New and confused

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A week ago my doctor told my my thyroid was low. I've known this for almost 20 years, I have virtually every symptom of hypothyroidism, but the labs never showed it until now. I feel relieved and vindicated and completely paralyzed. I have a prescription for Levothyroxine but I haven't started it yet. I'm scared to be treated by the doctors who have been wrong for 20 years. I know the tests are inaccurate. How will I know if this is working? I've been achy and tired my whole life. I've researched as much as I can, there are so many options for treatment. I've gotten the name of a good Endocrinologist and I'm waiting for an appointment. What stops me from starting the medicine is what if I need more testing, what if there is valuable information we could only get now, before I start the medicine? Part of this feels like once this starts there is no going back. Should I wait for more testing and possibly better treatment options? Or is it time to jump in?

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  • Posted

    Hi Aim, you e been suffering for decades, yet you feel hesitant. Trust your gut. The meds are not all that and a bag of chips, as they say.

    I, like you, suffered for decades with thyroid disease that didn't show in bloodwork. For me however, I had a neon sign pointing at my thyroid, in the form of a very large cyst. No denying the thyroid disease with a giant cyst, no matter what the blood tests say, right?

    Well, eventually I got so bad that I resorted to meds. Started with NDTs, then levothyroxin in several different forms... Then a bovine glandular OTC. The natural meds worked enough so I could function a bit better. The levo was horrible and caused more side effects, and didn't relieve the hypothyroid symptoms for the most part. I couldn't get the dosage stable for any of the meds.

    After years on the meds and becoming more I'll from them, I concluded that the meds only work for certain profiles, of which most people don't fall into. And, the synthetic meds are little more than a placebo with side effects, that shifts bloodwork. 

    After much research, I concluded that the cause of my hypothyroidism is chemical exposure and heavy metal toxicity (bromine and mercury). I found amino acid therapy to be more effective than any of the meds. There is a biochemical rationale for the effectiveness of amino acid therapy. Once I got my head together enough to  think, the amino acids were the obvious solution to try after so many failures and partial successes. Voila! Amino acids work! 

    There are dietary and lifestyle changes you can make to help heal your thyroid naturally. These are things that are not mainstream because there is no profit to be made. Many folks on this site have had varying levels of success with holistic approaches.  Cleansing the toxicity is super important, along with diet and nutrition. I've also found TCM to be extremely helpful. 

    I'm happy to share details if you're interested.

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    • Posted

      Dave, YES, the amino acids are more effective for thyroid than any medication (I've tried like 8 different meds). The amino acid therapy is great! I did high doses of essential among acids for a couple months, then tapered off to as needed. Still somewhat hypo, but my hair finally started growing back, and I feel better than is did on any of the meds. Minimal side effects, just watch the kidneys.

       

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    • Posted

      Hi Dave, I PMed you. Keep in mind that when I tried the aminos, I was out of other options. I knew that if I got the dose wrong, and it wasn't hi enough to be effective that I'd likely crash and burn worse than ever. 

      I tried a normal dose firts to make sure I didn't have a bad reaction, then upped it to what I felt would be sufficiently high to be effective. As with treating any deficiency, you have to supplement with much higher doses to get levels back to normal quickly.

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  • Posted

    Many people do very well on the medication, but those are the people one doesn't often hear from here. Learn about the normal levels, TSH for example, and find out what yours are. You might spend years trying all sorts of alternative therapies and get nowhere, frankly. So I would get going on the medication because it's unlikely to make you feel any worse, or, if you prefer to see an endocrinologist first, wait and see what they have to say.

    The amino acids sound interesting.

    if you have had the symptoms for twenty years it seems unlikely that dietary changes will be much help.

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    • Posted

      I disagree. I've probably had thyroid disease for over 15 years, or maybe longer and have still not resorted to taking any prescription medications for it. Diet can play a huge part in regulating an unruly thyroid.

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    • Posted

      Yeah, I know a lot of people personally who take and have taken thyroid medication. The only ones who find the levothyroxin effective are those who were 1) diagnosed by blood test, 2) a symptomatic, 3) have no other health problems and are completely healthy, 3) are very athletic, 4) are on a very low dose of medication. So basically, it changes blood work, but these people don't really notice any other differences.

      For people who have a serious thyroid problem, these meds are a waste of time.

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    • Posted

      I do great on levo.  My dose is at 100mcg, which is not low with my 5'6", 119 pound frame. I also have have "serious thyroid issues".  I have almost nop thyroid left, except for a little chunk of hard scarred tissue, via untrasound.  I also have been diagnosed with other health issues, lupus, IBS, amemia, social anxiety, and the doctors also suspect other autoimmune conditions.  I am not athletic either.  I guess I just don't blame every little thing that goes on with my body, mentally or physically, on my thyroid.  Anyway, I definitely agree with you, that levothyroxine is not a good treatment for everyone, I just wanted to point out that there are people on higher doses with more severe thyroid disease, that it does work great for.   That's all... I guess it really does just depend on the person.  What may work for one, may not work for another. 

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