Nails and COPD

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Somewhere there was a discussion where people thought concave or curving nails where one of the symptoms of COPD. I personally didn't think this was the case and thought people should check in with their doc about it, to be sure there was nothing else underlying that could be the cause.

Quite by chance I came upon this information today and thought to share it (note the bold type reference to spoon shaped and concave nails):

Brittle nails or splitting of the nail bed from the nail plate can also be induced by several major systemic disease states. This includes kidney diseases that cause a buildup of nitrogen waste products in the blood and liver diseases such as chronic liver failure. Nails may also become brittle due to changes that occur during pregnancy, or they may be associated with endocrine disorders such as hypoparathyroidism, thyroid disorders, gout, and diabetes mellitus. [b:5d9761feba]Spoon-shaped nails (koilonychia) are associated with many disease states-specifically iron-deficiency anemia, trauma, Raynaud's disease, syphilis, diabetes, or hemochromatosis-or it may be a normal, inherited condition. These nails become thin and concave with raised edges and are often brittle. [/b:5d9761feba]

this from pharmacy times web.

Happy global COPD

V

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  • Posted

    Is this a joke? Because I don't get the punch line. :?: :?: :?:

    Maryann

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  • Posted

    [quote:012dbccad8=\"Anonymous\"]Is this a joke? Because I don't get the punch line. :?: :?: :?:

    Maryann[/quote:012dbccad8]

    Hi Maryann

    Its not a joke. Belief it or not there really was a discussion indicating people thought that the nail disorder could be connected to COPD.

    V

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  • Posted

    So, are we now to ignore all medical texts, Doctors etc. that attribute downward curling fingernails to lung disease in general, and low oxygen levels in particular, in favour of the word of 'v'?. I am sure we would all love to know your credentials! '.
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  • Posted

    [quote:3cca77b3fa=\"another visitor \"]So, are we now to ignore all medical texts, Doctors etc. that attribute downward curling fingernails to lung disease in general, and low oxygen levels in particular, in favour of the word of 'v'?. I am sure we would all love to know your credentials! '.[/quote:3cca77b3fa]

    That's entirely up to you Van - as is checking with your doc to make sure it is not any other underlying condition.

    Just trying to help. Would hate to think anyone would put their own health at risk by just putting everything down to COPD.

    Of course if a doc or professional medical advise is sought often a patient is sent for tests, blood, urine etc to eliminate any other cause, other than COPD.

    It makes good sense to do this, don't you agree?

    Please don't feel you have to favour the word of 'V', I'm just sharing my personal opinion and experiences as you are also doing.

    Have a good day Van

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  • Posted

    Finger nail growth [b:a1338fff9a]can[/b:a1338fff9a] indicate any number of health conditions. In addition .....

    Downward curved nail ends [b:a1338fff9a]may[/b:a1338fff9a] denote heart, liver, or respiratory problem as mentioned in the 'Little Things' thread relating to the previous discussion on this subject.

    Have a great day peeps.

    V

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  • Posted

    [quote:5b027b8aeb=\"Visitor \"][quote:5b027b8aeb=\"Anonymous\"]Is this a joke? Because I don't get the punch line. :?: :?: :?:

    Maryann[/quote:5b027b8aeb]

    Its not a joke. Belief it or not there really was a discussion indicating people thought that the nail disorder could be connected to COPD.

    V[/quote:5b027b8aeb]

    I saw vanessa's post last summer and did not connect - but now my mum has the same thing with her nails. They grow very fast but curl down onto the top of her finger instead of growing straight. I asked her respiratry nurse and she says it is probably because of the copd and oxygen because this can cause it and she has heard about it a lot. My friend does nails and she says the ridges can mean osteoporosis or just getting older.

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  • Posted

    Sorry, forgot to add my name to the above

    Suzie

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  • Posted

    Hi Suzie

    I believe medications and diet deficiencies can interfere with nail and hair growth too.

    I was concerned that people didn't automatically assume nail irregularity is because of COPD and felt it very important that people experiencing irregularities consultant with their doctor to be sure it is not any other underlying health problem.

    As previously mentioned I believe it is recommended that because:

    \"Nail changes may signify a number of disorders elsewhere in the body. These changes may indicate illness before any other symptoms do\"

    and that \"it is recommended that medical attention be sought about any nail irregularities\".

    Wishing all the very best.

    V

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  • Posted

    Hi All,

    I think that we should never take anything for granted and any physical changes should be checked by a Medical Doctor to rule out any other underlying problems that may exist. The danger for me is that I can blame COPD for all my aches and pains and not consult a Doctor when I should.

    Regards,

    Robert.

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  • Posted

    Hi Robert

    I know what you mean, I was blaming my heart prob on the COPD, its exactly the same symptoms, breathlessness and tight pain in chest on exertion, it wasn't until I started getting the palpitations that I thought I should get it checked. But honestly I did think all symptoms were down to the COPD until that started.

