Post TKR Range of Movement

Posted , 9 users are following.

Hi!

I'm now virtually 8 wks post TKR and have had a virtually text book recovery (dont ask me how?!). I have a very good bend when seated on a chair and bending backwards. However, if I'm standing and lifting my heel to my bottom, sitting on the flat or laying down when I get so far I get a crampy sort of feeling behind the knee just above and just below the joint. Does anyone else experience this and does anyone have any idea why or what causes this?

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14 Replies

  • Posted

    Yes and I'm nearly 13 months after RTKR and can only walk slowly with a Walker. So, How? Have a happy Christmas and don't bend that leg back too much! 🙂

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    • Posted

      I feel for you James!! Possibly a daft question and apologies in advance, but have you been following the exercise regime the physio gave you? I was warned in advance by others who knew from experience that you MUST do the exercises no matter how uncomfortable. A certain amount of pain too but you kind of know it's normal for what you're doing. I followed instruction, grudgingly at times as it's not pleasant, but I think that maybe a large part of my recovery. That and the fact that I'm blessed with good healing Gene's.

      I hope you progress soon and if not I'd strongly recommend a trip back to your consultant as 13 months and still using a Walker doesn't sound right to me?!?! Have a lovely Xmas!!!

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  • Posted

    Yes and I'm nearly 13 months after RTKR and can only walk slowly with a Walker. So, How? Have a happy Christmas and don't bend that leg back too much! 🙂

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  • Posted

    Touching your heel to your butt requires a flexion of +161. The ROM PTs like to see post-op is at least +120 while over time, exercise can extend that into the +130s which is sufficient for all of daily life. Once you get to +140, you're entering "athlete's range". I have never heard a doc or PT recommend that. Why? The devices in our knees were never meant to flex that far and doing so may endanger the device and/or shorten its lifespan. Again, this is from every medical professional I've talked to plus the experience of people on the Forum.

    However... There's a new breed of devices out there that may allow for greater flexion than +140, are specifically designed to do so AND last 25 years. I don't know of anyone with one of these and I have heard nothing regarding their testing or longevity.

    If you are going to sit on your heels, the first place I'd start my research is with your doc. What company made your device and what is its model number? If the doc cannot provide you with the device's maximum flexion specifications, contact the manufacturer to find out what they are. I would not recommend doing any flexion beyond +140 until you have that data. You need to know if the actual device in your leg can handle that degree of flexion day after day for 25 years. The manufacturer should be able to provide you with that exact specification. You don't want to risk a device failure or a longevity less than the standard 25 years. Understand that replacing the knee again will never be as good and tight as the first one. You really, really want to avoid that.

    When I had my hip replaced (yes, before the knee), I asked the doc 2 weeks later if I could get back to playing hockey. He said: "Sure, if you want your hip to last only three years instead of 25." Sold all my equipment the next day. Be smart. Know the limitations of your knee. If it's one of the new ones that can handle the +161 flexion, then good for you...wish I had one. However, I would make absolutely sure that your knee can handle the flexion.

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    • Posted

      I believe this to be well researched and very good advice. It's a bit daunting for someone who may heal at a much different rate which may be normal for them. Let's remember this website is not a brag book; let's encourage one another.

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    • Posted

      In this case, it's encouraging the member to research the limits of their device. That's it. I would highly recommend this to ANY TKR "survivor" who wants to extend their flexion beyond +140.

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    • Posted

      Hi Chico!

      I'm not actually trying to get my heel to my butt, just lift my lower leg up in that direction as we do at times when stepping over things etc. Pretty sure it's not tight hamstrings as I can bend down and touch my toes with no warm up. I can just about get 90 degrees bend that way but when seated can go past that easily. Dont actually know my degree of bend when seated just that my physio and consultant were impressed. I'm getting th impression this is a common experience with TKR but wondering what causes it. Going to see my Chiopractor soon so will ask him if he has any idea.🤔🤔🤔

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  • Posted

    hi

    I am 11 weeks post rtkr and i have had that problem and still have although it is getting easier its caused through a very tight ham string and i'm sure mine is made of memory foam as i can stretch it all day then go to bed and the next morning its back again i think like many people its time and loads of patients to get over this op i have been having acupuncture and its fantastic for releasing the tightness

    good luck with your recovery just keep putting in the hard work .... i cant wait to be back to normal lol

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    • Posted

      Lol about the memory foam hamstring...so true. When you're lucky enough to have unbroken sleep the leg just wants to stay in that position. It is getting much easier to get up at night but I'm not jumping out of bed at 11 wks. I wake up, roll over and say "Oh yeh, I had TKR"

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  • Posted

    You are fortunate indeed. I am 74 y/o and also doing well. My biggest problem is nighttime and getting my left leg to settle down. I would call it nighttime discomfort.

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  • Posted

    I am 4 months post op on my left TKR. I was told behind the knee was always hurting there was just other pains that were worse. Behind my knee hurt for about a week and then just one day I stopped noticing it. Congrats on being textbook! I am too, I don't know how either but I am grateful for it that's for sure!!

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