Obesity as a cause of AF.

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My cardiologist believes obesity and alcohol are the main causes of AF. I have cut back a great deal on alcohol, but due to knee surgery and arthritis have found it impossible to do any weightbearing exercise. Has anyone lost weight and found their af greatly reduced or basically stopped?

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  • Posted

    Well I have PAF and I haven't drunk for 15 years and I weigh 12 stone so I think that's a bit of and off statement! I've never weighed more than 12 stone and when I stopped drinking I didn't have AF.

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  • Posted

    Hmm. My cardio implicates weight (not necessarily obesity). My alcohol intake is moderate (10-12 units a week) because of arthritis meds. I weigh about 85 kg (13.5 stone), and have lost a couple of kg over the last few months. And my AF bouts are less frequent than they were - which may or may not be down to loss of weight. I do walk a fair bit, but no other deliberate exercise.

    Perhaps the arthritis (mine is rheumatoid) contributes to the AF? confused

    Alan

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  • Posted

    I didn't/couldn't drink  alcohol for years before I had AF but I am overweight.   Common sense with weight and food and drink and smoking, diet  and everything will help your body I guess however I've not noted that anyone who is the perfect model of all good advise  gets away without being ill.    Good luck with loosing weight on AF drugs - I find they make the situation worse and that is NOT an excuse.    They don't know what causes AF and I suspect its different for everyone too.   I get the impression from my own body is happened more as a way of my body re-acting to the fact that it was struggling somewhere else but who knows ....for sure walking helps me when I can do it.   Clear the toxins away and I am sure that helps. 

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  • Posted

    Hi Robyn,

    That seems a bit odd maybe because your cardiologist doesn't know what causes it as none of them seem to he just said it off the cuff.

    I haven't drunk alcohol for over 20 years and I only weigh 46kg (just about 7stone)

    I have onlly had AF for 18 months so mine wasn't connected to drinking but I did become intolerant of alcohol with itching and a rash each time I had red wine.

    I also have immune system problems related to arthritis Sjogren Syndrome and Palindromic rhuematisim so maybe just maybe arthritis is the connection.

    L.

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    • Posted

      Hi Robyn, YES I have itches too, I thought it was effects from Amiodarone. It takes a lot of will power not to scratch. I dont eat wheat, dairy, chocolate now after my last episode- intend to lose15 kilos as I am now 74kilo, and I disgust myself. The last episode scared me.  Good Luck
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  • Posted

    You have a wonderful a/fib cardiologist in Oz. Dr Prash Saunders whose recent research is worth reading. The causes of a fib are numerous,but being overweight is one big factor according to his research. Obviously,losing weight improves high blood pressure,but it's easier to accept this info than to lose the weight. I'm overweight,have lost 1 stone,a fib is a little better...I think! The beta blockers...now stopped...contributed to my weight gain. I bacame so tired and moving/walking was a trial. I feel a lot better without them,though I still take rampril 25mgs & xerelto. 

      Reading your post makes me want to get back on track and shift more weight. Good luck with the weight loss...never easy! Take care.

      

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    • Posted

      Hi Elizabeth, I'm a patient of Prash Sanders and am part of an AF research trial that he's conducting. So lucky having ones of the AF 'gurus' here in Adelaide!

      He has particularly good success with ablation provided (and he emphasises the word PROVIDED), you address yor AF risk factors.

      Data from his teams ablations are 87% chance of being AF at the five year mark (if you address all your risk factors), if you don't address your risk factors it's less than 20% chance of being in rhythm at the five year mark.

      There's a really worthwhile interview with him on Medscape website.

      If you google search 'Legacy PI throws down the gauntlet to US physicians' you'll find it. I found this interview to be quite an 'eye opener' and still watch it every couple of months to help keep my head in the right place with this whole AF thing (plus I guess it also has more meaning for me as he is my electro physiologist) but what he has to say, pretty much applies to anyone with AF.

       

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  • Posted

    Robyn, you have to listen to your cardiologist. That being said, much distinction should be made between "correlation" and "causation". People on this site often muse about something they have done which was followed by af or followed by a cessation of af. More power to them, but don't let it break your heart if you lose weight and still have af. Lots of skinny people have it. However, losing weight helps so many dangerous conditions that you should make the effort no matter what happens to your af. Find someplace which offers water aerobics and work out that way. There's almost no weight bearing, lots of jovial company and good exercise. Good luck to you.

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