to do.

      Tappering is so difficult, the tiredness etc.

      I also have stopped drinking alcohol a year ago and i have drinking lots of it but is was easy to stop for me, do i think everyone is different.

      I hope you will tell us how it goes.

      Sorry for my English i am from Holland and it is difficult to tell what i meansmile

      I wish you well.

       

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    • Posted

      I will definitely keep you posted on my condition. I wish I had someone to tell me about these drugs when I first started taking them, but I started taking mirtazapine in the early 2000s, when it was still very new, and to this day it is still relatively unknown in the United States, where I live. All the doctors here push SSRIs, when in fact they have been shown to not be very effective. 

      I think I should probably start a new thread because I feel like I'm hijacking poor Drew's original question. Sorry Drew! I'll post something in a new topic asap.

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    • Posted

      I started a new discussion in the Mirtazapine group. It's called "My experiences with GAD and PTSD, Paxil, benzos, and quitting Mirtazapine cold-turkey."

       

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    • Posted

      Hello Mud,

      Yes i would also that had told someone about ssri and this one, so that i could make a choice what to do and now i know i had never take them.

      Yes i know, it is the same here, doctors also push ssri´s, i have tried 4 and i flew high as a kite, it did not going well, so i was put on Mirt.

      Also sorry for my interuption Drew, i will follow the topic of Mud on his topicsmile

      Nice that you will start a topic about  your condition, i am very curious how it will go.

      Thanks for your reply.

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    • Posted

      thanks Mud for your reply.  I did reply earlier but hit some moderator problem. i think i stated my age in my reply which breaks the rules. anyhow i do consume limited amounts of alcohol and that may well contribute to the night sweats so I am now on the wagon and see what happens
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    • Posted

      Ah, they probably have the age rules to help keep predators from targeting children. Makes sense.

      I found that if I abstained from alcohol for at least 4-5 days while taking mirtazapine, I felt a lot better. But I love wine and I'm a graphic designer for a wine bar so that was a problem. Because even one glass of wine while on mirtazapine would make my head spin, and before that I used to be able to drink 3-4 glasses over a few hours with friends at wine tastings and not be impaired at all.

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    • Posted

      I've been on 30mg for 3 month now and my sweats are unbearable.  I'm 60 and menopause should be over and done it's like having the menopause all over again.  I've just tapered it down to 15mg as from last night to see what happens.

       

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  • Posted

    Thanks for your reply. I took mirtazapine for the first time in 2015 as an alternative to prozac which didnt seem to hit the spot anymore. I took 15mg of mirt and liked the sleep effect. I phased mirt out but when I resumed I started with the heavy night sweating. I am 65. I do consume alcohol regularly alongside medication but not in large quantities. Perhaps that could be an important factor so I will stop the alcohol intake and see what happens.

    Sleep is very important to me  ( and everyone ). I have occassionally taken the sleeping tablet zopiclone which gives me 6-8 hours sleep but the disadvantage is that the following night, sleeping is difficult. This is where mirt comes into play for me as it assists sleeping and can be taken nightly as part of an antidepressant program. Zopiclone cannot be taken regularly due to the addictive nature of sleeping tablets

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    • Posted

      Night sweats can be a symptom of high blood pressure. Could that be a factor?

      I'm a red wine fanatic, and I found that I cloudn't have more than one glass of wine while taking mirtazapine without developing brain fog and feeling like I drank half a bottle. That's another reason why I wanted to stop mirtazpaine. Wine is one of life's great joys and it saddened me to know that I couldn't enjoy it like I used too.

      I did go weeks at a time withoutn alcohol, and I found that the brain fog improved after 4-5 days of abstinance. And I wasn't even drinking a lot, just the standard two 5oz glasses a night. 

      Last night a friend visited and we wound up polishing off a bottle of wine in a couple hours and I felt fine. I woke up great as well, whereas before while taking mirtazapine I would feel out of sorts for days after a night like that.

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