overactive thyroid

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just been diagnosed over active thyroid been feeling pretty awful for a while. admitted to hospital blood results showing t4 30.2 and tsh <0.02 can you someone tell me a bit about these results thanks

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  • Posted

    To begin to become knowledgeable, it will help if you always get a paper copy of your lab reports and keep your own file of them.  They show your result for a particular test with the range of normal right beside them.  My doctor tests for TSH (thyroid stimulating hormone), Free T3 (FT3) and Free T4 (FT4).  You might ask your doc why he/she isn't doing these tests when you know other Graves patients' doctors are.  You might also ask your doc if you have Graves disease or just hyperthyroidism.  If it is a family doc or GP that you go to, ask for a referral to an Endocrinologist.  Though different labs vary in what their results are for normal values, your TSH indicates you are hyperactive (low TSH = hyperactive, high TSH indicates hypoactive).  I don't know if you had a T4 or a Free T4 measured so I don't know the normal range for your lab but I would suspect it is in the high range and indicates hyperthyroidism.  No matter the cause, hyperthyroidism needs to be treated or if treatment is not initiated, heart damage can occur.
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  • Posted

    Hi Paula,

    I'm glad your hyperthyroidism has been detected. I am having a test for it. Please can you let me know what your symptoms are. I am being tested because my mum had it and I am showing signs of it. Kind regards

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  • Posted

    Hi Paula, 

    I was diagnosed with an overactive thyroid too recently, I've received some great advice on this forum, and read lots on line.  In hindsight, if I had to give myself some advice a couple of months ago it would be this - 1) there's no quick fix... The way the thyroid operates, it takes time to see any change, so don't get discouraged if you don't see improvement straight away.  2) don't be afraid of the medication, I didn't take it for six months because I read so much about people worried about putting on weight and worried about bad reactions - the truth is that worry is counterproductive, if I'd started taking it when I should, I might be on my way to remission now.  3) be sensible, eat well, try to do some gentle excersise everyday, know your limits, say no more often, try to cut down or cut out caffeine, gluten, aspartame (sweetener is a no no), soy and iodine, drink more water (it helps to keep well hydrated and helps with brain fog).  Just because you have an overactive thyroid, doesn't mean you have graves or hashimotos, mine occurred after a bad upper respiratory infection which knocked my thyroid out, it'll take time to recover, but I'm confident if it will.  I would have thought the hospital might have tested for antibodies, also with your results you probably would have been referred to an endocrinologist, ask your gp if youre unsure.  May I ask what symptoms caused you to be admitted?  Hope you get the answers you're looking for, keep us posted 😚 x

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  • Posted

    It all started october last yr really i was having severe pain my chest,breathing problems etc i just put it down to my copd. xmas eve i took really ill and collapsed and to my surprise in xmas day was diagnosed with a tumor in my thymus gland scared the hell out of me as my daughter is 3 yrs in remission from leukemia thankfull had it removed by sternectomy (like open heart surgery) and it was benign.

    then more problems started sweating, legs and arms shaking,palpations,headaches and most off all 3 and half weight since xmas lost. had numerous admissions to ane they never checked thyroid. only started carbs last week feeling pretty awful at the moment to be honest im only 34 shoukd be full of life but its the complete opposite

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  • Posted

    im seeing endo on 21 november having bloods checked every month via gp also seeing rhemotologist, cardiologist, thoractic doctor as well
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    • Posted

      Hi Paula, 

      Wow, you have had a LOT to deal with! The carbimozole may take about 6 weeks to kick in, but you should start to feel much better soon, it may help to take vitamin D and l-carnitines, Linda187 suggested them to me as it helps with muscle fatigue and can accelerate the effects of the carbimozole, although with the other health problems you have had, you might want to do some research of your own on these.  Your symptoms sounds like classic graves, but you should definitely ask the endo for an official diagnosis.  I do hope you start to feel better soon, I'm 37 and feel the same, this is a horrible condition, but you're not alone, we can always support one another!  Take care! X

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  • Posted

    thanks so much its a bit of a relief that i know whats going on now to be honest. i really thought my head was going after the shock at xmas and so much going on with my daughter. i think stress has a big part to play in how your health and wellbeing is xx
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  • Posted

    Hi paula,

    I was also diagnosed with overactive thyroid last week, ive been feeling so ill since I gave birth to my second daughter in December,Ive had headaches, weight loss, palpatations and not fit to look after my kids. I fainted several times, my neck is swollen and as a result I had my bloods taken. I have no idea what it means,but my doc said my level was way over 100? He put me on carbimazole  and proponolol and has refferred me to an endocrinologist. Is it normal to feel this ill? Im only turning 32.

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    • Posted

      While I don't know which of the thyroid tests he was referring to, with a value of 100 on any of them, I can understand why you are feeling so ill.  It sounds like you are going through what they call a "thyroid storm".  As soon as your meds kick in within the next couple of weeks, you should start to feel better.  The propranolol will help immediately with stopping the palpitations and slowing down your heart rate.  Even when they do kick in however, with your thyroid levels running this high, your body will probably be depleted of the amino acid Carnitine from your muscles.  You can get this checked by asking your doc to take a Total Carnitine and Free Carnitine blood test and if deficient start supplementation with L-Carnitine.  My hyperthyroidism was mild and I was deficient in carnitine.  You can also take some naturopathic supplements like Bugleweed, Melissa and Lemon Balm (my naturopath has these 3 herbs combined in one capsule) as well as selenium.  Do you have eye problems?  If so, it will help to see an opthalmologist about this.  Eye problems often go hand in hand with Graves disease.  You may not have Graves disease (an autoimmune disease that causes hyperthyroidism) but your hyperthyroidism may be due to an infection.  Your endocrinologist I am sure will check this out.  Finally other hyperthyroid patients have been helped also by changing their diets and avoiding gluten.  They are on what is called a Paleo diet, you can google this to get more info on this.  It will also help when you see your Endo to ask for printed copies of any tests that are ever run on you.  You may not understand them now but keeping the copies is the beginning of understanding this disease and it is very important to build your own file.
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    • Posted

      Thanks Linda, I really dont know enough about it yet, this information is really helpful. My eyes arent sore but my vision is tired if that makes sense? and sensitive to light. I also took the shingles, my immune system mustve been so low.

      Its nice to know that Im not alone.

      Im waiting on an emergency app with the endo. Its amazing how one gland can affect so many things. Thanks for all the info xx

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