    Keep warm all and breathe good.

    V

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  • Posted

    I know that the original posters on this topic were from quite some time ago, yet if anyone new encounters this site and reads regarding nail manifestations and symptoms, I have to agree with the poster who came across research and evidence which linked nail abnormalities and other systemic disease...it IS indeed true, and horizontal nail ridges in toes, fingernails, concave, curved, split, peeling from the ends, all have links to a condition, as was listed, of hemochromatosis, which is a genetic disorder that affects iron storage in the body.

    As one poster questioned, is this a joke?...sorry, no. Punch line is, that the longer you have undetected iron deposits in your body the more damage it does, and this condition has outward manifestations like skin, nails, eyes, and leads to other systemic disease such as diabetes, cancer, liver cirrhosis, heart failure, thyroid issues and many more. You can look it up for yourselves...damage done from excess iron is extensive and life-threatening due to results of organ damage, joint, and tissue damage. Usually people are only diagnosed in end stages, when more serious health problems arise, but if dr.s more tuned in to earlier warning signs, early prevention of other disease can be initiated.

    My husband was just diagnosed last month...I too have high iron and levels of saturation are too high, I just found out and I have nail deformites on hands and toes, other people report blueish nails or horizontal blue lines as well as ridges, vertical and horizontal. Psoriatic nails such as this are found in people with psoriasis, and psoriasis is linked to people who have been found to have iron overload disease.

    Really excellent research available on all types of complications/disorders/disease commonly known to people yet root cause is iron deposition in organs, tissues, and joints.

    Take care

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  • Posted

    Never said about this when I got copd tested was the nails how the doctor found the lungs bad in you or husband.

    The waterman one still writes stuff but not any others in a year looking back for stuff about bad chest.

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  • Posted

    HI there, were you wondering about chest problems, or lungs? Not quite sure what symptoms you are refering to, but with iron overload early warning signs are often missed, and excess iron affects the liver, heart, pancreas, brain, causing all sorts of issues that the dr diagnose as something else. The reason the nail thing caught my eye is that this could be also a sign found in people with iron overload. Multiple organs are affected, tissues, and joints. Auto-immune disorders result, liver damage, congestive heart failure is common, diabetes due to cirrhosis and pancreatic damage, and there are many others.

    "Advanced COPD can lead to complications beyond the lungs, such as weight loss (cachexia), pulmonary hypertension and right-sided heart failure (cor pulmonale). Osteoporosis, heart disease, muscle wasting and depression are all more common in people with COPD.[4]" Quoted from Wiki

    Common among people with iron overload are the above mentioned complications. My husband has had much problem through life with bronchitis. I have many sinus infections that come and go, stuffed nose, coughing, sometimes dry sometimes with phlegm, tightness in chest, burning lungs, heart palipitations and irregular heart beat, shortness of breath and feeling of faintness, profuse sweating during an episode of not being able to breath or get enough breath or oxygen...

    We now understand all the realtionships there are between iron storage in the body and failure of body's systems and organs to function properly. Blood flow is one important complication and blood vessels blockages and damage in legs and other parts of the body.

    In fact, Dr. Zamboni had found the research on iron and how it damages blood vessels in legs restricting the blood flow and making blockages, and so because his wife was debilatated with MS he decided to look into the blood vessels going to her brain and indeed they were blocked, preventing the blood flowing out of the brain to drain properly, creating deposits of iron on her brain. He did an operation and unblocked her arteries, restored blood flow and cured her MS. Even her lesions on her brain disappeared and for over 3 years she has not had any more MS attacks. Other patients he has done this on have experienced amazing results. Iron is a major corrupting influence in our bodies when we store too much. And everything we eat and take in has iron, and so much food we have is fortified and enriched, so we are putting in and not putting out if our bodies are programmed to store iron. It is very common, but drs are slow to recognize early signs and symptoms or dagnose people with other more common ailments like fibromyalgia, and osteo arthritis, IBS...

    I could go on forever, but if you are ken to find out look up on irondisorders.org or ironoverload.org and get so much more info than I can explain.

    Cheers.

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  • Posted

    Can nails be used to diagnose hypochondria it would certainly appear that is the case with self diagnosis being based on perceived threats. Be careful what you read lest you die of a miss-spelling.
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  • Posted

    I think that the original post and discussion referred to nail curling as a possible sign of low oxygen levels in the blood due to having C.O.P.D. Quote from Mayo Clinic - ''Clubbing of your nails — when your nails curve much more than usual — is often a sign of low oxygen levels in the blood and may be related to lung disease.'' Low oxygen levels as a result of having C.O.P.D. can be easily checked by your Doctor or Chest Consultant, if you are concerned, by using an Oximeter. C.O.P.D. is usually diagnosed by your Doctor or Chest Consultant, if you have one, by using a Spirometer. Hypochondria is usually diagnosed by your Doctor as well lol.

    Regards,

    Robert

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