Newly diagnosed with AF

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Hello,

Early last month I had pneumonia and during my time in hospital I was diagnosed with AF.

I had never heard of it before and I was very shocked.    The doctor said I may have had it for years but not known.   I have to say that for years I have often been breathless and get tired easily.    The doctor put me on apixaban and I hate the thought of taking tablets for the rest of my life.   I am 73,  I am a healthy weight, I exercise daily and before contracting pneumonia I have rarely been ill.    I had a follow up appointment with the doctor a couple of weeks ago and I am told my  pulse is rapid thought my blood pressure is a bit low.    I have now been given bisoloprolol and I am told that my pulse though still irregular is lower.   Only now am I reading that people have episodes of AF but I am not sure what that means and I think my AF is probably constant if that makes sense.    I am trying to learn to live with all this,  I am not sure whether or not I am glad I found out there was a problem.   I suppose at least now I am on tablets it helps avoid a stroke,  such a terrifying thought.   I often feel so exhausted, especially in the evenings and it takes me ages to climb upstairs now.   I don`t know whether this is because I had pneumonia, or because of either of the tablets I take.   It can`t be because of AF because surely that didn`t start suddenly when I was in hospital.    I wonder if I could not take the bisoloprolol as I think that makes you tired.

Not sure what to think.

I have an appointment with the cardiologist early in June but I feel the doctors don`t have time to answer all our questions.    I sometimes wonder if I have AF because of something I did.   Is it my fault?    Sorry for the long post.   I would appreciate anyone`s comments or advice.   Thanks.

Kathleen

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14 Replies

  • Posted

    I was 58 and fit until the day they put me om Bisoprolol, that day I turned into an old man overnight and I never recovered.
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    • Posted

      Hello Peter,

      Thank you for your reply.   I have read that if Bisoprolol doesn`t suit you then there is something else you can try.   I am wondering if you have asked the doctor about it.

      Kathleen

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  • Posted

    I'm on bisoprolol I'm 36 so far no problems been on bout 6 months. I don't have afib but sister in law who is 44 has it. She's on thinners too but might be able to come off. I think you will be ok. Be positive. You are still young.

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    • Posted

      Hello Samantha,

      This is all new to me and I am learning as I go along!    Thank you for your reply.  

      Kind regards,

      Kathleen

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  • Posted

    I would not stop your bisoporol, especially not without cardiologists advice, as I understand it, it stops your heart from forming scar tissue after damage.  

    Husband has heart failure and has been on bisporol for 7 years now, works very well for him, but I do know that for others it is a nightmare, its just a matter of working out what medication suits you best.

    ​I too would wonder if the puenomonia was the cause it certainly would contribute to breathlessness even after you have got though the worst of the virus, your lungs do heal up, but not in a couple of weeks.

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  • Posted

    Resting you heart therefore slower heartbeat, is part of the treatment for heart issues, if you strained a muscle in you leg you would be advised to put your leg up and rest, not to walk around too much on it, little harder with the heart to do that, therefore slowing down your heartbeat, so it is not working so hard, but side effects would be breathlessness, especially when trying to do things as usual.

    Try to be a little more aware, move a little slower, but don't stop moving about, monitor your level of breathlessness, that is your warning to slow down, you should be able to keep up a normal conversation without gasping for air.

    ?All advice husband was given with his heart issues, he knows to stop and take a break if necessary, but stopping completely is not an option for him, he walks kilometers a day much to the specialists amazement, but does take breaks along the way, bus stops are a wonderful sit down place to just stop for a few minutes until he starts to feel better again. 

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    • Posted

      Hello Lyn,

      Thank you for taking the time to reply and for the information you have given me.   I have read it several times and will try to take your excellent advice.

      Kind regards,

      Kathleen

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  • Posted

    you have to see your cardilogist every month  and have pt blood test

    no stress no heavy exercise

    and medicens regullary for the rest of your life

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    • Posted

      Hello Kamyar,

      I don`t know what a `pt` blood test is.    It all sounds a bit depressing taking tablets for the rest of my life but it will be worth it to feel well.

      Kind regards,

      Kathleen

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  • Posted

    hi dear 

    pt blood test shows the time  for blood clot

    they give you some drug like varfarin to make clot time longer and dilute your blood

    it is should be done for hear in af

    when both sides are this pump dont work  as they are supposed to

    and lowering your heart beat by betablockers

    to prevent air bulb goes up in your wanes and prevent possible stroke

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  • Posted

    Firstly, atrial fibrillation is not all that uncommon once you hit the age of 60, it can have different causes, but most of the time it is just a byproduct of an aging heart

    muscle. They like to determine if it's paroxysmal, or sustained, because there are

    different treatment modalities for both.  I was first diagnosed at age 43 and was put on warfarin, because they wanted to prevent a stroke at all costs, I was also

    put on Digoxin, it kept any more episodes at bay for close to 18 years ( I was taken off of dig 3 years ago and I've had episodes ever since) but obviously it was

    a mistake to take me off that med.  I will most likely end up back on it very soon.

    My a fib is a result of a congenital heart defect that went unnoticed for too long and I'm not a candidate now for operation because of my age (64) and the increased risk for mortality.  I live as best a life I can, eat healthy, keep my salt use to a minimum to prevent worsening heart failure.  I suggest you ask plenty of questions of your specialist when June rolls around.  You need answers for peace of mind, if nothing else.  Good luck to you.

     

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    • Posted

      Hello Scotgal,

      Thanks for your reply.    Good to know you are taking care of yourself and making the best of your life.   Good advice you have given me,  thank you.

      Kind regards,

      Kathleen

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