MRI results are in. I'm both relieved and worried

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Basically, the MRI said I have a small tear inside the labrum and they won't even try to fix that. The other thing is slight swelling of the bursa. The Dr said no surgery at this point and to rest my arm for two months. I am glad there is nothing major wrong, but not too sure my shoulder will feel better. I told him I would wait and see how it was in August. I'm frustrated because he doesn't want me to lift my arm and it's my dominant arm. How am I going to do my daily tasks? Enough grumbling. I will try to do as he says and go from there. He said if it is still bothering me they can remove the bursa. Not sure about that.

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  • Posted

    I understand why you are frustrated. I have a type II slap tear and I have loss of range, weakness and pain.  Ive been doing the physical therapy they said will help for 8 months with no improvement. I'm getting another MRI with dye this time. Go back after the PT and tell them of any problems you are still having. I don't understand why they won't fix my slap tear either! I've seen lots of people have the surgery...ugh!!!

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    • Posted

      Hi Victoria,

      I've been following your progress. I'm in the same situation with a torn labrum that they don't want to fix and bursitis. 

      Rest and ice is the only thing that helps me. But it only helps if I don't use my arm.

      I had a MRI with contrast dye and I am waiting to see what the doctor will do. 

      Let me know how your progress goes and we can compare notes.

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  • Posted

    Ask the Dr for a referral to pt! Find a good pt. Ask around. Slow and steady wins the shoulder race. Hang in there!
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    • Posted

      I have been to PT and continue some of the exercises still. The PT helped some of my muscles but did not improve my ROM at all. The pain I started with was still there with no improvement. Resting it seems to be helping some. I am 2 weeks into resting and it is slightly better. 
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  • Posted

    HI Victoria,

    Your surgeon is correct to suggest ice, rest and take pain medicine at the moment. The swelling in your bursa is most likely the one that is causing you MOST of the pain at the moment. If the pain is not subsiding after two weeks, talk to your doctor about cortisone injection. Request a referral to a physical therapist as well. Physical therapy is beneficial not only to reduce the pain, improve stability and strength on the shoulder but to improve shoulder proprioception needed to reduce shoulder injury further and prepare your shoulder is the case you need surgery in the future.  PT has many tools in his arsenal to help you. The shoulder is complex joint composed of 5 small joints working together in harmony. Any deficits in these small joints result in compensatory movements which causes pain. To this date, the biomechanics of the shoulder is still not yet fully understood, and surgery ended up altering such biomechanics. This is because the shoulder joint is not only complicated but varies from people to people. I believe this is one of the leading reason for the high rate of residual pains years after surgery. Your posture will be evaluated for possible muscle imbalance. They can also help you with pain and other movement strategies to preserve your joint or reduce stress to the shoulder when using it.  PTs are very knowledgeable when it comes to biomechanics (kinesiology) of the body. Ask him questions about shoulder mobility, scapulohumeral rhythm, actions of the rotator cuff muscles, stabilizing muscles of the shoulder complex, joint proprioceptions, pain management and recovery patterns with and without surgery. They are an excellent source of information to prepare you ahead in case you decided to go through the surgery. Shoulder surgery is painful and often has a high failure rate. Most research would tell you 25% surgeries ended up with residual pain years after surgery with some studies saying as high as 35%. This means, at least 1 out of 4 operations in the shoulder will end up with chronic pains. This is most likely the reason why your doctor would not recommend you to have surgery at the moment. Always remember that operation is your last resort.I wish you well and hopefully; your shoulder improves without surgery.Disclosure: I am a physical therapist and recently decided to have right shoulder surgery after years of rotator cuff pathology.

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    • Posted

      I have had both PT and the injection. Neither of these has helped my ROM, but the resting my arm seems to have helped a little. It seems to be a day to day thing. Some days are better than others. I will wait the full 2 months and see how I am doing. The main reason I'd have the surgery is to alleviate the pain but will look in to how effective it will be and the failure rate.  Thank you.

       

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