Monitoring my BP at home!

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Hi,

I have recently been diagnosed with high blood pressure and have decided to keep an eye on my bp at home,  We have a strong family history of stroke and I want to make sure I'm  doing everything I can to manage my blood pressure to reduce the risk a bit. I just wanted to know if anyone else monitors their bp at home? One of my friends said it makes her worse knowing she is checking it daily? Ive found a great little monitor that screens for afib at the same time on a homegp site, which i thought was brilliant as afib increases your risk of stroke too, by quite alot i think!

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6 Replies

  • Posted

    Hi I monitor my bp at home but only because my gp said she wanted a weeks worth of readings as mine rises with anxiety (caused we think by white coat syndrome) maybe you should as your doctor first so you know it's the best thing for you.

    Was it very high and over how long, what meds were you put on

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  • Posted

    Hi,

    I have used a home BP machine for many years, even before I knew I had a problem. There are several types, I have a wrist and also an arm type. I think the arm ones are rated better than the wrist because the position of the arm, when using the wrist type, makes a difference to the reading. Enter all your readings in a spreadsheet and calculate a running average of the last 20 readings. It is much easier to understand than trying to view many readings which bounce up and down wildly. Regards...

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  • Posted

    Hi saz. I know EXACTLY what you mean. My father died of a stroke some years ago and I was diagnosed with high bp shortly afterwards. I became obsessed with taking measurements several times a day! Crazy! I have now settled down to taking measurements on just two days a week.

    However, THE most important thing to control is your lifestyle. BP is greatly affected by peoples diet and exercise regime and weight. Are you aware of the danger factors? You haven't posted your latest bp readings. Are they very high? Also are you a smoker? Let us know and you will get lots of good ideas and support.

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  • Posted

    Hi Saz,  I have a cerebral aneurysm so need to keep a close eye on my BP. I take a cocktail of medications but also take my BP twice a day.  The arm type of monitor is recommended by my hypertension nurse as the wrist type is unreliable (I also get her to calibrate my monitor agaiinst hers).
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  • Posted

    I am 67+ and have been affected with hypertension for a few years now. Was initially diagnozed with Zestri 5mg once a day and it helped to keep the BP down. However, later on the BP started to slump to extyreme low levels and I was adviced to stop the Zestril. Having done so I sartd taking the medication if and only if my BP went up as I was monitoring the BP twice a day at home using a digital meter.

    Since of late my BP has been rather high, an average of about 180/100 based on readings taken twice a day. The highest I have reached so far is 210/110 on one particular morning.

    Not really sure how to manage this. My doctor has asked me to restart the Zestril on a daily basis.

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    • Posted

      If you can, seriously improve your lifestyle. Obviously exercise is a concern,a t these levels. But, if you start slowly, and in consoltation with your doctor, build things up, you could improve this number. 

      As for diet, you can go fairly quickly. Everything you eat should be a fresh, or lightly cooked plant, with fresh, unprocessed meat. Avoid any and all heavily processed foods, avoid anything without fibre, and with too many simple carbs and saturated fats.

      My dad went from BP of 160/90 in his early 70s down to 115/65 by his late 70s, following a strict exercise and dietary regime. Assuming no other pathological process, lifestyle will make a huge difference. But you must treat it very seriously. 

      My dad was a sick and dying man in his early 70s. He's now a pretty healthy 84 year old, with probably a decade of useful life left. He's actually healthier looking than he was in his 60s. But, he adheres to his diet of porridge, green veg, and fish perfectly, with no slip ups. He exercises every day, and avoids sitting for extende dperiods.

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