Possibly copd

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Hello, I am looking for some advice please If possible?

I recently had a lung function test at hospital, the results showed that I have reduced transfer rate and fev1. My doctor called me in to talk with me and she mentioned I could have copd?

Is this likely and what does transfer rate and fev1 mean?

Have a great day

Jane x

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10 Replies

  • Posted

    Not to sure on the transfer rate but your FEV1 is how much air you can exhale from your lungs in 1 second.

    What was your FEV1?

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    • Posted

      Hi hary thanks for your reply! I know this sounds bad buty memory is dreadful..... I think they were 87% and 67% I am going to call my doctors today i think and just ask again what they were!

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    • Posted

      Hi Gary

      Am I right in thinking that this is the reading when you are at the doctors or chest clinic, they say breathe in as much as bossible and then you blow into a tube fixed to either a machine or a hand held one, until you cough and can't do it any longer, and the doctor gets a reading measuring the expelled air from your lungs? Usually at a Chest Clinic, they will make you do it 3 times (if possible) but at the doctor's surgery, only once. My last GP test was 150 on his hand held machine and he mentioned it should be 200. Does this make sense?

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    • Posted

      This sounds like a peak and flow meter test which is primarily used for asthma.  My FEV1 is around 78% and I can blow an average of 350 on it though my nurse says it should be around 450. 

      A spirometry test is used to measure your lung function.  This is a much bigger machine where you still blow into it but this can measure your FEV1 (lung function),  FVC  (forced vital capacity) and others which I am not sure about.  The most important one is your FEV1.   Do you know yours?  x

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    • Posted

      No, I had never even heard about it until I came on this site, although I have blown into a big machine at the chest clinic some years back and it printed out a graph to be given to the Consultant. Now you mention it, I had heard of peak flow meter, as I was once given one by the hospital and had to keep a record for a couple of weeks. I have had COPD since my mid forties and am now 72 yrs old and was discharged from the chest clinic when I was in my fifties, as I was on the maximum suitable medication for COPD and there was no point in going every six months, especially as I have a very good GP. However, thank you for the information, it is very helpful. I am seeing my GP this afternoon to get blood results and will ask him if he knows my FEV1,

      Regards, Val.

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    • Posted

      P,S, I have had asthma since I was 18 months old, when there was no medication for asthma at all. I was sent away to a boarding school for sick children to Kent near the sea when I was about 6 to 12 yrs old because of the London Smog which killed millions of people in London (UK) then it turned to COPD later.

       

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  • Posted

    I am sorry no one has answeed your query but i really have no idea what you re talking about.

    No doc/nurse/specialist has mentioned any of what you mention ie:- transfer rate or fev1 

    I just have what was mild COPD bu tnow I reckon after a bad dose of lurgy it has got worse.

    You must get some advice from a GP who seems the slightest bit interested in setting up an appt forr you for treatment. Iam disgusted to hear that nothing has been done,

    My new doc tor declined to listen to my chest last time I visited, when I asked, and tnext time aid you haven;t coughed once since you arrived,

    Brilliant!

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    • Posted

      Hi there, thanks for your reply, it's quite awful

      Really that there are doctors who just done seem interested! I am sure if they experienced SOME of the symptoms we did they would want answers and help! I am hoping when spot comes through for respiratory specialist that they will help more, it's just a case of suing the waiting game now I guess?!

      Have a good day

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  • Posted

    Hi Jane

    ​Whilst there are some very informative people on this site, it is preferable for you to ask your doctor for more information and a better explanation. Although many general practitioners are well informed, many of us have a specialist such as a pulmonologist or respiritory physician who typically has more indepth knowledge. Might be worth your while seeking a referral.

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