My Rezum Story -- Critical: ALL men should learn to self cath (CIC

Posted , 18 users are following.

So I finally had a procedure, the Rezum.

I found an excellent doctor in Chicago at Northwestern. He does both Urolift and Rezum. His name is Dr. Matias Hofer, if anyone's interested. He is also familiar with the NW doctors doing PAE. While he's my fourth Urologist, he is the FIRST one to do the cytoscopy that actually told us what the problem is. As suspected, a median lobe obstruction. My prostate is only 49 cc so he said PAE doesn't work well for that size. Because it was median lobe, he said he didn't think Urolift would work.

He said a Rezum would get good results and I agreed going forward. Just days before the procedure, I began to stop urinating normally at all for about a week so THANK GOD and the MEN ON THIS BOARD, who previously coached me through learning Self-CIC. This Uro also had no issue with prescribing catheters unlike my prior Uros.

Also, critically, he would have normally post-Rezum inserted a Foley Catheter but I asked since I was already self-cathing could I just continue to do that? He thought about it for a few seconds and said sure. So I am now recovering at home, self-cathing without having to have an uncomfortable Foley inserted.

I honestly believe every man on this board, if you're having symptoms, should learn to self-cath as an insurance policy. It may save you a trip to the ER and may prevent a Foley after whatever procedure you do have.

Back to the Rezum. I was having it done under a local. It was incredibly painful. Fortunately, it didn't last long. After I was in a lot of pain and discomfort. Mostly, a HUGE burning desire to pee despite a totally empty bladder. This pain gradually got better after an hour or two. I took the opiods and stayed on pain meds that first day. My procedure was at 2 p.m.

The next day I woke and cathed and felt 100% better. The pain is gone. I'm peeing very little naturally but I feel great. The urgency is gone. I'm self-cathing 3-4 times a day.

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  • Posted

    Thanks for the update. I completely agree with your strong recommendation for everyone who is suffering from BPH to learn to self catheterize. Several of the current surgical procedures cause swelling of the prostate and self cathing after the procedure avoids the discomfort of a Foley catheter and allows us to get back to a more normal life more quickly.

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    • Posted

      I was moderated so here we have:

      Intermittent catheterization (IC) i not without various risks, google and you will see:

      Complications - Intermittent Catheters

      Urethral Adverse Events | Scrotal Complications | Bladder-related Complications | Pain | Urinary Tract Infections | Causes of IC-related UTIs | Video Lecture | References

      Intermittent catheterization (IC) is the preferred procedure for people with incomplete bladder emptying not satisfactorily managed by other methods. Complications and adverse events can arise in both men and women but are seen especially in male patients performing intermittent self-catheterization long-term. Here are some major ones

      -Urethral, Scrotal, Bladder-related Complications

      -Urethral Adverse Events

      -Scrotal Complications

      -Bladder-related Complications

      -Pain

      -Urinary Tract Infections

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    • Posted

      Thank you Andrew, for your fair and straight forward presentation.

      To keep balance in the conversation, I will mention that NOT doing CIC can have an extremely high likelihood of results with much more serious "Complications". Here are some of the major ones:

      -Emergency Room Visits (or death from AUR / TUR)

      -Extreme Pain

      -Urethral, Scrotal, Bladder-related Complications

      -Urethral Adverse Events

      -Scrotal Complications

      -Bladder-related Complications

      -Long term Pain and Discomfort from internal damage(s)

      -Urinary Tract Infections

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  • Posted

    Thanks for your encouraging guys to self cath. I had a Rezum 4 weeks ago and it was low on pain but I had been given nitrous oxide so if the pain increased I breathed in more gas. Anyway, I was given a foley cather and every time it was taken out I had to go back to the Uro for another one because I just could not pee.

    3 1/2 weeks later I talked my Dr into letting me self cath and I 'm doing well with it, only cathing twice a day with very little retention and none of the limitations of a Foley. The Foley, I believe, slowed down the healing process. I'm on the mend, peeing better every day.

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  • Posted

    I also agree (and have told several of my friends) - if you have had urinary issues, learn to do CIC, it isn't that big of a deal. Even though I had FLA almost 2 years ago and fortunately no longer have any problems, I will still carry some small flexible catheters when I travel any long distance, especially an international air flight. As of yet, never had to use it - but it's nice to know I have it and how to use it, if the need arises.

    Good luck with your recovery. Rezum had recently been approved before I had FLA and I gave it serious consideration. Sounds like you received good advice on the PAE and Urolift, both of which I investigated as well and ruled out for similar (and additional) reasons.

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  • Posted

    Motto,

    We are all different. I know how to self cath, and have done it in the past a few times with great pain and difficulty. Before my recent bipolar TURP I tried again, but was completely unable to complete the cath. Pain was off the scale despite using a hydrophillic 14fr very high quality catheter. I will never do this again unless I am on strong pain meds. My urethral lining is very sensitive. This is not an option for me.

    Tom

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    • Posted

      Tom, I sent a reply with the website of Cure Medical. So it may not make it through the site Moderators. Here's the Post without the link. Chuck

      .

      .

