Nocturia - why is so much urine created at night?

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I just had Rezum last Friday and am wearing a Foley catheter. I was given a big urine bag to use at night. I've been noticing in the morning that the amount of urine is around 1500ml. It's no wonder I wake up to pee at night 2 - 3 times. To me, it seems prostate issues are not the only reason for this. I know cutting back on liquids at night is supposed to help, which I try to do, but this is a lot of urine. Any ideas on how to not produce so much urine at night? (just quit drinking during the day?)

Tim

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12 Replies

  • Posted

    Tim

    Hope everything works out for you. You also have to watch your salt intake..

    Good luck Ken

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  • Posted

    Tim:

    Check out a recent thread (about a week or less old) on compression socks. They've reduced my nighttime urine production by 33 to 40%.

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  • Posted

    I had a foley catheter before and after my greenlight surgery. I tried to cut back on how much I drank in the evening and I still had 1400 to 1500 ml in the morning in the bag. After it was removed it seemed I didn't urinate as much in the morning. Can't figure out why the difference.

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  • Posted

    .I think when you don't have a bag on and your bladder distended at night it sends a signal to the kidneys to slow down production of urine. when your bladder is not distended the kidneys produce more urine output.

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  • Posted

    Reduce late in the day your diuretics (eg coffee and alcohol)

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  • Posted

    As my doc explained it to me, when you are in a prone position as in sleeping, the bodily fluids have an easier time circulating through the kidneys and on to the bladder. Maybe think of it as a thoroughfare after rush hour. Traffic thins and you are flying from a to b much faster. Ditto fluids and ultimately urine through the pipeline.

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  • Posted

    1. Wear compression socks every day (but not while sleeping.)
    2. If on bp meds (or any meds that may have a diuretic side effect) ask your doc if you can take them in the morning 'sted of evening.
    3. Reduce fluids -- preferably none at all after 7 pm assuming a bedtime at 9 or after
    4. Avoid coffee, cola drinks and chocolate -- the caffeine in each irritates the bladder. Some say citrus needs to be on that list as well.

    These four have made a significant difference for me. I am a spry 72 and have/had been afflicted by overnight urinary frequency of every two hours. Now, if I follow the steps above with discipline, I am down to 1 to 2 times in an 8 hour overnight.

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    • Posted

      Hi Jerry:

      My understanding is that during the daytime, fluid builds up (is retained) and is effectively stored in the legs (for some it shows up as swelling, but that isn't true in my case). Without compression socks, once you lie horizontally (while sleeping), it is easier for that fluid to "flow" to the kidneys and be filtered/processed into urine. If you wear the compression socks during the daytime, the fluid doesn't build up as easily in the legs hence there isn't as much "stored" there to be processed at night. However, wearing compression socks during the daytime should result in a person urinating more liquid during the daytime. Compression socks don't change the total amount urinated during a 24 hour period, just how that amount is distributed (more urine during the daytime and less while sleeping).

      It's also recommended during the daytime to elevate your legs periodically. However, I have found that this produces no significant difference for me; perhaps, because I can't do it for a long enough time.

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