Plantar fasciitis

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As there has been no activity on this topic I thought I would start a discussion rather than just answer others.

I have had this condition in my left foot for a year now and as others have said it is bloody painful making walking impossible. I also have arthritis in my right Knee and have gout which is also very painful. The gout is under control with Allopurinol and I have steriod injections in the knee which sometimes work and other times not so I have to take painkillers for that.

Having started taking a new painkiller because I had side effects from Naproxen I noticed that the plantar fasciitis had gone and I was able to walk as far as my knee would allow me. I notice a slight pain when I first get up but that goes away after a few minutes so I am just left with the knee pain which is bearable with the painkillers and only gets unbearable after walking a couple of miles. I have reduced the pain killers from 3 a day to 1 a day and my foot is still OK. I am still doing the exercises and walking a couple of miles a day and it is only my Knee that is still a problem, I am hoping the next steroid injection may work better or prehaps its the cold wet weather that is causing it to be so painful. I will then stop the painkillers and see if the Plantar fasciitis pain returns.

I have an appointment this week with the Podistry service to see if they can suggest a solution long term but at the moment I am enjoying being able to walk the dog again and go skiing next month by which time I hope to of had another injection in the knee to solve that problem untill they can offer a longer term solution for that one, the problems of getting old!!!

Oh! the painkiller I take is called INDOMETACIN 25mg and are for ligament/tendon pain, Gout, arthritis, back pain and period pain all of which I have other than the period pain be a bit worried if I had that one being male.

Hope this helps some of you as I know different drugs help some and not others and its a case of finding one that suits you but I like to keep the painkillers for short times when nothing else works.

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4 Replies

  • Posted

    Christophe, I just joined this group and was curious how you were holding up after 6 months.

    I had both my knees replaced about 22 months ago and as I started in creasing my walking, planter fasciitis knocked the wind right out of my sails. I have been using a very solid insert (not a cheap way to do it) since January and the pain in my left foot is hardly noticable. The right foot isn't as painful, but it's got a ways to go.

    -Mo

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    • Posted

      Hi Moandrieu,

      Always nice to hear from fellow sufferers as it appears the only way to find a sulution to these problems. My pf appears to of retreated giving me just a twinge in the mornings or a bit of pain after walking a few miles. I have stopped the pain killers and am on streroid injections into the knee for the joint pain and they last for 2-3 months at the moment depending where they inject it the more it hurts when they do it the better I know it will be. They say I will need knee replacement in the future but to hold on as long as possible because there is research into cartelege regrowtho that would be a better option for me as it is less invasive and as I have only had the right knee washed out so far it would be an option for me. The left knee is OK at the moment I damaged the right by stepping off the 2nd or third tread of ladders while at work as I was up and down ladders all day with glasses on for close work so the steps were out of focus.

      As I still get the odd twinge to remind me the pf is still there I wear the gel heel pads all the time and keep doing the calf stretching exercises but I think it is the gel heel pads that help the most, luckily they are only a couple of quid so I can have them in all my shoes.

      I have pf insoles in my ski boots as the gel heels pads are too soft and I find the insoles take the wieght off the heel tranferring it to the sole of the foot so it makes skiing painfree at least untill I crash, at 63 I am still trying to master the blacks think I started skiing too late to ever enjoy blacks as I do the blues and reds.

      Hope this helps and as many others sau cushion and cushion a bit more it cannot hurt where exercises may if you have torn tissue rather than thight muscles.

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    • Posted

      Thanks Christophe. Compared the the knee replacement forum, this site is pretty quiet. Your imput is appreciated. Good luck on those black slopes. I never got into skiing. I tried when I was in younger. My parents loved cross country skiing, which I thought was boring. So I took to the slopes with school friends. But it boiled down to I just don't like being in the snow (I was stranded in a huge drift at 3 years old, as my mom had her hands full with my younger sister and infant brother. While it wasn't for more than 10 minutes, I think it was enough to scar me for life. smile

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    • Posted

      You don't want to be scared I went Skiing with my school in the late sixties but when we arrived in Austria there was no snow on the nursary slopes so two teachers who were going to teach us took several of our party who could ski up to see what the higher slopes could offer but they both fell and broke their legs and several of the pupils had sprained ankles so all skiing was stopped because we had no qualified teachers so we ended up on a walking holiday waliking from one bar to another sending the oldest looking one in to buy the drinks.

      We did not have skiboots in those days, you just wore walking boots and clamped the skiis on to those which is why we had so many ankle injuries and broken legs.

      It put me off trying it again untill my niece said go on Uncle Chris you will love it and with the proper boots I did indeed get to love it once I mastered how to turn.

      So give it another go once you have cured the pf, I ski in Tignes in France and Sun peaks in Canada, both are great for all levels of skier but do have a private lesson first to get you able to turn then you can go with a group and keep up.

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