      Tom,

      I am like you. My urethral lining is very sensitive and I suffered a lot trying to use the 14 fr the URO recommended, and only a little with the 12 fr. However, when I tried the Cure 10 fr (model M10 Ultra) I discovered it was so much easier and less painful. And then I tried the 8 fr model M8 Ultra from Cure Medical, and found they worked very well. I even tried the 6 fr That was Super easy and no pain or friction at all going in when I used Water based personal lubricant. The only thing I did notice with the 6 fr is it is hard to find (found the Peco brand), and the 6 fr although easy to insert took about 15 seconds longer to void than did the 8 fr . The 10 fr was Super Fast at voiding . Cure Medical will send out FREE samples.

      YMMV

      Good Luck Brother,

      Chuck

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    • Posted

      I think if it hurts to do it you're doing it wrong? but I'm no expert. but I did find the smaller the catheter the more comfortable that it was. The problem was the smaller catheters were to whippy or flexible to make it through to the bladder so I ended up using a 12 but at 10 was more comfortable.

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    • Posted

      I agree with Chuck, Cure catheters are the most comfortable. After 3 years of not so successful catherization with Speedicath, I almost gave up CIC, until someone recommended Cure. Give it a try, use smaller size to begin with.

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    • Posted

      I appreciate so many here who have offered helpful suggestions, but, I am now three months post TURP and my urine flow is fine, so, hopefully, I will never have to self cath again, ever. I have never used anything smaller than 14fr, so if something happens to me in the future and I absolutely have to cath I will send for samples of the smaller diameter ones as an experiment. Pre TURP my flow was almost completely cut off and I tried to cath, but only made it one inch in before the pain was just too much.

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    • Posted

      Reading this I wanted to add a point: I have been self cathing for almost 5 years , without any pain at all. For me what really helps is using a coude tip. Coloplast speedicath comes in Coude or regular. Coude means elbow in french, and it has a little curve at the end which helps in negotiating a particular spot in the urethra. IMPORTANT: you have to have the coude oriented properly, otherwise it can dig into the wall of the urethra, like the standard does sometime. To orient it properly , when you are holding the funnel end, you make sure the ridge on the funnel is pointing at your abdomen. .other catheters have a green stripe, which must be oriented towards your abdomen too. I once used an unfamiliar coude type, and oriented the little curve wrong, and it hurt like the dickens. So those of you who experience pain, have you tried a coude, knowing how to orient it?

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    • Posted

      One More point : the best CIC catheter in many peoples' opinion is the Coloplast Speedicath (,Coude or not ) what is great about it is that has a super slippery finish on it "hydrophilic" which does not generate any friction when you insert it. And if the coude model works best for you, make sure you use it correctly.

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    • Posted

      Mike,

      My first attempt to self cath about 5 years ago was with a coude tip - just a terrible experience. I was finally able to complete a cath with a straight tip, but it was another terrible experience. The coude tip was much more painful and difficult than the straight tip.

      I had prostate swelling after radiation for prostate cancer in 2014 and the swelling lasted for 6 weeks. During most of that time I had several Foley catheters until I could go on my own, but between week 5 and 6 no Foley and that's when I tried to self cath. I had no choice. I was able to do it a few times, but with great difficulty. Then, recently, before my TURP operation, I tried again - total failure and horrible pain. I will never do this again. My urethral lining is obviously very sensitive. I would need heavy pain medication to complete a self cath. Why bother? My TURP worked and I can pee now and empty my bladder. There are many here who are doing self cath to avoid having an operative procedure for various reasons. My bipolar TURP and three days on a Foley was really quite easy. After the Foley came out I could pee on my own, so no need for any self cath after that.

      Tom

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    • Posted

      Not true ! Hydrophilic Coloplast catheters are the worst for beginners, especially the coude. They are too stiff, and can easily cause urethra injuries and damage. So many people, including myself, suffered from them because of their heavily promotions on this forum, disguised as members recommendation.

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    • Posted

      I'm I'm using the Coloolast straight tip. I'm having it's okay.

      II would prefer a soft to have but none of them seem to be self lubricated. then the idea of adding lubrication well keeping everything sterile to me just seems to make it harder. is there a hydrophilic or self-contained soft tipped catheter that comes pre lubed?

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    • Posted

      Motto,

      All the Cure Ultra models are pre-lubed and soft/flexible. However, more importantly... they come with an easily used attachment piece that allows you to use the cath in a very Sterile manner for easier/cleaner insertion. Cure medical gives Free samples. I prefer the Ultra M8 model in 8 fr. You can get them in every size from 8 fr up to 16 fr

      I know Baird and Coloplast have the attachment variety as well. But they are too stiff and the eyelets are NOT "smoothed" as Cure medical's are. So upon withdrawing the catheter, those cath's without the smooth eyelets tend to grab tissue, which can hurt and cause pain.

      Chuck

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    • Posted

      IMHO, Cure hydrophilic with a water packet is the most comfortable. Cure Ultra comes prelubed but with a gel that irritated my urethra a bit.

      However, if you don't have problems like pain or bleeding with Coloplast then I'd stick with it. You're luckier

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